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Full text of "Town Report"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport1987linc 



REPORT 

of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1987 




Lincoln, Massachusetts 



Cover - Photograph by 
Ann Ringwood 
Beacon Communications 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
TOWN CALENDAR 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Page 



Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 6 

Town Clerk 20 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 38 

Town Accountant 43 

Board of Assessors 52 

Collector of Taxes 55 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 56 

Civil Defense & Emergency Preparedness 58 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring and Plumbing 59 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 60 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 61 

Council on Aging 65 

Minute Man Home Care Corp. 66 

Animal Control Officer 67 

North East Solid Waste Committee 68 

Permanent Transfer Station Design Review Committee 70 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 72 

Board of Appeals 75 

Long Range Planning Committee 77 

Conservation Commission 78 

Traffic Management Committee 81 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 82 

Housing Commission 84 

Water Commissioners 86 

Public Works 89 

Pierce Property Committee 91 

Cemetery Commissioners 92 

Historical Commission 93 

Historic District Commission 94 

Codman Community Farms 95 

Cable Televeision Committee 98 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS CONTINUED 

Route 128 Area Committee 99 

Bemls Hall Advisory Committee 101 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 102 

Personnel Board 103 

LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 104 

DeCordova Museum & Park 109 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 115 

Lincoln Arts Council 116 

Constitutional Bicentennial Celebrations Committee 117 

Recreation Committee 119 

Elementary School Committee 120 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 127 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 138 

Lincoln Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 139 
Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District 140 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 147 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 152 

Valuation List 164 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1987-88 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 



Every Monday evening, 7:30 pm 
Town Offices Building 259-8850 

Every other Monday evening, 8:00 pm 
Superintendant's Office 259-9400 

For appointments, call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

First Tuesday evening of each month, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

First Monday evening of each month, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 7:30 pm Town Offices Bldg. 

Every other Monday evening, 8:30 pm 
Town Offices Building 

See bulletin board, Town Offices 
Building 

4,993 (Town Census) 

14.56 square miles 

$9.08 

Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 28, 1987 

Last Monday in March - March 30, 
1987 



QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3231 (As of July 1, 1987) 

Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 am 
to 4:30 pm (Closed Saturdays) 
Telephone 259-8850 (All departments) 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John R. Caswell 

Susan C. Fargo 

John C. Goodrich, Chairman 

Highlighted by the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution, 1987 was a 
year of looking back as well as ahead as we completed earlier 
undertakings and implemented new initiatives. Lincoln's own Bicentennial 
Commission, appointed by the Selectmen, began planning events for the 
Town's celebration, which in March will include a Town Meeting discussion 
of constitutional issues. A Rich Harvest, by Jack MacLean, was 
published, providing a comprehensive look at the history of Lincoln and 
the past which shaped our present. 

The Town could also point to substantial progress in a number of 
areas in 1987, some of which had their beginnings in previous years and 
will largely come to fruition in the future. Efforts to upgrade Route 2, 
that perennial subject of these reports, moved steadily forward after 
several years of public hearings to elicit public comment on design plans 
at their various stages of completion. 

The Town's North Lincoln project advanced towards what is expected 
to be a spring, 1988, construction start through the efforts of many, 
many people in Town, teaching us along the way just how many intrinsic 
hurdles we needed to overcome to bring such a project to completion. 

We made headway on the technical side as well. The Selectmen issued 
a provisional cable television license to Nashoba Communications, and 
installation began on a new computer system at Town Offices which should 
enhance governmental operations. On the people side, we were pleased 
with the results of efforts concerning Town personnel. A new 
classification system and salary plan for non-union personnel was 
adopted, after a lengthy analysis involving several Town Boards, an 
outside consultant and Town Offices personnel. Contracts with our three 
unions - Police, Fire and DPW - were successfully negotiated. 

Traffic remained a dominant issue. Commuter traffic continued to 
increase, and once again we rallied to confront the serious potential 
impacts of yet another immense development on our Town's border. 

During the past year we continued to wrestle with the difficult 
fiscal management task which began with Proposition 2 1/2 and will 
continue into the future as far as we can see. Even with a tight control 
on operating expenses in FY 88, we had to ask the Town to approve an 
override to Proposition 2 1/2. Still tougher financial decisions and 
choices face us in the years ahead. 

Land Use and Housing 

Town officials and employees spent a prodigious amount of time on 
housing issues, particularly the efforts involved in bringing the North 
Lincoln project to fruition. The Town's support for this award-winning 
project helped make it possible last spring to execute a Memorandum of 
Agreement with the Department of Communities and Development concerning 
the Town's housing policies and efforts. Signing of this agreement means 
that the Town is in compliance with Executive Order 215 and is eligible 
for state funds in a number of areas. 



That agreement, which calls for the continued coordinated efforts of 
several town boards, included the study of five Town-owned sites as to 
their feasibility for housing. The Housing Commission has undertaken 
that analysis, which was funded by a $5,000 state grant for a consultant 
to assist in the evaluation. Other elements of the agreement include an 
inventory of undeveloped land in town and development of a housing plan; 
both tasks are presently underway under the auspices of the Planning 
Board, the Housing Commission and the Long Range Planning Committee. 

Months were spent by the Planning Board and others in the exhaustive 
review of the special permit applications of the developers of Battle 
Road Farm and of Cranberry Hill, the commercial facility. In September, 
the Planning Board awarded a special permit to Lincoln House Associates. 
After receipt of a permit from the Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering (DEQE), the housing developer expects to start construction 
in the spring. In the fall the Selectmen signed a purchase and sale 
agreement with Lincoln House Associates, with a closing slated for March, 
1988. A key player in the successful conception and implementation of 
this project was Rosamond Delori, former Chairman of the Planning Board, 
who retired last March after many productive years on the Planning 
Board. In extending our gratitude we offer our hope that her sabbatical 
from Town government will be brief. 

An interesting side note to the North Lincoln project was the 
discovery on the housing parcel of a unique prehistoric Indian site which 
will be studied and preserved, in cooperation with the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission. 

During the summer we learned that the Order of St. Anne's would be 
ending its care of adult women with special needs at Bethany and that the 
property might become available. The Selectmen, with the assistance of 
concerned townspeople, have indicated the Town's interest to the 
appropriate parties and this opportunity will be pursued in the coming 
year. 

Minuteman Vocational Regional Technical High School began 
construction of an affordable house on its land on Mill Street, as part 
of Its educational program. On the frustrating side, the bureaucratic 
hurdles imposed by the State's public bidding laws have added cost and 
delay to our efforts to renovate a house on Sunnyside Lane which the Town 
has leased from the Massachusetts Department of Public Works. We will be 
considering several options, including securing a longer-term lease of 
the house, purchasing it from the state, or abandoning the project to 
channel the town's funds Into other projects. 

Overall, the Town can point to some significant accomplishments in 
the housing area, building on efforts begun in the early 1970 's and 
looking ahead to plans and projects which will have their impacts in the 
next decade. One active and eloquent campaigner on the housing front for 
many years has been Elizabeth Snelling, who retired last June as Chairman 
of the Housing Commission. We are deeply indebted to her unswerving 
commitment, sagacity and many contributions to improving the options for 
affordable housing in Town. 

Traffic and Regional Issues 

Route 2 continued as one of the longest-running sagas in our recent 
history, but noteworthy progress has been made over the last three years, 
culminating in the 25% and 75% design completion hearings which were held 
this year on the Route 2/Bedford Road interchange plans. Many residents 
attended, spoke out or wrote letters, and the Selectmen continued to 
forward residents' concerns in formal letters of submittal to the state 
DPW. At year's end, after nearly four years of hearings and review, 



construction was expected to begin this spring on another project to 
upgrade the section of road from the Bedford Road intersection to the 
Lexington line. 

The National Park Service issued its recommended plan for the Minute 
Man National Historical Park, including several alternatives for 
relocating Route 2A away from the Battle Road. While very supportive of 
the Park's efforts, the Selectmen have emphasized that the Town's support 
for these plans are contingent upon the adequate provision of access for 
residents and for the delivery of municipal services. 

During 1987, together with our neighboring towns of Bedford, Concord 
and Lexington, Lincoln has both worked and sparred with our fourth 
neighbor, Massport. At the end of the year, the four towns reconstituted 
the Hanscom Area Traffic Study Committee as "HATS II" with an expanded 
charge to include land use planning issues in addition to traffic. At 
issue during the year was Massport' 8 real intentions in the future 
development of Hanscom Field, following the publishing of the Greiner 
Report. We anticipate ongoing discussions with Massport, the U.S. Air 
Force and our neighboring towns In the coming year. 

All was not quiet on the Eastern Front with Waltham during 1987. We 
learned that our fears of five years ago when the Bay Colony project was 
proposed were minor compared to the development now proposed and the 
potential for more in the future. Of particular concern were Boston 
Property's plans to develop more than one million square feet on land in 
Waltham adjacent to Bay Colony. A facility that size could generate 
nearly 17,000 car trips daily which, when coupled with the existing 
background growth, would have devastating impacts townwide on Lincoln's 
residential roads and those In Weston and Waltham. 

Boston Property's petitions to the Middlesex County Commissioners to 
widen portions of Old County Road and Winter Street to provide access 
through Lincoln to their Waltham development was the subject of a hearing 
December 1. That hearing, which was continued until February 2, 1988, 
was attended by several hundred people who protested the petition, which 
was opposed by officials from Lincoln, Weston and Cambridge and residents 
from Lincoln, Weston and Waltham. The coming year will see ongoing 
efforts to protect against this threat to Lincoln. The Town is indebted 
to the tireless and creative efforts of the Route 128 Task Force, chaired 
by the indefatigable Beth Sutherland, and many other concerned citizens 
who have over the past five years donated thousands of volunteer hours to 
assess the problem and to propose alternate solutions. 

Personnel/Town Services 

The Personnel Study, conducted with Olney Associates, will provide 
an excellent means for the fair administration of the non-union personnel 
system and should serve effectively for many years with minor updating. 
In the future, fiscal constraints will have to be balanced against 
arguably needed increases in staffing as demands for services increase 
and state regulations and mandated programs continue to complicate Town 
government. 

In the area of public works, an important project was the completion 
of the Lewis Street reconstruction. Our ongoing road program saw the 
overlaying of portions of Lincoln, Conant, Silver Hill and Weston Roads; 
the tree program continues to add to the beauty and safety of our roads. 

Safety on the roads in all seasons continues to be a primary concern 
of our public safety personnel who noted an increase in traffic on town 
roads. Fortunately, last year saw a decrease in breaking and entering 



cases. In the coming year we will examine public safety staffing and 
space needs. We remain indebted to Police Chief James Arena, Fire 
Captain Richard Goddard and other public safety employees for their 
dedicated efforts to protect life and property in Town and to help 
maintain our general sense of security. 

This year as in the past, our efforts with both union and non-union 
personnel served to remind us how blessed the Town is in the dedicated, 
capable and hardworking employees who keep town government operating. 
One such employee, Bill Whalen, retired after three decades of committed 
service to the Town as a Police Communicator, and we are most grateful 
for his caring attendance to duty. 

Several longstanding projects moved forward in 1987. The 
provisional licensing agreement for cable television was executed, 
following years of work by a fine committee, with construction slated to 
start in the early spring, 1988. After several years of dedicated study 
and evaluation of alternatives by both Town employees and volunteers, two 
recommendations were made on how best to satisfy the Town's computer 
needs. Despite efforts to resolve the differences in the two points of 
view presented to the Selectmen, the Board ultimately had to choose one 
of the recommendations, based on what it felt was best for the management 
of Town operations. We remain deeply grateful to all who participated in 
the study and who devoted so much time and energy to a final outcome. At 
year's end, implementation of the new system was proceeding smoothly. 

At last we have succeeded in "pole-arizing" Lincoln. With the help 
of the Planning Board, the Garden Club, and others, the Peace Pole was 
finally planted in the mini-park shortly before Thanksgiving. We counted 
our blessings also to see the Great Wall II on the Town Hill near 
completion after rocky progress. (We plan no stonewalling in 1988.) 

New and Continuing Issues 

One of the biggest issues facing the Town is fiscal management, 
mainly the increasing inability of our revenues to meet projected 
expenses within the mandated limits of Proposition 2 1/2. With 
relatively new construction or a commercial base in town to generate new 
revenues, It is very difficult to keep annual increases to 2 1/2%, as 
required under that levy - limiting legislation. In addition, the Town 
has seen great increases over the past few years in "uncontrollable 
expenses," such as insurance, pension funding, solid waste disposal costs 
and debt. Some gains have been made this year in reducing insurance 
costs, and we are actively pursuing loss control measures. However, a 
number of major bond issues for construction projects, which the town has 
voted to exempt from Proposition 2 1/2, have added to our tax bills. 

Town Meeting action In March approved expenditures for school 
repairs, landfill closure and construction of a bathhouse, which was 
completed in time for summer use. Work is progressing on designs for the 
permanent transfer station, which we expect to be an upgraded version of 
the existing facility, pending approval from DEQE. A design review 
committee appointed by the Selectmen will be reviewing these plans before 
presentation to the 1988 Town Meeting. With this revised plan, of a much 
smaller scale than what DEQE indicated a year ago was required, we are 
optimistic the construction costs will be less than what was presented at 
the 1987 Annual Town Meeting. 

That Town Meeting approved new animal control regulations, and we 
initiated by-mail dog licensing and issued a new booklet for animal 
owners. The Board of Selectmen also established two committees whose 
recommendations may have important significance in the future: the 
Aquifer Protection Study Committee and the Land Bank Study Committee. 



Underscoring all these efforts are the contributions made by the 
many volunteers who serve on boards and committees. Their selfless 
contributions to participatory government provide the muscle in Lincoln's 
"body politic" and serve as a fitting and ongoing commemoration of the 
U.S. Constitution. We are deeply grateful to all these public servants, 
including some who have retired this year: Dave Elwood from the Finance 
Committee; David Sykes and Jane Bray ton from the Zoning Board of Appeals; 
Joseph Howard from the Board of Assessors; Jim White from the Route 128 
Committee and Chris Brayton from the MBTA Advisory Board. 

We were saddened this year by the passage of some perennial figures 
from the scene. Town Meeting won't be quite the same without Jim 
DeNormandie, who made such an imprint on the Town as farmer, 
conservationist and public servant. Among those also leaving their mark 
on Lincoln and us bereft at their loss were Roland Robbins, Alvin Levin, 
Eveleth Todd, Elizabeth Slayter, and Michael Stratton. 

Insuring future "rich harvests" for the Town will continue to 
require stewardship on the part of volunteers, Town employees and 
officials. Together we can meet the many challenges facing the Town of 
Lincoln as creatively as we have in the past. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



Term Expires 






David Donaldson 1990 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1988 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John R. Caswell 1989 

Susan Fargo 1990 

John C. Goodrich, Chairman 1988 

TOWN TREASURER 

Roy M. Raja 1988 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1990 

Joseph W. Howard (resigned) 1988 

Paul Marsh 1989 

Robert L. Jenal (appointed) 1988 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Roy M. Raja 1989 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Sarah G. Bobbitt 1990 

Wilson C. Hayes, Chairman 1989 

Wendy Kameny 1990 

Michaela M. Lipsey 1988 

Joan Walker 1989 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 1990 

Robert DeNormandie 1989 

Gabe Farrell, Chairman 1988 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Perry Culver, M.D., Chairman 1990 

George P. Faddoul, D.V.M. 1988 

John M. O'Loughlin, M.D. 1989 



Term Expires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Richard F. Brooks 

Cornelius S. Hickey, Jr., Chairman 

Lynn Donaldson 

Geraldine C. Nogelo 

David S. Pettit 

Phyllis Rappaport 



1989 
1988 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1990 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



James DeNormandie, Chairman 
Marjorie Holland 
H. Arnold Made an 



1989 
1990 
1988 



PLANNING BOARD 



F. Douglas Adams 

Margery P. Collins 

William G. Constable, Chairman 

Elizabeth Corcoran 

Warren F. Flint, Jr. 



1988 
1990 
1989 
1991 
1992 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Rosamond Delori 



1988 



FENCE VIEWER 



Katherine McHugh 
David Sykes 



1988 
1988 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



George C. Hibben 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



1988 
1989 
1990 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



John Curtis Perry 
Harriet V. Relman 
W. Allen Rossiter 



1990 
1989 
1988 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



David Ford 

Douglas Harding 

Mary Newman, Chairman 

Carol White (School Committee's Appointee) 

Barbara Low (Elected by Town) 

Walter Salmon (Selectmen's Appointee) 



self-perpetuating 



1988 
1989 
1990 



Term Expires 

DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Directors 



Lynn Gargill 1991 

John French 1990 

Gregory G. Harney 1988 

Julia Pugh 1989 

"B" Directors 



Meredyth Hyatt Moses (School Committee's Appointee) 1989 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 1988 

Margaret Wengren (Selectmen's Appointee) 1990 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

Lorian Brown, Chairman 1989 

Giles Browne 1989 

Raymond Johnson (Appointed by the State) 1989 

Mary Helen Lorenz 1988 

Henry Morgan (Selectmen's Appointee) 1989 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams (elected post) 1989 

Elizabeth Evans (elected post) 1990 

Conrad H. Todd (elected post) 1988 

Monika Duborg (Selectmen's appointee) 1990 

George W. Seeley (Selectmen's appointee) 1988 

John Walker, Chairman (Selectmen's appointee) 1989 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Term Expires 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

David Ramsay 1988 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Betty L. Lang 1988 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Alyson A. Morse 1988 

TOWN COUNSEL 

David Dinwoodey 1988 

Thomas Arnold 1988 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Frank C. Emmons, Jr. 1988 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Richard P. Carroll 1988 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Dominick James Arena 1988 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 

Charles E. Doyle 1988 

POLICE SERGEANT 

David Davis 1988 

INSPECTOR 

Allen Bowles 1988 



David Eysie 
John Fitzgerald 
Robert Gallo 
Richard J. Hallett 
Patrick Kenney 
Gerald Mahoney 
Kevin Mooney 
Thomas Moran 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Term Expires 



1988 
1988 
1988 
1988 
1988 
1988 
1988 
1988 



CONSTABLES 



Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 



1988 
1988 



DOG OFFICER 



Barbara King 



1988 



FIRE CHIEF 



Dominick James Arena 



1988 



TREE WARDEN 
LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 



Todd Brown 



1988 



FOREST WARDEN 



Dominick James Arena 



Ernest L. Johnson 



Ernest L. Johnson 



Kenneth Desmond 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 


BUILDING 


INSPECTOR 


WIRING 


INSPECTOR 


PLUMBING 


INSPECTOR 



1988 



1988 



1988 



1988 



Russell J. Dixon 



1988 



10 



Term Expires 

DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

Thomas B. Moran 1988 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

David W. Ramsay 1988 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Eric Williams 1988 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Curtis Risley 1988 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 

Richard Goddard 1988 

VETERANS ' AGENT 

William B. Whalen 1988 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

William B. Whalen 1988 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1988 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peggy Elliot 1989 

William G. Lang ton 1988 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1990 
Nancy J. Zuelke, ex officio 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION 

Ruth Morey 1989 

Marie Gavin, Alternate 1989 



11 



Term Expiree 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams, Chairman 1988 

Kenneth Bassett 1990 

Thomas Billings 1990 

Claire Cunningham 1990 

Robert Mack 1988 

Nathalie Rice 1989 

William J. Rizzo, Jr. 1989 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Charlotte Barnaby 1990 

Mirian Cook 1988 

William Davis 1989 

Shirley Drew 1990 

Mary Ford 1988 

John Garrison 1990 

Sally Mansfield 1989 

Ruth Morey 1988 

Ann Paddock, Chairperson 1988 

William Poisson 1988 

Ann Satterfield 1989 

Aire-Maija Schwann 1989 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 1988 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Benson (at large) 1990 

John Carman, Chairman (realtor) 1989 

Elizabeth Donaldson (District) 1989 

Colin Smith (architect) 1988 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1990 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Douglas Adams (Planning Bd.) 1988 

John Benson (at large) 1990 

John Carman, Chairman (realtor) 1989 

Elizabeth Corcoran (Planning Bd.) 1989 

Elizabeth Donalson (District) 1989 

Colin Smith (architect) 1988 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1990 

Kenneth Hurd, Alternate (District) 1990 

Kim Kasner, Alternate 1988 



12 



Term Expires 
PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Patricia Asaff 1990 

Nelson Chu 1990 

Edward Ferri 1988 

John French 1989 

Margot Green 1988 

Judy Gross 1990 

William Shea, Chairman 1988 

LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 

Patricia Adams 1989 

Irene Briedis 1989 

Jane Cooper 1988 

Eleanor Friedman 1989 

Richard Lee 1989 

Julia Pugh 1989 

Margaret Ann Rice, Chairman 1989 

Barbara Sisson 1989 



REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Richard Theriault, North Lincoln Association Representative 1988 
Fred Marcus, "At Large" Representative 1988 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) 

John Caswell, Selectmen's Appointee 
Ann F. Sutherland, Member at Large 
Rosamond Delori, Planning Board Appointee 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Katherine McHugh, Alternate 1988 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
John Quincy Adams 1988 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAL AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 
William Constable 1988 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
Susan Fargo 1988 

REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 
Henry Rugo 1988 



13 



Term Expires 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CONCORD-ASS ABET AREA COUNCIL FOR CHILDREN 

Sally Bobbitt 1988 

Nancy Donaldson 1988 

Cynthia Moller 1988 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Morton Braun 1988 

C. Russel Hansen 1990 

D'Arcy MacMahon 1989 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 1992 

Jacquelyn H. Snelling 1991 

John Solman, Associate Member 1990 

Despena Billings, Associate Member 1988 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Henry Morgan 1989 

Jeffrey Mudge, Chairman 1990 

Clare Pinto 1988 

Robert Pinto 1988 

Robert M. Fraser 1990 

PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 

1987 

Glenn Gustavson 1989 

John Stevenson 1988 

J. Michael Tannert 1988 

Rob Webb 1989 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 



Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburg 

John Hammond 

John Ritsher 

Ann F. Sutherland, Chairman 

Richard Wiggin 



SOLID WASTE DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Elizabeth Corcoran, Co-chairman, 

Tina Damico (Mill St.) 

Eleanor Gallitano 

Harry Hadley 

Henry Harrison, Co-chairman 

James Lennon 

Elizabeth Lerman (resident at large) 

Brian Pettigrew (Mill St.) 

David W. Ramsay, Ex-officio 



14 



Term Expires 

BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Lee Evans (Recreation Director) 

Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 

Christel Ide (Representative of First Parish Church) 

Ruth Kramer (Council on Aging Coordinator) 

Daniel Spaeth (Representative of Lincoln Players) 

Eleanor Wilfert (Representative of the Lincoln Grange) , Chairman 

David W. Ramsay, Ex-officio 

CABLE T.V. ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Jack Carver 
Gabe Farrell 
Josephine K. Gump 
John Klobuchar 
Stephen Low, Chairman 
Nathan Parke 
Joseph Rosen 



WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Pat Allen 
Richard Carroll 
Leona Champeny 
Robert DeNormandie 
Frank Emmons 
Gabe Farrell 



BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION OF THE US CONSTITUTION 

Patricia Crandall 

Patricia D. Gray 

Roberta Kanarek 

Paul Marsh 

Margaret Martin 

Katherine McHugh, Co-Chairman 

James McHugh, Co-Chairman 

AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Rebecca Bartovics (Water Commission Rep) 
Jonathan Cohen (Selectmen's appointee) 
William Constable (Planning Board Rep) 
Alan Eschenroeder (Selectmen's appointee) 
Daniel Hunt (Selectmen's appointee) 
John Kimball (Selectmen's appointee) 
Nathalie Rice, Chairman (Conservation Rep) 
Edward Rolfe (Selectmen's appointee) 
Beth Schuller (Board of Health Rep) 

LAND BANK STUDY COMMITTEE 

Christopher Klem 
Lois Love 
Edward Schuller 
Kemon Taschioglou 
Lawrence Thompson 



15 





Term Expires 


SPECIAL 


POLICE 


Leo Algeo, Sr. 


1988 


Barbara Bardaley 


1988 


Donald Bardaley 


1988 


Raymond Barnes 


1988 


Dennis A. Botelho 


1988 


Richard Carroll 


1988 


Steven G. Carter 


1988 


Frank. Caruso 


1988 


Joseph Cavanaugh 


1988 


John Ciraso 


1988 


Arthur Cotonl 


1988 


Lorraine Dean 


1988 


William Dean 


1988 


Neil Duane 


1988 


Frank Emmons 


1988 


Richard Goddard 


1988 


Frank Gordon, Jr. 


1988 


Frank Gordon, Sr. 


1988 


David Maher 


1988 


Tara Tracy 


1988 


Stephen Hupalo 


1988 


Ernest Johnson 


1988 


Herbert Kelley, Jr. 


1988 


Harold Leary 


1988 


Steven Lennon 


1988 


Hazel Mclnnis 


1988 


Richard McCarty 


1988 


Michael Murphy 


1988 


Thomas O'Brien 


1988 


Charles O'Loughlln 


1988 


William Orpik 


1988 


John Navarro 


1988 


Theodore Poulos 


1988 


Seth Rafferty 


1988 


William Ryan 


1988 


Thomas C. Spencer 


1988 


Barbara J. Terrio 


1988 


Walter Van Wart 


1988 


David Whalen 


1988 


John Whalen 


1988 


William Whalen, Jr. 


1988 


William Whalen, Sr. 


1988 


Eric Williams 


1988 


Jonathan Searle 


1988 


Robert Morrison 


1988 


James Lang 


1988 


Susan Mead 


1988 


Robert Ashline 


1988 


Everett Pekins 


1988 


Joseph Drlscoll 


1988 


Mary McCue 


1988 


Elizabeth Bickford 


1988 



16 



Florence Caras 
Jane Barnet 



Madge K. Fisher 



Madge K. Fisher 
Charles Doyle 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



1988 
1988 



1988 



1988 
1988 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



BURIAL AGENT 



Term Expires 
1988 



Jane Barnet 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1988 



17 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joanne Fraser 1989 

Hamilton James 1988 

Lucian Leape 1990 

Bruce Long 1988 

Michael Tennican 1989 

Harriet Todd, Chairman 1989 

Agnes Wiggin 1990 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Scott Lathrop 1988 

Samuel Donnell 1990 

Joanne Hadlock, Chairman 1989 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MINUTEMAN REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Harold Levey 1989 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 

ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 

James Storer 
Sonja Johansson 
Marcia Lee 
Robert Livermore 
Rosalind Feldberg 
Marc Naiman 

LONG-RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Becky Bartovics 1989 

Elizabeth Downey 1990 

Robert Jenal 1988 

Robert Lemire, Chairman 1991 

Katherine Preston 1992 

Richard Theriault 1988 

Lawrence Thompson 1992 



18 



APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Term Expires 

Mary Wiley (Moderator's Appointee) 1988 

Andy Hall (Selectmen's Appointee) 1989 

Sherry Adams (School Committee's Appointee) 1990 

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Terry Fenton (Selectmen's Appointee), Chairman 1988 

Michael Kassner (Selectmen's Appointee) 1987 

Lois Love (Planning Board Appointee) 1989 

David O'Neill (Planning Board Appointee) 1989 

Jonathan Hubbard (Planning Board Appointee) 1988 

Robert Schudy (Selectmen's Appointee) 1987 

Carol White (Planning Board Appointee) 1988 

WANG PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 



Anthony Aieta 
Lonni Brabham 
Edward Chapman 
Brian Deacy 
Donald Driscoll 
Thomas Fagan 
John Harrington 
Robert Knowlton 
Robert LeBlanc 
Edward Mastrocola 
Dwane Rich 
John Skerry 
Robert Wegner 



OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 
Minuteman Vocational High School Properties Only: 

Dennis Deeb and Randall Fox 
Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: 

David Hill and Daniel Hart 
Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: 

Henry Manuel 



19 



TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, and notifying 
the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations which have 
been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the Town 
Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should 
communicate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 28, 1987 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to order 
in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 28, 1987 by the Moderator, Mr. 
David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m., and a quorum being present, (341 voters 
throughout the day) the following business was transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of Officer), 
which will be acted upon on Monday, March 30, 1987, at the Smith School 
Gymnasium, with the polls being open from 7:30 a.m. until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of those 
articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, copies of which 
were sent to the voters at least seven days before the Town Meeting. All 
articles on the Consent Calendar (2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 17) were adopted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by law 

to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : (On Consent Calendar) 

Rosamond Delori be elected Measurer of Wood and Bark 

and Katherine McHugh and David Sykes be elected Fence Viewers for the 

ensuing year. 



ARTICLE 3 



VOTED: 



To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, 

Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

(On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 



Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be accepted. 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 

Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 

additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 

compensation of such members. 

VOTED : (On Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the Town for 

the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1987, and ending June 30, 1988, be 

fixed at the following amounts: 



Town Clerk 

Treasurer and Collector 
Assessors, Chairman 
Assessors, other members, each 
Water Commissioners, each 



$500.00 

10.00 

200.00 

175.00 

75.00 



20 



and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ two of its 
members to work on assessing duties at salaries not to exceed $5,200 and 
$19,824, respectively for the said fiscal period. 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously, except where otherwise stated) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in Exhibit 3, attached to the report of the 
Finance Committee, printed on pages 12 - 21, inclusive, of the Financial 
Section and Warrant for the 1987 Annual Town Meeting and that all items 
be raised by taxation except to the following extent and to the extent 
provided in a second motion to be made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from Water 
Department receipts and $32,122. to be taken from the Air 
Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $9,000. to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account. 

Item 100 Police Department - Salaries - $51,000. to be taken from 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds. 

Item 205 Animal Officer - Salary and Expense - $300. to be taken 

from the Agency Account established for fees received for 
care and custody of dogs. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $79,997. to be taken from 
Metco funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $1,900. to 
be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $500. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 521 Library - Books - $3,549. to be taken from State Aid to 
Libraries. 

Item 811 Sandy Pond Land Bonds - $18,763.69 to be taken from the 
Conservation Commission Gift Accounts. 

Item 821 Codman Barn Repair Loan - $5,000. to be taken from the 

Agency Account established for funds to be received from 
the Codman Trustees. 

Item 822 Interest on Codman Barn Repair Loan - $412.50 to be taken 
from the Agency Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees. 

Reserve Fund - $65,000. to be taken from Overlay Reserve. 

Item 950 Water Department - $405,808. to be taken from 956 
Water Department receipts. 

An amendment to Item 51 - Board of Assessors - Expense - to increase by 
$1.00 to $10,251.00 was passed by a majority voice vote. 



21 



An amendment to Item 306 - Public Works Department - Transfer Station - 
to increase by $1.00 to $290,001.00 was passed by a majority voice vote. 

An amendment to Items 502 -509 - Elementary Schools was made increasing 
Item 502 - Instruction to $1,780,468.00; decreation Item 504 - Operation 
& Maintenance to $337,095.00; and decreasing Item 507 - Salary Reserve to 
$36,726.00 for a total increase of $65,146.00 to $2544457.00 and passed 
unanimously. 

An amendment to the Reserve Fund to increase by $50,000 to $150,000.00 
was passed unanimously. 

The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1987, through June 30, 1988, is shown as $8,095,813.96, and with the 
amendments listed above is now $8,210,961.96. After the application of 
the special funds as listed above, the amount to be raised is 
$7,883,417.77. 

At the conclusion of action on all the articles calling for the 
expenditure of money (after Article 31), it was voted unanimously as 
follows (as a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED : That the sum of $119,869. be taken from Free Cash to reduce 

the total amount to be raised by taxation, as voted under 
the first motion under this Article 5: Provided, however, that if ballot 
question 1 under Article 1 of the Warrant for the 1987 Annual Town 
Meeting shall fail to be approved in accordance with law, the sum to be 
so taken from Free Cash as described above shall instead by $257,498.00 

(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under Article 5 
until action on Article 38 had been completed.) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under Article 
5 of this Warrant, to provide (1) pay increases for union employees as 
required by collective bargaining agreements and (2) general and merit 
pay increases for non-union employees as may be granted by the Selectmen 
and/or the Library Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED ; (Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $11,671. to 
the Library, and $99,623. to the remaining Town departments for the 
fiscal year 1988, $4,493. of which is to be taken from Water Department 
receipts and the balance of which is to be raised by taxation, to provide 
(1) pay increases for union employees as required by collective 
bargaining agreements and (2) general and merit pay increases for 
non-union employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning July 1, 1987, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 



22 



VOTED ; (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to time 
in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1987, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 17, as amended. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 

contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school 

at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any other 

action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and the 

School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the 

Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air 

Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number 

of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, or 

take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorize the School Committee to continue 

the plan to bring a limited number of children from Boston to the Lincoln 

Schools for purposes of education. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to approve the amount of 

indebtedness of $595,000, or any other sum, authorized by 
the vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee, for 
the purpose of remodeling and making extraordinary repairs to the 
Regional School building and for purchasing equipment. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to approve the amount of indebtedness of 
$595,000. authorized by the vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District 
School Committee on March 24, 1987 for the purpose of remodeling and 
making extraordinary repairs to the Regional School Building and for 
purchasing equipment. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will join with the Lincoln-Sudbury 

Regional District School Committee in its petition to the 
General Court for the passage of a special law to authorize the District 
to incur debt for a term not exceeding ten years for the purpose of 
constructing, reconstructing, or making improvements to outdoor 
playground, athletic, and recreational facilities and for the purpose of 
constructing, reconstructing or resurfacing roadways and parking lots. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to join in support of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee's petition to the 
General Court for the passage of a special law to authorize that debt can 
be incurred by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District for a term 
not to exceed ten years for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing 
and making improvements to outdoor playground, athletic and recreational 
facilities and for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing or 
resurfacing roadways and parking lots, such debt to be subject to the 
provisions of Chapters 44 and 71 of the General Laws applicable to the 
incurring of debt and the issuance of bonds or notes by regional school 
districts. 



23 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to approve the amount of 

indebtedness of $155,000, or any other sum, authorized by 
vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee for the 
purpose of reconstructing and making improvements to outdoor recreational 
and athletic facilities and of reconstructing and resurfacing the roads 
and parking lots at the Regional High School, such debt to be issued 
following enactment of the special legislation described in Article 11. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to approve the amount of indebtedness of 
$155,000. authorized by the vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District 
School Committee on March 24, 1987 for the purpose of reconstructing and 
making improvements to the Regional School's outdoor facilities, such 
debt to be issued following enactment of special legislation described in 
Article 11. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination thereof, for remodeling, reconstructing 
or making extraordinary repairs to Town school buildings, including 
replacement or renovation of roofs and lighting and heating systems, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (By a count of 253 in favor, with 1 opposed) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $560,000. to 
be expended by the School Committee for the renovation and installation 
of new roofs, lighting and heating systems; and that to meet such 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
is hereby authorized to borrow all of said appropriated sum under G.L. c. 
44, Section 7 (3A) , as amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town 
therefor payable in accordance with said G.L. c. 44. 

An amendment to reduce the sum to $100,000 was defeated by a majority 
voice vote 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will take further action with respect 

to the proposed construction and financing of a bathhouse 
facility for the Codman Pool, for which an appropriation by taxation of 
$103,000 was previously voted under Article 35 of the Warrant for the 
1986 Annual Town Meeting (the "1986 Appropriation"), including without 
limitation (i) whether to appropriate a supplemental sum in addition to 
or a new sum in lieu of the 1986 Appropriation for such construction, 
(ii) whether such additional or new appropriation shall be raised by 
taxation or transfer from available funds or whether, in the alternative, 
all appropriations for the construction of the bathhouse shall be paid 
for by borrowing under the General Laws, with the funds under the 1986 
Appropriation being released, transferred or applied to another purpose 
as may be specified by this Town Meeting, and/or (iii) whether to rescind 
in its entirety the 1986 Appropriation, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED : (By a count of 188 in favor, with 14 opposed) 

(1) That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$160,000. to be expended by the Recreation Committee for the construction 
of a bathhouse facility for the Codman Pool; and that to meet such 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow all of said appropriated sum 
under Massachusetts G.L. c. 44, Section 7(3) and/or Section 7(25), as 
amended, and issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor payable in 
accordance with said G.L. c. 44. 



24 



(2) That in light of the appropriation by borrowing 
adopted pursuant to Motion 1 under this Article, the sum of $94,500., 
being previously voted for construction of the Codman Pool bathhouse 
facility under Article 35 of the Warrant for the 1986 Annual Town 
Meeting, is hereby transferred in order to fund the appropriation of 
$75,415. for Recreation Committee salaries, line item 600, and the first 
$19,085. for Recreation Committee expenses, line item 602, each as voted 
under the first motion under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1987 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination thereof, for closing out the landfill 
area, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $700,000. for 
closing out the landfill area; and that to meet such appropriation the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow all of said appropriated sum under G.L. c. 44 
Section 7 (24), as amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town 
therefor payable in accordance with said G.L. c. 44. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 

by borrowing or any combination thereof for the design of a permanent 

transfer station at the landfill site, or take any other action relative 

thereto. 

VOTED : (By a majority voice vote as amended) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000., said 

sum to be taken from Free Cash, to retain professional services for the 

design of a permanent transfer station at the landfill site. 

An amendement to reduce the original sum of $50,000 was passed by a count 
of 114 in favor, with 103 opposed. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer 

to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal 

year 1988, as permitted by General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F, or take 

any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer to enter into 

compensating balance agreements with certain commercial banks during 

fiscal 1988, as permitted by General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to 

file a petition and to take such other steps as may be 
necessary or advisable to have the County Commissioners of Middlesex 
County discontinue the following street as a public way: 

a portion of Old Bedford Road beginning at the limit of 
said road as shown on the 1966 State Highway Layout No. 
5624 and running westerly to and including that portion of 
Old Bedford Road previously discontinued or conveyed by the 
Town of Lincoln pursuant to action taken under Article 6 of 
the May, 1980 Special Town Meeting, said portion of Old 
Bedford Road being more particularly shown and described on 
a plan of land entitled "Proposed Roadway Relocation and 
Discontinuance Plan of Old Bedford Road and Virginia Road 
in Lincoln, Mass.", dated February 23, 1987 and prepared by 
BSC-Bedford, scale: 1 inch - 80 feet (the "Roadway Plan"), 
a copy of which plan is available for inspection in the 
Town Hall and in the office of the Town Clerk, 



25 



and to see further if the Town, to the extent of its interest in the 
aforesaid portion of Old Bedford Road, will also vote to discontinue the 
said portion as a public way and to authorize such conveyances or 
releases as may be necessary to fully vest in abutting owners all rights 
in and to the discontinued way, all such actions to be taken or made 
effective (i) upon certification by the Board of Selectmen or other 
appropriate body that a proposed roadway located between the limit of the 
1966 Old Bedford Road State Highway Layout No. 5624 and that portion of 
Virginia Road just south of Lot 5-7, now or formerly owned by the 
Massachusetts Port Authority, and also being more particularly shown on 
the Roadway Plan, which proposed roadway is intended to serve the public 
in lieu of the aforesaid way to be discontinued, is open to pedestrian 
and vehicular traffic and has been constructed so as to comply to 
applicable Town standards for a public way, and (ii) upon presentation of 
evidence satisfactory to the Board of Selectmen or other appropriate body 
that such new roadway is legally available to the public for such 
purposes, and to establish such other conditions relating to the 
aforesaid discontinuance as the Town may deem appropriate, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town hereby authorizes the Board of Selectmen to 
file a petition and to take such other steps as may be necessary or 
advisable to have the County Commissioners of Middlesex County 
discontinue the following street as a public way: 

a portion of Old Bedford Road beginning at the limit of 
said road as shown on the 1966 State Highway Layout No. 
5624 and running westerly to and including that portion of 
Old Bedford Road previously discontinued or conveyed by the 
Town of Lincoln pursuant to action taken under Article 6 of 
the May, 1980 Special Town Meeting, said portion of Old 
Bedford Road being more particularly shown and described on 
a plan of land entitled "Proposed Roadway Relocation and 
Discontinuance Plan of Old Bedford Road and Virginia Road 
in Lincoln, Mass.", dated February 23, 1987 and prepared by 
BSC-Bedford, scale: 1 inch = 80 feet (the "Roadway Plan"), 
a copy of which plan is available for inspection in the 
Town Hall and in the office of the Town Clerk, 

and that the Town also vote, to the extent of its interest in the 
aforesaid portion of Old Bedford Road, to discontinue the said portion as 
a public way and to authorize such conveyances or releases as may be 
necessary to fully vest in abutting owners all rights in and to the 
discontinued way, all such actions to be taken or made effective (i) upon 
certification by a majority of the Board of Selectmen that a proposed 
roadway located between the limit of the 1966 Old Bedford Road State 
Highway Layout No. 5624 and that portion of Virginia Road just south of 
Lot 5-7, now or formerly owned by the Massachusetts Port Authority, and 
also being more particularly shown on the Roadway Plan, which proposed 
roadway is intended to serve the public in lieu of the aforesaid way to 
be discontinued, is open to pedestrian and vehicular traffic and has been 
constructed so as to comply to applicable Town standards for a public 
way, (ii) upon presentation of evidence satisfactory to a majority of the 
Board of Selectmen that such new roadway is legally available to the 
public for such purposes, and (iii) upon receipt of indemnification or 
security satisfactory to a majority of the Selectmen regarding any 
charges or damages which the Town may become obliged to pay by reason of 
such discontinuance, in accordance with G.L. c. 82, Section 24. 



26 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the following 
street as a public way: 

a portion of Virginia Road from a point 50 feet south of 
the northeasterly corner of Lot 5-2, now or formerly owned 
by the Massachusetts Port Authority, to and including that 
portion of Virginia Road previously discontinued or 
conveyed by the Town of Lincoln pursuant to action taken 
under Article 6 of the May, 1980 Special Town Meeting, and 
being more particularly shown and described on a plan of 
land entitled "Proposed Roadway Relocation and 
Discontinuance Plan of Old Bedford Road and Virginia Road 
in Lincoln, Mass.", dated February 23, 1987, prepared by 
BSC-Bedford, scale: 1 inch - 80 feet (the "Roadway Plan"), 
a copy of which plan is available for inspection in the 
Town Hall and in the office of the Town Clerk, 

and to authorize such conveyances or releases as may be necessary to 
fully vest in abutting owners all rights in and to the discontinued way, 
all such actions to be taken or made effective (i) upon certification by 
the Board of Selectmen or other appropriate body that a proposed roadway 
located between the limit of the 1966 Old Bedford Road State Highway 
Layout No. 5624 and that portion of Virginia Road just south of Lot 5-7, 
now or formerly owned by the Massachusetts Port Authority, and being more 
particularly shown and described on the Roadway Plan, which proposed 
roadway is intended to serve the public in lieu of the aforesaid way to 
be discontinued, is open to pedestrian and vehicular traffic and has been 
constructed so as to comply with applicable Town standards for a public 
way, and (ii) upon presentation of evidence satisfactory to the Board of 
Selectmen or other appropriate body that such new roadway is legally 
available to the public for such purposes, and to establish such other 
conditions relating to the aforesaid discontinuance as the Town may deem 
appropriate, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to discontinue the following street as a 

public way: 

a portion of Virginia Road from a point 50 feet south of 
the northeasterly corner of Lot 5-2, now or formerly owned 
by the Massachusetts Port Authority, to and including that 
portion of Virginia Road previously discontinued or 
conveyed by the Town of Lincoln pursuant to action taken 
under Article 6 of the May, 1980 Special Town Meeting, and 
being more particularly shown and described on a plan of 
land entitled "Proposed Roadway Relocation and 
Discontinuance Plan of Old Bedford Road and Virginia Road 
in Lincoln, Mass.", dated February 23, 1987, prepared by 
BSC-Bedford, scale: 1 inch - 80 feet (the "Roadway Plan"), 
a copy of which plan is available for inspection in the 
Town Hall and in the office of the Town Clerk, 

and that the Town hereby authorizes such conveyances or releases as may 
by necessary to fully vest in abutting owners all rights in and to the 
discontinued way, all such actions to be taken or made effective (i) upon 
certification by a majority of the Board of Selectmen that a proposed 
roadway located between the limit of the 1966 Old Bedford Road State 
Highway Layout No. 5624 and that portion of Virginia Road just south of 
Lot 5-7, now or formerly owned by the Massachusetts Port Authority, and 
being more particularly shown and described on the Roadway Plan, which 
proposed roadway is intended to serve the public in lieu of the aforesaid 
way to be discontinued, is open to pedestrian and vehicular traffic and 
has been constructed so as to comply with applicable Town standards for a 



27 



public way, (11) upon presentation of evidence satisfactory to a majority 
of the Board of Selectmen that such new roadway Is legally available to 
the public for such purposes, and (111) upon receipt of indemnification 
or security satisfactory to a majority of the Selectmen regarding any 
charges or damages which the Town may become obliged to pay by reason of 
such discontinuance, in accordance with G.L. c. 82, Section 24. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to approve amendments to 

the bylaws of the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park which 
have been adopted by the Corporation revising the method of appointment 
of certain trustees of the Museum and making certain other housekeeping 
changes in the bylaws, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town approve amendments to the bylaws of the 
DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park which were adopted by vote of the 
members of the Corporation at a Special Meeting held March 3, 1987, said 
amendments being set forth in the copy of the bylaws entitled "Bylaws of 
DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park - 1987 Amendments" distributed at this 
meeting and filed with the Town Clerk. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will authorize the Conservation 

Commission and/or the Board of Selectmen to execute an 
instrument modifying an existing restriction against subdivision granted 
to the Town by Perry J. Culver and Kate S. Culver by an instrument dated 
December 19, 1977, recorded with Middlesex South Deeds in Book 13364, 
Page 44, affecting land on Baker Bridge Road, so as to permit the Culvers 
to retain as part of their present house lot a one-acre area currently 
used as their garden but originally part of an adjoining lot, subject, 
however, to the restriction that such area will not be used in order to 
create an additional building lot, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED ; (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
and/or the Selectmen to execute an instrument modifying an existing 
restriction against subdivision granted to the Town by Perry J. Culver 
and Kate S. Culver by an instrument dated December 19, 1977, recorded 
with Middlesex South Deeds in Book 13364, Page 44, affecting land on 
Baker Bridge Road, so as to permit the Culvers to retain as part of their 
present house lot a one-acre area currently used as their garden but 
originally part of an adjoining lot, subject, however, to the restriction 
that such area will not be used in order to create an additional building 
lot. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to appoint an ad hoc Land Bank Study Committee to 
examine the merits of the Town's adoption under general or special 
legislation of a land bank program, involving generally the collection of 
fees or charges on the transfer of real property to be held and used by 
the Town for the acquisition of land or for other public purposes, and to 
request the Study Committee to make recommendations to the Town regarding 
such further actions or steps as the committee deems advisable, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (By majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
appoint a Land Bank Study Committee to examine the merits of the Town's 
adoption under general or special legislation of a land bank program, 
involving generally the collection of fees or charges on the transfer of 
real property to be held and used by the Town for the acquisition of land 
or for other public purposes, and to request the Study Committee and the 
Selectmen to make recommendations to the Town at the next Annual Town 
Meeting regarding such further actions or steps as the Committee and the 
Selectmen deem appropriate. 



28 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 

of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof to be used by various departments 
for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see if the Town 
will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and 
equipment or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $26,000., said 
sum to be taken from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicles for the 
Police Department, and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by sale or 
otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 

borrowing or any combination thereof to lease and/or purchase equipment 

and vehicles for various Town departments, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$37,000. by taxation to lease and/or purchase equipment and vehicles for 

various Town departments. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 

maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action relative 

thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$10,225. by taxation for the repair and maintenance of certain Town 

buildings. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination thereof for the provision of additional 
Town inspectional services in connection with the affordable housing 
project in North Lincoln or other inspectional duties, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$35,000. by taxation for the provision of additional Town inspectional 
services in connection with the affordable housing and commercial 
projects in North Lincoln or other inspectional duties. 

An amendment to reduce the sum to was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be added to monies previously 
appropriated for the renovation of a house on Sunnyside Lane which is 
leased from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in order to provide 
subsidized housing to be administered by the Lincoln Housing Commission, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



29 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General Bylaws by 
striking out the existing Section 13 of Article XI entitled 
"Dog Regulations" in its entirety and adopting a new Section 13 as 
follows [changes underlined]: 

"Section 13. Animal Control Regulations 

Introductory Statement 

All citizens are entitled to fully enjoy their property and the public 
ways and lands. Those citizens who own or keep animals are entitled to 
enjoy their animals, but only to the extent that they exercise 
responsibility so that their animals do not unreasonably Impinge upon the 
activities of other persons. 

(a) No person shall keep in the Town any dog which, by 
biting, howling or excessive barking, or in any other 
manner, endangers the safety of any person or disturbs the 
peace or quiet of any neighborhood. 

(b) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be 
in any municipal building unless the dog is kept on a leash, 

(c) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be 
in a school building or on school grounds between thirty 
minutes before and thirty minutes after the hours when any 
school or recreaction program is in session, unless the 
cognizant authority otherwise specifically permits. 

(d) The dog officer shall order the restraint and/or 
muzzling for a period not to exceed thirty days, of any 
animal which the officer finds, after a complaint from an 
identified person or through the dog officer's observation, 
has: 

(1) Bitten or threatened the safety of any person; 

(2) Worried , killed or maimed any domesticated or farm 
animal; 

[(3) ...through end of (d) remains the same except for 
possible change of the word "dog" to animal.] 

(e) The owner or keeper of an animal who fails to comply 
with this bylaw, or with any order of the dog officer 
issued pursuant to the provisions of this bylaw, shall be 
subject to the following penalties: 

First offense: Maximum fine of $25 

Second offense: Maximum fine of $25 

Third offense: Maximum fine of $35 

Fourth and subsequent offenses: Maximum fine of 

*50 

In addition, for each offense, the owner or keeper of the animal shall be 
subject to the following charges: 

Remimbursement to the dog officer of the officer's expenses for 
maintaining the animal , if the dog officer finds it necessary to impound 
the animal until its owner or keeper can be found. Such expenses must be 
paid prior to release of the impounded animal. 



30 



Before release of an unlicensed dog is made by the dog officer, the 
officer shall require that a license be secured. A late fee of .5 dollars 
shall be paid to the Town, in addition to the regular license fee, in 
such instance." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to amend the General Bylaws by striking 
out the existing Section 13 of Article XI entitled "Dog Regulations" in 
its entirety and adopting a new Section 13 as follows : 

Section 13. Animal Control Regulations 

Introductory Statement 

All citizens are entitled to fully enjoy their property and 
the public ways and lands. Those citizens who own or keep 
animals are entitled to enjoy their animals, but only to 
the extent that they exercise responsibility so that their 
animals do not unreasonably impinge upon the activities of 
other persons. 

(a) No person shall keep in the Town any dog which, by 
biting, howling or excessive barking, or in any other 
manner, endangers the safety of any person or disturbs the 
peace or quiet of any neighborhood. 

(b) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be 
in any municipal building unless the dog is kept on a leash, 

(c) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be 
in a school building or on school grounds between thirty 
minutes before and thirty minutes after the hours when any 
school or recreation program is in session, unless the 
cognizant authority otherwise specifically permits. 

(d) The dog officer shall order the restraint and/or 
muzzling for a period not to exceed thirty days, of any 
animal which the officer finds, after a complaint from an 
identified person or through the dog officer's observation, 
has: 

(1) Bitten or threatened the safety of any person; 

(2) Worried, killed, or maimed any domesticated or 
farm animal; 

(3) Chased any motor, recreational or pedal vehicle, 
or any animal carrying or drawing a person upon 
any public or traveled way; 

(4) Damaged property; 

(5) Committed any act which places its owner or 
keeper inviolation of a prior subsection of this 
bylaw. 

The second time the dog officer issues a restraining or 
muzzling order regarding the same animal on account of a 
repeated offense under this subsection, the dog officer 
shall notify the Selectmen in writing so that they may take 
any further action. 



31 



The owner or keeper of any animal that has been ordered to 
be restrained or muzzled under the provisions of this 
subsection may request the Selectmen in writing to vacate 
such order. 

(e) The owner or keeper of an animal who fails to comply 
with this bylaw, shall be subject to the following 
penalties : 

First offense: Maximum fine of £25 

Second offense: Maximum fine of £25 

Third offense: Maximum fine of £35 

Fourth and subsequent offenses: Maximum fine of £50 

In addition, for each offense, the owner or keeper of the 
animal shall be subject to the following charges: 

Reimbursement to the dog officer of the officer's expenses 
for maintaining the animal, if the dog officer finds it 
necessary to impound the animal until its owner or keeper 
can be found. Such expenses must be paid prior to release 
of the impounded animal. 

Before release of an unlicensed dog is made by the dog 
officer, the officer shall require that a license be 
secured. A late fee of 5 dollars shall be paid to the 
Town, in addition to the regular license fee, in such 
Instance. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination thereof to relocate one or more of the 
single family residential structures located along Old Bedford and 
Virginia Roads and indentified on the Lincoln Assessors' maps as Map 
4-Parcel 11, Map 5-Parcel 8, Map 5-Parcel 9.01, Map 5-Parcel 9 and Map 
6-Parcel 3, which structures are proposed to be donated to the Town by 
the owner thereof for the purpose of providing subsidized housing, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 

resolution opposing the interbasin transfer of surface 
waters of the Sudbury River. 

Whereas, the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) 
has proposed that surface waters of the Sudbury River 
Watershed be transferred outside of that watershed, 
specifically for the use of MWRA community users, and 

Whereas the diversion will Impair the quantity and quality 
of the waters of both the Sudbury and the Concord Rivers, 
and 

Whereas, those rivers are a resource which is depended on 
by local cities and towns for municipal and individual 
wells, for recreation, for wildlife and for renewal of 
wetlands, and 



32 



Whereas, the Sudbury and Concord Rivers are used by people 
from throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Including Metropolitan Boston, for recreation, and for 
scenic and historical purposes, and contain the sites of 
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, and Old North 
Bridge at Minuteman National Historical Park, and 

Whereas, the proposed transfer of waters outside the 
Sudbury River Basin will have both immediate and long term 
negative effects on the Sudbury River and the Concord River 
for the above named resources, and 

Whereas the state and the MWRA have not yet pursued 
alternative measures, including conservation, leak 
detection, and metering, and the proposal to divert water 
is premature and unnecessary, and 

Whereas, a reasonable flow in the Sudbury River has not 
been guaranteed, 

Therefore, the 1987 Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, resolves to declare its opposition 
to transfer of the surface waters of the Sudbury Watershed, 
and authorizes the Selectmen to communicate such opposition 
and to take other action to oppose such transfer as may be 
necessary. 

VOTED ; (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to adopt the following resolution 

opposing the interbasin transfer of surface waters of the Sudbury River: 

Whereas, the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) 
has proposed that surface waters of the Sudbury River 
Watershed be transferred outside of that watershed, 
specifically for the use of MWRA community users, and 

Whereas the diversion will impair the quantity and quality 
of the waters of both the Sudbury and Concord Rivers, and 

Whereas, those rivers are a resource which is depended on 
by local cities and towns for municipal and individual 
wells, for recreation, for wildlife and for renewal of 
wetlands, and 

Whereas, the Sudbury and Concord Rivers are used by people 
from throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Including Metropolitan Boston, for recreation, and for 
scenic and historical purposes, and contain the sites of 
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, and Old North 
Bridge at Minuteman National Historical Park, and 

Whereas, the proposed transfer of waters outside the 
Sudbury River Basin will have both immediate and long term 
negative effects on the Sudbury River and the Concord River 
for the above named resources, and 

Whereas the state and the MWRA have not yet pursued 
alternative measures, including conservation, leak 
detection, and metering, and the proposal to divert water 
is premature and unnecessary, and 

whereas, a reasonable flow in the Sudbury River has not 
been guaranteed, 



33 



Therefore, the 1987 Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, resolves to declare its opposition 
to transfer of the surface waters of the Sudbury Watershed, 
and authorizes the Selectmen to communicate such opposition 
and to take other action to oppose such transfer as may be 
necessary. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to forward the following 
resolution to the elected representatives of the Town: 



VOTED: 



"Be it resolved, that, in order to reduce the threat of 

nuclear war, the governments of the United States and the 

Soviet Union should adopt a mutual, simultaneous, and 

verifiable moratorium on the testing of nuclear warheads, 

as a first step towards a world-wide cessation of nuclear 

testing." 

(By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to forward the following resolution to 

the elected representatives of the Town: 



Be it resolved, that, in order to reduce the threat of 
nuclear war, the governments of the United States and the 
Soviet Union should adopt a mutual, simultaneous, and 
verifiable moratorium on the testing of nuclear warheads, 
as a first step towards a world-wide cessation of nuclear 
testing. 



At various stages of the Meeting, 
officers, as follows: 



tribute was paid to several retiring 



To Lawrence Thompson and David Elwood, retiring from the 
Finance Committee after 9 and 6 years of service 
respectively. 

To Ray Clark of Sudbury, who retired from the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Committee after 4 
years of service. 

To Paula Bennett and Ruth Ann Hendrickson retiring from the 
School Committee after 6 and 3 years of service 
respectively. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously voted to dissolve the Meeting at 4:30 p.m. 



Nancy J. Zuelke 
Town Clerk 



3 '-* 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 30, 1987 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, 
the polls were declared open at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy Zuelke. 
The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke throughout the day: Charlotte 
Donaldson, Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, Margaret Flint, Alice Garrison, 
William G. Langton, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert, Fred J. 
Wilfert. The polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. 
There was a total vote of 467, with 164 in Precinct 1 and 303 in Precinct 
2, with the following results: 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Moderator (3 yrs.) 


David M. Donaldson 
Blanks 


141 

23 

164 


282 

21 

303 


423 

44 

467 


Town Clerk (1 yr.) 


Nancy J. Zuelke 
Blanks 


147 

17 

164 


280 

23 

303 


427 

40 
467 


Board of Selectmen 
(3 yrs.) 


Susan C. Fargo 
Blanks 


148 

16 

164 


274 

29 

303 


422 

45 

467 


Town Treasurer 
(1 yr.) 


Roy M. Raja 
Blanks 


135 

29 

164 


267 

36 
303 


402 

65 

467 


Board of Assessors 
(3 yrs.) 


Douglas M. Burckett 
Blanks 


137 

27 

164 


259 

44 

303 


396 

71 

467 


School Committee (2) 
(3 yrs.) 


Sarah G. Bobitt 
Melissa P. Hodgson 
Wendy Kameny 
Scattering 
Blanks 


112 
31 

115 

2 

68 

328 


184 
71 
202 

149 
606 


296 
102 
317 
2 
217 
934 


Water Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 


Leona G. Champ eny 
Blanks 


141 

23 

164 


260 

43 

303 


401 

66 

467 


Board of Health 
(3 yrs.) 


Perry J. Culver MD 
Blanks 


148 

16 

164 


273 

30 
303 


421 

46 

367 


Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 


Marjorie L. Holland 
Blanks 


139 

25 

164 


265 

38 

303 


404 

63 

467 


Planning Board 
(5 yrs.) 


Warren F. Flint, Jr. 
Blanks 


147 

17 

164 


284 

19 

303 


431 

36 

467 


Planning Board 
(3 yrs.) 


Margery P. Collins 
Blanks 


138 

26 

16* 


263 
40 

3U3 


401 

66 

767 



35 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Commissioner of Trust 


William P. Russell 


142 


269 


411 


Funds (3 yrs. ) 


Blanks 


22 


34 


56 






164 


303 


467 


Trustee of Bemis Fund 


John Curtis Perry 


138 


262 


400 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


26 
164 


41 
303 


67 
467 


Trustee DeCordova 


Lynn A. Gargill 


138 


257 


395 


Museum (3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


26 
164 


46 
303 


72 
467 


Housing Commission (2) 


Giles C. Browne 


134 


256 


390 


(2 yrs.) 


Blanks 


30 
164 


47 
303 


77 
467 


Recreation Committee 


Elizabeth K. Evans 


147 


259 


406 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


17 


44 


61 






164 


303 


467 


Lincoln-Sudbury 


David Pettit 


120 


217 


337 


Regional H.S. (2) 
(3 yrs.) 


Phyllis Rappaport 

Scattering 

Blanks 


141 

2 

65 


254 
135 


395 

2 

200 






328 


606 


934 


Question 1 


"Shall the Town of 


Lincoln be 


allowed to 


assess 



an additional $137,629 in real estate and 
personal property taxes for the fiscal year 
beginning July first, nineteen hundred and 
eighty-seven?" 



Yes 


116 


227 


343 


No 


35 


65 


100 


Blanks 


13 


11 


24 




164 


303 


467 



Question 2 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt 
from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so-called, the amount required to pay 
for the bond issued in order to close and cap 
the municipal landfill?" 



Yes 


128 


241 


369 


No 


29 


53 


82 


Blanks 


7 


9 


16 




164 


303 


467 



Question 3 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt 
from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so-called, the amount required to pay 
for the bond issued in order to perform repairs 
and renovations to the Lincoln Public School 
buildings?" 



Yes 


134 


253 


387 


No 


24 


45 


69 


Blanks 


6 


5 


11 




164 


303 


467 



36 



Question 4 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt 

from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so-called, the amount required to pay 
for the bond issued in order to construct a 
bathhouse facility at the Codman Pool?" 

Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 



Yes 


111 


205 


316 


No 


49 


93 


142 


Blanks 


4 
164 


5 

303 


9 
467 



Question 5 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt 

from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so-called, the amount required to pay 
for the bond issued in order to repair, 
remodel, and purchase equipment for the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School 
building?" 



Yes 


125 


244 


369 


No 


32 


51 


83 


Blanks 


7 
164 


8 
303 


15 
467 



Question 6 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt 

from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so-called, the amount required to pay 
for the bond issued in order to reconstruct and 
make improvements to outdoor recreational and 
athletic facilities, roads and parking lots at 
the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School?" 



Yes 


118 


228 


346 


No 


39 


71 


110 


Blanks 


7 


4 


110 




164 


303 


467 



Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk 



37 





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39 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 



Perpetual Care Funds at June 30, 1986 

Paid to Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 
for maintenance of lots 

Perpetual Care Funds at 7/1/86 

Income received 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 



8,180.13 



Accumulated income at June 30, 1987 

Cash and Investments at June 30, 1987 

Middlesex Savings Bank, Income Account 
Middlesex Savings Bank, Perpetual Care Funds 
Investment Certificate to mature 8/13/87 

TOTAL 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



I 17,512.27 
550.00 

10,490.40 
t 28,552.67 

11,040.40 

17,512.27 

i 28,552.67 



June 30 


, 1987 


Mildred Ballou 


$ 500.00 


Julia A. Bemis 


300.00 


William W. Benjamin 


500.00 


Bethany, Order of St. Anne 


1,000.00 


Marie H. Bisbee 


200.00 


Mildred E. Bowles 


200.00 


Agnes L. Brown 


300.00 


George Browning 


200.00 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


John H. Cantlin 


100.00 


Elizabeth G. Chapin 


300.00 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


William N. Costello 


100.00 


Mary H. Cushing 


100.00 


Anthony J. Doherty 


500.00 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


Charles P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


Frances Flint 


250.00 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


Raymond E. Haggerty 


150.00 


George Harrington 


100.00 


Samuel Hartwell 


300.00 


Thomas Huddleston 


200.00 


Abijah G. Jones 


300.00 


M. Gertrude Kelley 


300.00 


John J. Kelliher 


200.00 


Byron Lunt 


300.00 


Donald Millard 


550.00 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


Lena M. Newell 


325.00 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 


Charles 0. Preble 


100.00 



40 



Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

£. H. Rogers 250.00 

F. B. Sargent 200.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. & Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

J. S. Wible 100.00 

$18,062.27 



41 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1987 

120,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.65%, due $20,000 each 

April 1, 1988-93, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 
the G. L. 
10,000 Conservation Land Loan, 8.875%, due $10,000 each May 

15, 1988, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G.L. 
10,000 Codman Complex Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000 each Sept. 15, 
1987-88. 
110,000 Energy Conservation Loan, 7.80%, due $25,000 each 
Dec. 1, 1987-88, and due $20,000 each Dec. 1, 
1989-91, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 
1,050,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.25%, due $150,000 each 
April 1, 1988-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 
the G. L. 
70,000 Codman Housing Loan, 7.25%, due $10,000 each April 1, 
1988-94, issued under Ch. 359, Acts of 1979 of the 
G.L. 
615,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.60%, due $80,000 each Nov. 
15, 1987-89 and due $75,000 each Nov. 15, 1990-94, 
issued 
under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 

1,985,000 TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 



1,985,000 NET DEBT 



70,000 Water Loan, 5.20%, due $15,000 each August 1, 

1987-90, and due $10,000 Aug. 1, 1991, issued under 

Ch.44,S.8(5). 
45,000 Water Loan, 4.65%, due $15,000 each April 1, 

1988-90, issued under Ch. 44, S. 8(5). 
650,000 Water Loan, 7.80%, due $90,000 each Dec. 1, 1987, 

and due $80,000 each Dec. 1, 1988-94. 



765,000 TOTAL WATER BONDS 



2,750,000 TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



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51 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Joseph W. Howard (resigned) 
Robert L. Jenal (appointed) 
Paul E. Marsh 
Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

With gratitude for his many years of most helpful participation and 
appreciation for his wish to retire from public service, the Board of 
Assessors has accepted the resignation of Joseph W. Howard. For a dozen 
years and more, he was both a genial colleague and an important 
contributor to the function of the Board. Robert L. Jenal replaces Joe; 
we welcome him. 

Long-time readers of the Valuation Lists will note that Mrs. Helen 
Ryan, Clerk to the Board, has, among other things, consolidated real 
estate values and taxes of those who own several pieces of property in 
Town, thus enhancing the ease of making comparisons on which serious 
students of these lists thrive. 

As has been the case in the last few years, values escalated between 
January, 1986 and January, 1987. The real estate boom was still going 
strong fifteen months ago. This escalation had two results for property 
owners. The first was that careful analysis by the Board led to the con- 
clusion that all land on some streets had been assigned inappropriate 
values. These values depend on comparing what people prove willing to pay 
for property on these streets with what the Board had judged its value to 
be. In boom times — like those just past — the assessed values turned 
out to be too low in a number of cases. Consequently, the Board voted to 
assign uniformly higher values to land on certain streets as well as to 
vacant lands which cannot legally be built on because of zoning or conser- 
vation restrictions. The owners of these properties — some 491 parcels 
— were sent impact notices noting the changes and the owner's right to 
con- test them. 

The second result of the escalation of selling prices during 1986 was 
to indicate that the general value of all property in Lincoln had 
increased by nearly 30% in the course of the year. The Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue, as it does for all municipalities, reviewed the 
Board's sales and assessment records and its analysis of those records; 
and it approved an increase of 26% for all values assessed on Individual 
properties and of 15% for all condominiums. These increases in values 
were reflected in the tax bills sent out last fall. 

Items of assessing regulations you should be familiar with: 

1) The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of 
its value in any year. 

2) All real estate and personal tax abatement applications must 
be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year involved or 
within 30 days after the date of mailing of the tax bill. 

3) Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by December 31 of the year suc- 
ceeding the year involved. If cars are changed during the 
year, it is the taxpayer's responsibility to file an abate- 
ment application. 



52 



4) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General Laws, as 
amended, provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for 
taxpayers who meet certain age, financial, etc., qualifica- 
tions. Additional information may be obtained from the 
Assessors' Office. All applications under Clause 41 must be 
filed by December 15 of the year involved. 

5) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A provides for the deferral 
of real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. All 
applications under this clause must be filed by December 15 
of the year involved. 

6) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple Heart 
awards, and others, may qualify for a partial exemption. 
Additional information may be obtained from the Assessors' 

■ Office. 



53 



1987-88 RECAPITULATION 



Amount to be raised by Taxation 



Valuation and Tax Rate 



Real Estate 



Residential 
Open Space 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 
Total Valuation 






629,912, 

16,800, 

9,006, 

- - 

8,753, 

664,473, 


,700 
,800 
,700 

,300 
,500 




Tax Rate per Thousand 
School rate 
General rate 


(1987- 


88) 


$9.08 
$4.20 
$4.88 








REAL 


ESTATE SUMMARY 




Property Description 
Residential-single 
dwelling unit 


No 


. of 


Parcels 
1387 




Assessed Value 
Jan. 1, 1987 
553,636,200 


Condominiums 






188 




50,101,700 


Residential - two or 
more dwelling units 






7 




12,380,400 


Part commercial / 
Part residential 






7 




2,435,800 


Commercial 






17 




7,623,300 


Land classified under Ch 
Agricultural 


61, 61A, 


& 6 IB 
18 




1,891,700 



Part residential/ 
Part agricultural 
Recreational 

Conservation Restriction 

Vacant Land 



84 
254 



2,191,500 
2,277,500 



54 



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55 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of activites of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the year 1987: 

Motor Vehicle Enforcement and Investigations: 

Accidents investigated 415 

Accidents with injury 120 

Fatal accidents 1 

Traffic citations issued 923 

Criminal Law Enforcement and Investigations: 

Crimes reported and investigated: 

Break and entry 22 

Larceny 80 

Stolen cars, bikes 14 

Narcotic law violations 12 

Ordinance violations 49 

Vandalism 60 

Disturbances 89 

Domestic disputes/civil problems 95 

Reports of attempted crimes 7 

Non-classified responses 63 

Arrests, motor vehicle and criminal 125 

Miscellaneous Activities: 

Response to alarms 644 

Suspicious activity 60 

Animal complaints 135 

Ambulance runs 315 

Assist to other police agencies 86 

Total calls logged 13,563 

As the traffic flow increases through Lincoln we find ourselves 
facing new enforcement challenges in the area of motor vehicle law. 
Although most criminal activity reports declined during 1987 compared to 
1986, a disturbing statistic shows an increase in reports of damage to 
property (vandalism). 

In the area of personnel, we had a retirement from the Communications 
Department with long-time employee William Whalen, Sr. retiring after many 
years of Service. As his replacement, Mr. Richard McCarty of Lexington was 
hired. 



support 



Once again we extend our thanks to the community for its continued 
t and to our fellow town employees for their cooperation. 



56 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire Department 
for the year 1987: 



Runs 



Response to motor vehicle accidents 160 

Airport runs (Hanscom) 56 

Ambulance runs/transports 524 

Brush fires 16 

Building fires 6 

Box alarms, building 67 

False alarms received 109 

Investigations 100 

Lock-outs (vehicle & home) 165 

Car fires 22 

Mutual aid responses 53 
Reports of outside burning (w/o permit) 13 

Special services 58 

Water problems 67 

Reports of wires down and/or arcing 32 

Other Activities: 

Burning permits issued 694 

Fire alarm boxes tested 54 

School fire drills 13 

Inspections: Schools 10 

Mercantile buildings 12 

Town buildings 4 

Smoke detectors 90 

Wood stoves 18 

Oil burner/tanks 20 

Fire alarm 5 

Fire prevention 10 

During the year we saw the retirement of Call Captain William 
Dean after fifty years of dedicated service to the community. 
Unfortunately we also experienced the loss of several members of the 
call department who found they could not continue service; this loss 
only added to the potential manning problems foreseen for the future 
- we hope to supplement the department in the immediate future. 

We would continue to urge the community to buy and install 
smoke detectors - a real life saving device. Once again, we thank 
the community for their support and express appreciation to our 
fellow town employees for their contributions to our efforts. 



PARKING CLERK 

Lorraine Dean 

Number of tickets issued: 111 

Fines paid: 85 

Fines unpaid: 26 

Percentage paid (approximately): 77% 

Total money taken In for the year 1987 $470.00 



57 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

Thomas B. Moran, Director 

The Lincoln Civil Defense and Emergency Preparedness organization 
provides a link to the State Civil Defense for physical and fiscal 
assistance in preparing for and responding to emergencies. 
At the local level we maintain a roster of local people and their skills 
who can help during emergencies. We presently have 20 people on our 
roster and we welcome others. 

An active part of the Lincoln effort has been conducted by 
Communications Officers Curtis Risley and his assistant John Solman. 
They have organized bi-monthly radio drills with Lincoln amateur radio 
operators. Lincoln continues to be the Sector 1C net control station 
managing an amateur radio network that link 16 neighboring towns to each 
other and to the Sector headquarters in Tewksbury. 

As a part of our emergency planning effort, we participated in the 
Eastern Massachusetts Simulated Emergency Test (SET) which was held on 
Saturday, November 21. The subject of the SET was planning for the 
Blizzard of '88 (remember the one in '78?). Five of our radio operators 
participated in a telephone-backup net. A requirement of the drill was 
to operate without commercial power using either portable or mobile 
radios. 

This and previous drills have emphasized the need for modest outside 
antennas to permit local communication with low power. This is 
especially important for extended operation from batteries such as is 
required during a long power outage or for portable operation at field 
locations. 

Radio License classes and practical training in the radio art 
continue to be a part of our program. A recent change in the Federal 
Communications Commission rules provides for new radio privileges for the 
Novice (beginner's) radio license. We plan to repeat our Novice license 
class for those who already hold a Novice radio license. The purpose of 
this session will be to assist in upgrading to a higher class license and 
will include some "hands on training" in radio operating practice. 
Please contact Curt or John for information on the classes. 

To better include Novice operators in our radio nets, we are 
building a radio repeater for their voice radios that operate in the 220 
MHz band. The repeater will be located with other Town radio equipment. 
Due to the Town's budget squeeze, the repeater is being built by private 
funding and donations of equipment. As of this date, a frequency 
assignment for the unit has been obtained and all of the major items of 
equipment are on hand or in construction. The unit will have battery 
backup for several days of operation during a power outage. 

We would like to thank the many townspeople who have contributed 
money, equipment and time for the construction of the repeater. We would 
also welcome assistance from anyone who would like to learn by assisting 
in the assembly and test of the unit. We have a few chores to 
share-mechanical skills would would be appreciated. 



58 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Commissioner 

Courtney Atkinson, Assistant Wiring and Building Inspector 

Kenneth Desmond, Electrical and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Jr. , Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

James Sullivan, Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Earl Midgley, Special Assistant to the Building Commissioner 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 



Construction values as submitted by applicants increased by one 
million, six hundred and forty-two thousand dollars ($1,642,000) over the 
calendar year 1986. Permits collected for the 1987 calendar year totalled 
$46,849.00. 

We welcome two additional inspectors to our staff - Earl Midgley 
and Russell Dixon, Jr. Earl will be on a part time basis aiding the 
department when the North Lincoln Housing Development begins this spring. 
Russell Dixon, Jr. is the son of our regular gas and plumbing inspector. 
He will also be a "back-up" whenever necessary. Welcome to the staff, 
gentlemen. 



Statistics for the year are as follows: 

Values as submitted by applicants — 

Building $5,778,374.00 

Plumbing 332,620.00 

Electrical 270,749.00 

Permits issued — 

New Residential 5 

Aircraft Terminal Building 1 

Public Bathhouse 1 

Additions and Remodelling 69 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 17 

Swimming Pools 2 

Greenhouses 2 

Reroofing 15 

Tent 8 (Temporary) 6 

Signs 3 

Woodburning Stoves 14 

Fences 1 

Fire Alarms 5 

Recertifications of Buildings 11 

Tennis Courts 1 

Accessory Apartments 2 

Total 140 

Permit fees collected — 

Building $26,661.00 

Plumbing 7,501.00 

Electrical 12,247 00 

Fire Alarms 50.00 

Woodburning Stoves 350.00 

Recertifications 40.00 

Total 46,849.00 



59 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 

The General Laws of Massachusetts requires that all devices used 
for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately checked and certified 
by "SEALS" at least once each year. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1987, and ending December 31, 
1987, inclusive, in compliance with Section 37, Chapter 98, General Laws 
as amended, the following number of devices have been certified: 

Scales sealed 30 

Gasoline meters sealed 24 

Total 54 

Sealing fees collected $273. 20 

Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed require repairs or adjustments. 

Any questions regarding weights and measures should be submitted to 
the Sealer of Weights and Measures at the Town Offices Building. 



60 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Perry Culver, Chairman 

Dr. John O'Loughlin, Vice-Chairman 

Dr. George Faddoul, Secretary 

Agents for the Board: 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 
Frank C. Emmons, Engineer 
John J. Devine, Sanitarian 
Jane Barnet, Animal Inspector 

Local Boards of Health in Massachusetts are required by state 
statutes and regulations to perform many important and crucial duties 
relative to the protection of public health, the control of disease, the 
promotion of sanitary living conditions, and the protection of the 
environment from damage and pollution. In addition to required duties, 
local boards of health are authorized to promulgate supplemental 
regulations which extend the board's authority over a broad range of 
health, sanitation, and environmental problems. These requirements reflect 
the Legislature's understanding that many critical health problems are best 
handled by the involvement of local community officials familiar with local 
conditions. 

The Board of Health meets at least once monthly and more often if 
there is work that cannot be completed within the reasonable time of three 
and one-half hours devoted to a single meeting. In March of 1987 Palmer 
Collins resigned as Administrative Assistant and Jane Barnet was appointed. 

Reports of Board Activities 

1. Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

This included conducting examinations of sites for sewage and septage 
disposal, issuing permits, inspecting and approving installation of 
equipment, holding hearings, granting variances, etc. Summary of 
activities is as follows: 

Site investigations witnessed (i.e., percolation tests 

and test pits) 32 

New disposal systems inspected and approved 6 

Repaired disposal systems inspected and approved 20 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 5 

Installers permits Issued 16 

Septage handlers equipment inspected and licenses issued 5 

2. Sanitarian Inspections: 

The Board hired a new Sanitarian, John Devine, when Sanitarian Steve 
Calichman resigned this fall. The Board enforced local health regulations 
according to Chapter X of the State Sanitary Code. Regular inspections of 
food service establishments were performed during the year including 
restaurants and food service facilities in stores, schools, institutions, 
farm stands, and permits were issued. The Codman Pool and the new bathhouse 
were also inspected by the Sanitarian. In addition, the Sanitarian Is 
responsible for investigating houses used as dormitories for handicapped 
individuals as well as answer complaints from citizens on possible food 
contamination. 

61 



3. School Health Program: 

The school health program aims to promote and protect the health of 
students, encourage a better understanding of bodily functions, and the 
development of healthy lifestyles. The services provide for early 
identification of illness or injuries, emergency treatment, and prompt 
referral to an appropriate medical facility as necessary. This year a 
large number of bee stings was cause of concern to the health staff, and 
Dr. O'Loughlin made suggestions as to how allergic reactions should be 
handled. The health services in the Lincoln Public Schools are provided 
through a contractural arrangement with the Emerson Hospital Home Care. 
There is also close coordination with Lois Taylor, Director of Pupil 
Services. 

Personnel with assigned responsibilities are as follows: 

Denise Sheeran, Director, Emerson Home Care Services 

Kathy Myers, School Nurse 

Anne Mahoney, School Health Aide 

Cynthia Bouchard, School Health Aide 

Toby Nathan, M.D., School Physician 

4. Summary of Emerson Hospital Home Care Service Activities: 

Home visits are provided under contract by the Home Care Department. 
The home visits numbered twenty-three this year as opposed to nine in 
1986. Hospitals, under pressure from Medicare and cost constraint 
controls, are releasing patients earlier, and they therefore require more 
home care. It is expected these people continue their convalescence under 
Home Health Care in Lincoln. Although telephone communications have been 
substituted for visits whenever circumstances permitted, the sicker 
patients require more home visits. The Department provided 590.42 hours to 
the school nurse program and supervised the annual influenza program where 
163 individuals received the recommended flu vaccine. 

5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This health facility provides services to Lincoln residents and 
includes an outpatient clinic, geriatric, mental retardation, and 
therapeutic preschool program. Services were provided to more than 120 
Lincoln residents in 1987. These services are partially paid for by 
contributions from nine participating towns. Lincoln's contribution to the 
Mental Health Center in 1987 was $5,000.00, reduced from $6,300.00 in 1986 
because of financial restraints. 

6. Report of the East Middlesex Control Project: 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a program in 
Lincoln consisting of mosquito and wetland surveillance, water management 
and public education. 

The goal of the survey program is to target mosquito breeding areas 
and to measure changes in the adult mosquito population caused by weather. 
Adult mosquito populations are monitored regularly at three sites around 
the town. This data aids the Project in determining the need for and 
impacts of control. The State Public Health utilizes some of this data as 
part of an effort to monitor those species associated with Eastern 
Encephalitis. 



62 



Most water management undertaken by the Project occurs in woodland 
swamps or marshes which are irregularly flooded following the spring 
snowmelt or after a substantial rain in the summer. Since most mosquitoes 
affecting Lincoln residents breed in these irregularly flooded wetlands, 
the goal of water management is to reduce the amount of area where stagnant 
water covers the surface of a wetland or to reduce the runoff time needed 
to drain off this stagnant water. This is accomplished by identifying 
ditches within these wetlaneds which are blocked by fallen trees, road 
sand, or sediment. Project crews clear the blockages and restore the 
original gradient to the ditch. In 1987, crews completed a substantial 
amount of ditch maintenance. Approximately 3,500' of ditch was cleared 
behind Browning Lane. Several culverts which were blocked by debris were 
maintained at several locations around town including along Route 2, at the 
Codman North Conservation area, and at a wetland adjacent to Route 126 near 
Cedar Road. Hanscom Air Force Base provided funding for ditch maintenance 
at wetlands near the base. In 1987 crews cleared 1,890' of Hobbs Brook 
near Mill Street. 

Educational pamphlets are available through the Board of Health on 
"Personal Protection From Mosquitoes", "How to Prevent Mosquitoes From 
Breeding Around the Yard and Home", and "Information on Eastern 
Encephalitis". A press release informing residents how to prevent 
mosquitoes from breeding on their property was distributed to local 
newspapers. 

The Project carried out a survey in the East Middlesex District to 
determine whether the tick species, Ixodes dammini, which is the vector for 
Lyme disease, was present. Since the survey did not produce any ticks of 
this species, it can be assumed that Lyme disease does not pose a 
significant threat to residents. 

The Eastern Middlesex Control Project is now making available a safe 
biological mosquito larvicide, BTi. A public hearing was held to inform 
townspeople of this new development. As desirable as this would be, the 
question is whether the Town of Lincoln, given its financial constraints, 
can afford the distribution of this larvicide from helicopters and hand 
dispensers. 

David M. Henley, Superintendent 

East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project 

7. Enforcement of Article VI of the State Sanitary Code: 

This includes issuing annual permits, conducting inspections, holding 
hearings, granting variances, and the taking of water samples, etc. The 
Codman Pool is owned by the Town of Lincoln, and is available to all 
residents and employees of the Town. The construction of the bathhouse 
brought Codman Pool into compliance with the State Regulations. 

8. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

The animal inspector's responsibilities are to supply the 
Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of Animal 
Health, with a list of animal owners, the number of livestock, and general 
health of animals in the town. A compilation of the 1987 animal census is 
as follows: 

Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 36 
Number of Beef Herds ( " " " " ) 23 
Number of Horses 67 

Number of Ponies 8 

Number of Goats 3 

Number of Sheep 134 

Number of Swine 6 



63 



If complaints arise with regard to health or care of any livestock, 
the animal Inspector investigates the circumstances in accordance with the 
laws and regulations relating to animal health. 

Each spring the Board of Health sponsors a rabies clinic for dogs 
owned by Lincoln residents. In 1987 thirty-five dogs were vaccinated 
against rabies during clinic hours held on June 6th. All dogs vaccinated 
between 3-12 months of age last year should be vaccinated again this year. 
A booster shot is then recommended every three years. Pet owners should 
consult with their local veterinarian about the need of rabies and feline 
leukemia immunization for cats. 

9. Concerns of the Board for the Future: 

Preservation of the quality and purity of the drinking water and 
ground water is of greatest concern to the Board. The Aquifer Study 
Committee is providing, through its questionnaire (sent to all residents 
with the census forms) and other work, valuable information which will be 
used for establishing new regulations regarding underground oil and 
gasoline tanks. 

A second concern is the disposition of household hazardous wastes. 
With the exception of 1987 there has been an annual Hazardous Waste Day 
sponsored by the League of Women Voters. Continuation of this is 
absolutely necessary. Attendance at these Hazardous Waste Day collections 
is nowhere near the majority of households. We wonder what happens to the 
hazardous waste. Is it being illegally dumped on the ground where it will 
eventually get into the ground water or is it being hidden in trash and 
dumped into the Transfer Station, from which it then is taken to the NESWC 
(New England Solid Waste Committee) facility? If any hazardous waste is 
discovered by NESWC it will result in substantial cost to the town. All 
citizens should be aware of acceptable and unacceptable items for the 
Transfer Station. A list of these items is available at the Board of 
Health Office. 

10. Landfill and Transfer Station: 

D.E.Q.E. approval for the construction and operation of our temporary 
transfer station stipulated that landfill closure and construction of a 
permanent transfer station be accomplished In accordance with a specific 
timetable, i.e. landfill closure was to have been completed by the end of 
the 1987 construction season. "Operation of the temporary transfer station 
shall not continue beyond December 1988." 

Final plans for landfill closure are complete and ready for 
submission to D.E.Q.E. Preliminary plans for transfer station upgrade are 
being formalized for presentation to the 1988 annual town meeting. 
Articles to provide funding for: 

-Landfill closure construction. 

-Transfer station final design and construction. (These will appear 

in the 1988 annual town meeting warrant). 



64 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Charlotte Barnaby 

Marian Cook 

William Davis, Vice Chairman 

Shirley Drew 

Mary Ford, Secretary-Treasurer 

John Garrison 

Sally Mansfield 

Ruth Morey 

William Poisson 

Ann Satterfield 

Ai re-Mai ja Schwann 

Ann Paddock, Chairperson 

The Greying of America is evident in Lincoln. The over sixty age 
group continues to grow and increased need for the services provided by the 
Council on Aging has been experienced. Of special interest has been the 
increase of people over eighty-five who seek help and advice from the 
Council regarding living needs and transportation. 

Our activities are well publicized in our monthly newsletter mailed to 
all residents eleven times a year. There are clinics - blood pressure, 
podiatric, hearing tests and flu shots. Classes in bridge, line dancing 
and exercise; programs (bi-weekly Coffee and Conversation); special monthly 
programs on various topics and monthly bus trips are available for those so 
interested. An Income Tax Assistance Program for our elderly citizens is 
available for both Federal and State Income Taxes. 

To help fill the needs of our elderly for transportation, our taxi 
service, limited to medical purposes and our local van for in-town errands 
and activities at Bemis Hall are available. We are trying out a monthly 
van trip to Concord for errands. During the year, an emergency call list 
was prepared whereby all elderly people may be contacted in case of 
emergency. 

We are grateful for the many volunteers who help in many ways such as 
delivering Meals on Wheels, making weekly Friendly Visitor calls, 
housekeeping duties at Bemis Hall and assisting with hospitality at 
clinics, programs and social functions. 

All of the above activities have increased the work load of our 
staff. We were pleased that the Selectmen, realizing the work and 
responsibilities of Ruth Kramer, elevated her position to that of 
Director. Ruth and part-time assistant Rhoda Presti have performed with 
exellence their responsibilities for the smooth operation of the programs 
of the Council on Aging. 



65 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION (MHCC) 

Mirie "Jackie" Gavin, Alternate Member 
Ruth Morey, Board Member 

Since 1977, the Town of Lincoln has received from Minuteman Home Care 
Corporation social services for some of its older residents in need of 
support. Through payment of an annual "local share", Lincoln is entitled 
to be represented on the policy-setting Board of Members of MHCC which 
administers the services. During the 1987 fiscal year, the local share 
assessed to the Town of Lincoln was $371.00, a slight increase from 1986. 
The amount is calculated from a formula based on members of the community 
aged 60 years and over, as determined by the 1980 Federal Census. 

During fiscal year July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987, twelve (12) Lincoln 
residents received services under the State Home Care Program portion of 
MHCC's budget, for a total value of $22,378.00. The services include 
client needs assessment, community resource program, homemaker services, 
social day care, personal care, home delivered meals, protective service, 
chore service, medical transportation and companionship program. 

The total value of MHCC contributions and services in Lincoln in 
fiscal year 1987 is $25,747.00; the sum of funds channeled through MHCC 
from State Home Care, Titles III B and III C of the Older Americans Act. 

This year Lincoln has been represented by Member Ruth Morey of South 
Great Road who was appointed to Finance Advocacy and Service committees. 
Marie "Jackie" Gavin, Alternate Member, was appointed to Advocacy and 
Service committees. 



66 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Barbara L. King 

1987 activities are compiled below: 

Reports of Lost Dogs 140 

Dogs Found by Dog Officer 45 

Other Animals Dealt With 50 

Dead/Hit Animals 21 

Number of Dogs in Pound 45 

Dog Bites Reported 5 

Restraining Orders Issued 8 

Quarantine Notices Issued 3 

Complaints Received 62 

Total Phone Calls 535 

Miles Logged 1,165.6 

Our Annual Rabies Clinic was held June 6, 1987. Thirty-five dogs 
were vaccinated. 

Effective July 1, 1987, the kennel fee was raised to $6.00 per day 
from $3.00 per day for dogs impounded. In addition, a release fee was set 
at $5.00 per dog. 

All dog owners must license their dogs annually. Licensing is 
extremely important for your dog's safety. If your dog decides to travel 
and doesn't return, his/her license may be your dog's only passport home. 

I would like to thank our Police/Fire Department for their constant 
helping hand; of course thanks to Dick Carroll and his DPW crew. Also, to 
Jane Barnet for teaching me the tricks-of-the-trade and her patient ear for 
endless questions. Last but not least, a special thanks to Joe Mannarino 
for his maintenance knowledge and willingness to help when things just 
don't work. 



67 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE (NESWC) 

Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 

The NESWC resource recovery plant In North Andover continues to 
provide disposal of all municipal waste of the Town that is delivered to 
the plant. There have been no interruptions in service; all maintenance 
having been carried out according to a schedule that permits continuity of 
delivery by the Contract Communities. 

A large unexpected increase in tipping fee occurred early in the 
year due to legal advice that proved to be contrary to the same firm's 
earlier counsel on which the year's financial projections were based. By 
curbing all costs that are controllable, by realizing a modest increase In 
revenues from the sale of the electricity produced due to a small rise in 
world oil prices on which the energy price is based, and by adjusting the 
method of projecting the guaranteed tonnage deliveries to be more 
accurate, it has been possible to limit the increase so that the NESWC 
tipping fee is substantially less than the going rate for commercially 
operated plants in this area. 

To accommodate the budgeting and appropriations processes of the 
Contract Communities, the tipping fee was set to be level over the course 
of the year by making use of the NESWC Community Stabilization Fund, 
instead of allowing it to vary with the variations in deliveries and costs 
of operation. The lessons learned and procedures developed will continue 
to be used in future years to avoid any large variation in fees. 

In addition, the Executive Committee has been seeking compensation 
for the loss incurred due to errors in administration under the control of 
the Commonwealth. A commitment given by the Governor to provide funds in 
the form of an interest-free loan to NESWC has been actively pursued, but 
the requisite action by the General Court had not been completed by the 
end of the year. The Executive Committee continues to pursue this source 
of relief with vigor, but also has under active legal review the option of 
litigating a more satisfactory conclusion if the promised legal relief is 
not forthcoming from the Commonwealth. 

After the hard-won revisions in the 1986 Solid Waste Bill were lost 
when the bill failed of passage at the end of the session, substantial 
effort has been applied during this year in lobbying for changes in the 
1987 successor bill as it was working its tortuous way through the 
legislature. The lobbying effort was directed to helping the legislators 
make informed decisions by providing them with facts of the recovery 
process that are not generally understood. The purpose was to minimize 
provisions in the bill that would dictate modifications of the structure 
or operations of the NESWC plant, which would impose severe economic 
hardship on the Contract Communities without any resulting benefits. The 
combined and arduous efforts of the member communities and the NESWC staff 
did succeed in having most of the NESWC amendments included in the bill 
that was passed just before this year ended. 

Efforts continue to increase revenues received from the sale of 
NESWC-generated electricity through renegotiation of the contract with the 
New England Power Company (to which the power is delivered). Talks that 
were intitiated only with persistence on the part of NESWC have been very 
difficult, but they finally yielded an agreement to discuss a possible 
approach to a more equitable basis for pricing to Include credit for 
avoided capital capacity as intended in Federal energy conservation 



68 



legislation. These efforts continue despite lack, of enthusiasm on the 
part of the utility, because an increase of one cent per kilowatt-hour in 
the price of the electricity would provide a reduction in the tipping fee 
of $8 to $10 per ton, a substantial benefit to the Contract Communities. 
A favorable outcome may yet be possible, but the negotiations continue to 
be very difficult and there is no firm assurance of success to date. 

Recycling of such household waste as yard wastes, "white goods," 
newspapers and glass may well be mandated by the Commonwealth within the 
next three to five years. A report on the potential for recycling has 
been prepared by NESWC and distributed to all member communities for 
discussion and development. Preliminary estimates indicate that savings 
in cost of solid waste disposal of 20% to 30% can accrue to each 
municipality, if the procedures are well worked out and applied. Much 
remains to be studied and developed for this program to be successful. 
Whatever the outcome, it will have a substantial effect on the design and 
construction of the Town transfer station. 

Reorganization of the North Andover form of town government resulted 
in their need for the space the NESWC office occupied gratis in the Town 
Hall. North Andover very cooperatively allowed NESWC to continue use of 
the space through the end of the fiscal year. At that time the office was 
moved to space rented in a commercial location nearby with no interruption 
in operations and with only a modest increase in cost and some increase in 
efficiency of operation. 

Activities of the plant continues to be monitored closely to insure 
continued smooth operation, to find ways of improving its operation and 
reducing costs, to minimize problems and costs of the landfill for residue 
disposal and emergency bypass, and to insure tight fiscal control through 
careful annual audit by a national accounting consultant firm. 

Reserve funds of substantial magnitude held to the credit of NESWC 
by the Trustee and restricted in use to such purposes as bond reserve and 
debt service, provide a return on investment that is available as current 
income for use in project operations. Any increase that can be realized 
in the investment return would be available for reducing the tipping fee. 
To that end a financial consultant has been retained after competitive 
selection to assist NESWC in gaining more income from this source 
consistent with safety of capital. Preliminary analysis indicates that 
significant increases in income are feasible if methods consonant with 
NESWC contract strictures can be developed as expected. A detailed study 
is currently under way with the initial report due in January 1988. If 
the results warrant, new procedures will be put in place by which the 
gains can be realized and continued for the life of the reserves, tb 
produce a corresponding reduction in the tipping fee. 

The continuing successful operation of the NESWC project not only 
provides a long-term solution to the serious problem of municipal solid 
waste disposal without adverse effects on the environment, it also serves 
as a first and unique model of how municipalities can solve other 
important problems that are beyond their individual capabilities by 
working cooperatively without the disadvantages of inflexible 
regionalizaiton and without resorting to higher levels of civic 
administration. 

Questions and suggestions regarding NESWC are welcome. 



69 



PERMANENT TRANSFER STATION DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Tina Damico 

Eleanor Gallltano 

Harry Hadley 

James Lennon 

Beth Lerman 

Brian Pettigrew 

Elizabeth Corcoran, Chairman 

The Town has moved into the final stages of the conversion from a 
landfill to a permanent transfer station as a means of disposing of the 
Town's solid waste. To assist them in this transition, the Selectmen 
reorganized and recharged the Solid Waste Study Committee, and renamed it 
the Permanent Transfer Station Design Review Committee. Membership was 
expanded to include two representatives from the Mill Street community and 
a third representing Lincoln at-large. The Committee's basic task was to 
assist the Selectmen in the review of design plans, submitted by S.E.A. 
Consultants, for a permanent transfer station to be presented for approval 
at the March 1988 Annual Town Meeting. 

Some background information may be helpful. In 1979, Town Meeting, 
acknowledging that the landfill had a finite life, authorized the 
Selectmen to enter into a contract with a regional resource recovery 
facility. In 1981, the Selectmen signed a contract with NESWC, and the 
Town faced the responsibility of developing a plan for the collection and 
hauling of solid waste. In 1984, the Solid Waste Study Committee was 
appointed to develop such a plan. Annual Town Meeting, 1985, appropriated 
funds to build a temporary transfer station facility at the landfill 
site. The Solid Waste Study Committee researched sites for a permanent 
facility. It's recommendation of the Mill Street location was brought to 
Annual Town Meeting, 1987, along with a request by the Selectmen for 
$50,000 to be used for professional services in design of the permanent 
transfer station. Town Meeting approved only $10,000 for design of a 
permanent station at the Mill Street landfill site. 

The Town's agreement with DEQE stipulates that the landfill will be 
closed and capped and a permanent transfer station will be operational by 
December 31, 1988. Given this deadline, Annual Town Meeting, 1988, must 
approve the design of the permanent transfer station. 

The Permanent Transfer Station Design Review Committee has worked to 
obtain the necessary approvals from the Board of Health and the Board of 
Appeals. The Selectmen have acted on the Committee's recommendation to 
request permission from Minuteman National Park to maintain the current 
access from Route 2A to the site of the transfer station. If this access 
is continued but not paved, DEQE will have to waive that requirement. The 
realignment of Route 2A will eventually determine the permanent location 
of the access road. 

Acknowledging DEQE regulations, the Committee recommended that the 
Permanent Transfer Station should utilize, where possible, the existing 
hardware of the Temporary Transfer Station. Electricity and water are 
seen as necessary site improvements as well as the addition of permanent 
shelter for the operator of the facility. The Committee further 
recommended that voluntary recycling be encouraged through the inclusion 
of recycling bins in the design. The operation of a recycling program is 
seen as not only necessary but also cost effective. Further cost savings 
could be realized if the Town were to do its own hauling to the NEWSC 
plant in North Andover. 



70 



The Temporary Transfer Station has proven to be a successful, clean 
solution to Lincoln's solid waste disposal. The Permanent Transfer 
Station Design Review Committee views the construction of the Permanent 
Transfer Station as a necessary next step in the evolving regional 
approach to solid waste disposal. 

The members of the Permanent Transfer Station Design Review 
Committee would like to thank Dick Carroll, Frank Emmons, Alyson Morse, 
Dave Ramsay, Vicky Diadiuck, the Board of Health and the Board of Appeals 
for their cooperation. Also, to the town employees who have operated and 
maintained the Temporary Transfer Station, sincere thanks. 



71 



Planning an<l I* u hi i<: Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

F. Douglas Adams 

Elizabeth Corcoran 

Palmer Faran 

Warren Flint, Jr. 

William G. Constable, Chairman 

1987 has been a year of major accomplishments for the Planning Board; 
in addition to the traditional planning and subdivision activities of the 
Board. Perhaps the most significant was the implementation of the North 
Lincoln Housing Project, now called Battle Road Farm. Other endeavors 
included the re-establishment of the Long Range Planning Committee, the 
formation of HATS II, design completion for the Route 2 Safety 
Improvements, and organization of responses to the developments in Waltham 
on the Lincoln border. 

Ongoing Matters 

The Planning Board discharged its statutory obligations of 
subdivisions site plan approvals and its traditional activities of 
interpreting the zoning bylaw, advising inquiring residents, and making 
recommendations to the Board of Appeals on variances and special permits. 
The Board also approved a two lot subdivision on Tower Road and a four lot 
subdivision off Sandy Pond Road, called Countryside Drive, along with five 
ANR subdivisions that came before the Board, one of which was the MacMahon 
property on the corner of Lincoln and South Great Roads. Numerous meetings 
were held concerning the developments of Stratford Realty land on 
Huckleberry Hill and the possibility of rezoning the land. 

North Lincoln 

The Planning Board has been working closely with Lincoln House 
Associates (the developers of Battle Road Farm) to refine in detail the 
proposal, requiring considerable effort on the development site plan and 
the methodology to ensure continued affordability of the subsidized units. 
Working with the Housing Commission, the developer and the Executive Office 
of Communities and Development, the Planning Board approved the site plan, 
issued a special permit, and developed continued affordability conditions 
as approved by Town Meeting, would be administered. The Planning Board 
worked with the developer to overcome numerous regulatory hurdles, 
including those of the Massachusetts Historic Commission, DEQE, and DPW. 

Cranberry Hill Associates, developer's of the 120,000 sq. ft. office 
complex, has filed it's Special Permit Application and definitive plans 
this past fall. These plans include the relocation of Old Bedford Road to 
expand arterial road alternatives, and fulfilling the plan approved at the 
Fall 1986 Town Meeting. 

Affordable Housing Initiatives 

In addition to Battle Road Farm, several other affordable housing 
creation activities were pursued by the Board. The first accessory special 
permit utilizing the preferential conditions associated with a Housing 
Commission contract was approved. 



72 



In addition, the Board provided land use guidance to the Housing 
Commission's review of publicly owned possible sites for new affordable 
housing. The Board has also begun working on a revision to the zoning 
bylaw that would include inclusionary housing in new subdivisions. 

Beyond Our Borders 

Developments adjacent to Lincoln jeopardizes the Town's way of life. 
The developments on Lincoln's border in Waltham continue to threaten the 
Town's narrow roads. The Planning Board has worked with the Traffic 
Management Committee and the Winter Street Task Force in their efforts to 
mitigate these problems. Working with Senator Carol Amick and the newly 
reconstituted HATS II Committee, the Hanscom Field Advisory Commission and 
the Metropolitian Area Planning Council, the Board continues to monitor 
development and strive to mitigate impacts. 

Route 2 Safety Improvements 

The Planning Board worked with other Town Boards and Town residents, 
particularly those on Juniper Ridge, and the State to achieve these safety 
improvements. Work is to begin in February 1988 to alleviate the dangers 
inherent on this section of Route 2. 

Subcommittees 

As always, the land use planning efforts of the Planning Board were 
greatly assisted by those serving on one of several committees including 
the following: 

Long Range Planning Committee - this committee was reorganized to 
create a land resource map of the Town so that we can decide how to make 
the best use of the land in the future. Under the leadership of Bob 
Lemire, the LRPC created a series of maps illustrating ownership, 
significant physical features, and probable developability. This resource 
shall provide valuable aid to the planning efforts of numerous Town 
agencies. 

Historic District Commission - in addition to overseeing changes to 
the District, the Commission has been helpful relieving the traffic from 
Winter Street/Old County Road through the center of Town, the Historic 
District. 

HATS II (Hanscom Area Traffic Study Committee) - after reviewing its 
objectives this committee was revitalized with a new charge to deal with 
Massport and other land use in the sub-region. 

Roadside Path Committee - this committee was reformed and given a new 
charge to study possible locations for new roadside paths and the 
feasibility of constructing them. 

Lewis Street Study Committee - this ad hoc committee has completed its 
work and the DPW has returned the street to its original, more attractive 
layout. 

Traffic Management Committee - drawing upon its earlier analysis, this 
committee has worked to relieve traffic congestion coming from Waltham to 
Lincoln, and is preparing a traffic study report of the entire town. 

Land Bank Study Committee - as authorized by the 1987 Annual Town 
Meeting, this ad hoc group worked with the Planning Board to review issues 
associated with a possible real estate transfer tax. 



73 



Acquifer Protection Study Committee - by reviewing geophysical data, 
environmental risks, and regulatory alternatives, this study group 
investigated the merits and means of protecting our acquifers and water 
supplies. 

Other Business 

Culminating a process of several years and meetings, a site for the 
Peace Pole was finally approved and the pole was set up in South Lincoln 
Park. 

The Board has worked closely with the Minuteman National Historic Park 
In its first master planning effort since the creation of this park. One 
of the concerns is the relocation of Route 2A. 

Our Thanks 

After several years on the Planning Board, highlighted by a superhuman 
effort coordinating the Special Town Meeting approval of the North Lincoln 
Planning District, Rosamond Delori decided to retire and Palmer Faran was 
elected to fill out her term. To Roz and to all those who donate their 
time, energes and creativity to the many official and ad hoc subcommittees, 
we offer our thanks. 



74 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Morton B. Braun 
D'Arcy G. MacMahon 
C. Russel Hansen, Jr. 
Jacquelyn H. Snelling 
Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 

Despena F. Billings, Associate Member 
Fred John Solman, III, Associate Member 

There were 33 applications filed, 19 hearings scheduled, 19 renewals 
published during 1987 as follows. 



January 6 - 

January 20 - 
February 9 - 



GILES DILG, LEWIS ST. special permit for 

business GRANTED 

FRED RULAND, TRAPELO RD. special permit 

for apartment GRANTED 

KATHERINE C. IVES, BEDFORD RD. special permit 

for apartment GRANTED 

LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, INC. SOUTH GREAT RD. renewal 

special permit for non-conforming use GRANTED 

3 months 



February 24 - THE BUILDER'S CLUB OF LINCOLN, INC. SOUTH GREAT RD. 
renewal special permit for charitable 

institution GRANTED 

- LIBRARY TRUSTEES, LIBRARY LAND special permit 

for exemption from parking requirements GRANTED 



March 10 - 



March 24 



JUDITH A. WONG & LARRY E. MYERS, CODMAN RD. 

variance from side yard setback 
PATRICIA R. REED, OXBOW RD. special permit 

for apartment 

PAUL BUONOPANE, LINCOLN RD. special permit 

for non-conforming lot 
JOHN F. CONNOLLY, CAMBRIDGE TPKE. variance 

from side yard setback 



April 7 - WILLIAM LYTLE, LAUREL DRIVE variance from 
side yard setback 
MARCIA ROEHR, OLD CONCORD ROAD renewal of 
special permit for apartment 
- ARTHUR KURTZ, OLD CONCORD RD. special permit 
for more than one employee in business 

April 21 - LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, SOUTH GREAT RD. modification 
and renewal of special permit for 
non-conforming use 
- SEJFI PR0T0PAPA, LEWIS ST. special permit 
for medical practice 

May 12 - ROBERT CHMIELINSKI, SOUTH GREAT RD. variance 
from side yard setback. 

May 26 - SEJFI PROTOPAPA, LEWIS ST. special permit 
for medical practice 



GRANTED 
GRANTED 

GRANTED 
DENIED 

WITHDRAWN 

GRANTED 

DENIED 

CONTINUED 

WITHDRAWN 

GRANTED 

GRANTED 



75 



June 16 - GILES DILC, LEWIS ST. special permit for 

business GRANTED 

DONALD SECKLER, LEXINGTON RD. variance from 

front yard setback DENIED 

June 30 - WILLIAM HAMILTON 4 BARBARA SAMPSON, SOUTH 
GREAT RD. special permit to retain side 
yard setback GRANTED 

September 15- JOSEPH AZRACK, BEDFORD RD. renewal of special 

permit for apartment WITHDRAWN 

ROBERT DENORMANDIE, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for travel agency GRANTED 

September 29- DAVID & ELIZABETH VAN BUSKIRK, PAGE FARM RD. 

variance from front yard setback DENIED 

PHILIP MOSS, WESTON RD. variance from width 

of lot through residence GRANTED 

October 13 - RANDAL BRIGGS, FARRAR RD. special permit 

for apartment GRANTED 

JONATHAN COHEN & ELEANOR FRIEDMAN, BAKER 

BRIDGE RD. special permit for apartment GRANTED 

PHILIP DENORMANDIE, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for chiropractic office GRANTED 

October 27 - RICHARD S. LEE, SOUTH GREAT RD. variance 

from rear yard setback GRANTED 

WARBLER SPRINGS, TOWER RD. variance from 

side yard setback GRANTED 

October 29 - TOWN OF LINCOLN, NORTH GREAT RD. special 

permit for landfill and transfer station GRANTED 

November 10 - GORDON WINCHELL & CHARLES KEEVIL, CONCORD RD. 
modification of special permit for doctor's 
office GRANTED 

December 1 - SEJFI PR0T0PAPA, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for medical practice GRANTED 

- PHILIP DENORMANDIE, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for architectural office GRANTED 

RENEWALS: Warren Arnold, Blueberry Ln. - Apartment 

Paula Bennett, Beaver Pond Rd. - Apartment 

John W. Braasch, Sandy Pond Rd. - Apartment 

Walter J. Burke, Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 

Rebecca Chase, Trapelo Rd. - Apartment 

Contance Diab, Deer Run Rd. - Apartment 

Giles Dilg, Lewis St. - Real estate office 

Rudolph Diluzio & Ruth Potter, Tower Rd. - Apartment 

William Doherty, Lincoln Rd. - Restaurant 

Neil Feinberg, Concord Rd. - Apartment 

Ann Gannett, Old Concord Rd. - Apartment 

Lewis Grinnen, Woods End Rd. - Apartment 

Benjamin Hyde, Tower Road - Apartment 

Lincoln Housing Commission Codman Rd. - Apartment 

Natalie Miller, Old County Rd. - Apartment 

Lucy Myers, Concord Rd. - Apartment 

James Nicholson, Meadowdam Rd. - Apartment 

Wilfried Schmid, Silver Hill Rd. - Apartment 

Bella Wheeler, Old Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 



76 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Becky Bartovics 
Liz Downey 
Bob Jenal 
Katharine Preston 
Rich Theriault 
Larry Thompson 
Bob Lemire, Chairman 

We continued to meet regularly on the first and third Wednesdays of 
each month. Most of our meeting time was spent reviewing progress on seven 
information gathering and display tasks being prepared for our first 
comprehensive report to the Town. 

As 1987 drew to a close, we neared completion of five tasks which can 
be described briefly as follows: 

1. Preparation of a map scaled as 1" to 500' showing each parcel of land 
in Lincoln subject to development change; 

2. Analysis of the overall development change potential with presentations 
by use and orders of magnitude; 

3. Overlay presentation of aquifers and watersheds; 

4. Overlay presentation of remaining land of conservation interest; 

5. Baseline study with graphic presentation of the Town's commercial 
area. This study shows area use, assessed valuations, and tax yields. 

Two other study tasks are well started. These are: 

1. Preparation of an airport noise analysis and display; 

2. Preparation of a long range fiscal model projecting to the year 2004. 

With the first five products available in good draft form, we plan to 
meet with the Town's Housing Committee to identify candidate sites for 
special housing. 

After two years of planning task preparation, this committee sees 1988 
as a year of transition, a year when these analyses are made available to 
interested town boards through the Planning Board with the full involvement 
of the Selectmen. 

This process should produce a clear sense of where change is likely to 
take place, conventional development possibilities, public protection and 
development interests, available resources for community involvement, and a 
carefully conceived sense of publicly preferred uses for special parcels. 
It is hoped that this will enable the Selectmen to orchestrate a carefully 
conceived approach to individual land owners with offers to help them 
realize the dollar values of their property in ways compatible with Town 
protection and development interests. 

We have come a long way in two years. Our progress could not have 
been achieved without the generous and willing cooperation of the Planning 
Board, Conservation Commission, Board of Assessors, Housing Commission, 
Finance Committee, and numerous others. It should be no surprise that much 
of our work rests on the many hours and days contributed by Warren Flint 
whose intimate knowledge of the Town remains a vital resource. 



77 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Kenneth Bassett 

Thomas Billings 

Claire Cunningham 

Robert Mack 

Nathalie Rice 

William Rizzo, Jr. 

J. Quincy Adams, Chairman 



PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Open Space Activities ; The Conservation Commission's work to retain 
Lincoln's rural character has become increasingly difficult as real estate 
values continue to climb. Work has continued on the update of the Town's 
Open Space Plan, which will provide the Commission and residents with a 
clear overview of future conservation efforts. 

The Commission gratefully accepted a conservation restriction and 
trail easement from Mr. Kenneth Eisner, as part of a small cluster 
development on Sandy Pond Road. This trail will connect the Goose Pond 
neighborhood with the Flint's Pond conservation land, since a trail is 
also planned through the Forest Lake subdivision. With the guidance of 
member Robert Mack, the Commission approved standard trail easement and 
permanent conservation restriction forms for the use of landowners 
interested in pursuing such avenues. In the latter part of the year, the 
Commission discussed the proposed development of the Adler property off 
Trapelo Road, including the preservation of open space and trail 
connections. 

Wetlands : In 1987, eleven public hearings were held under the Wetlands 
Protection Act. The permitting process for the Battle Road Farm project 
was especially complex, due to the plans for surface sewage disposal. The 
Commission is satisfied that the design and proposed management of the 
plant will not degrade the site's wetland. Other activities included 
preliminary review of Phase 2 of the Route 2 safety upgrades, 
participation in the development of capping plans for the former Hanscom 
landfill off Virginia Road and work with the Water Commissioners regarding 
redevlepment of the Farrar Pond Well. The Commission is also developing a 
local wetlands by-law for submission to Spring Town Meeting. This by-law 
will complement the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, and allow the 
Commission to better protect Lincoln's wetland resources. 

Staffing ; The Commission regretfully accepted the resignations of the two 
Conservation Technicians, Bob Benson and Rick Lachappelle. Scott Mooney, 
a former DPW employee and experienced arborist, has filled one of the 
openings. Michael Murphy continues to perform the duties of Conservation 
Land Manager with a high degree of skill and sensitivity. The 
Commission's administrative work is handled with professionalism and 
enthusiasm by Conservation Administrator/Ranger Tara Tracy. After two 
years of hard work, Chief Ranger Barbara Walther moved to Ithaca, NY in 
September. Rich Marcou, a biology major at Framingham State College and 
avid outdoorsman, has been hired in her place. 



78 



CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Ranger Program : The Conservation Rangers continue to provide a uniformed 
presence on conservation land in a professional manner. Steve Hochberg 
ably assisted the Ranger program this summer. The Rangers' enforcement 
duties include the removal of swimmers and fishers at Flint's Pond and 
parking control during ski season. The Rangers have recently started to 
monitor mountain bike use on conservation land, educating bikers as to 
appropriate trails and safety measures. Interpretative programs were held 
in the spring and summer of this year, mainly guided walks to acquaint 
residents with the history and ecology of various conservation lands. In 
1987, user visits totalled 37,221, down slightly (2%) from 1986. 

Farmland Program ; Rental fees from Town-owned agricultural lands totalled 
$3,825, an increase of $800 from 1986. The increase is due to expanded 
use at the Codman property behind the police station (pasture) and at the 
Ricci property (cropland). In 1987, the Agricultural Pesticide 
Subcommittee completed their work. The Commission accepted their 
recommendations in full, resulting in improved signage, the establishment 
of a buffer in the Mt. Misery field and the elimination of several 
pesticides. With the implementation of these measures, commercial 
agriculture and recreational use of conservation land become even more 
compatible. 

Trails ; On the Flint's Pond east parcel, a 15-acre leaf fire occurred in 
April. Due to the wet condition of the trails at the time, substantial 
damage was created by fire trucks entering the parcel. Trail rebuilding 
and erosion control measures took place in the following months. 

A trail system was planned for the Battle Road Farm project, 
connecting the conservation buffer with National Park property and the 
building site. On the Adams Woods parcel, water bars and protective trail 
barriers were installed. Trail were mowed during the spring months to 
eliminate tall grass and poison ivy for foot races and general use. 

Fields : Work continued on the Ricci Farm parcel. Brush and trash were 
removed from drainage ditches and field edges, and a windbreak of 
evergreens was planted on the north side of the field. 

The fields surrounding Flint's Pond were mowed to create well-defined 
areas by removing encroaching trees and brush. Pesticide warning signs 
were constructed and installed on agricultural lands as needed. Continued 
field mowing took place throughout Town on Commission properties, Land 
Trust parcels and the school fields. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care : Hardy flowering crabapples were planted at 
the edge of Trapelo Road. These columnar trees will provide year-round 
ornamental value. The Town Offices planting was completed with the 
addition of two large dogwoods at the entryway. The three-corner cemetary 
received replacement plantings of a hornbeam and several arborvitae. On 
Tower Road, near Stonehedge, a large roadside red oak was correctively 
pruned and interfering saplings removed. 

At the library continued care of the catalpa took place involving deep 
root feeding and watering. Preparation for construction of the library 
addition involved pruning and feeding of shade trees around the building. 
Trees of important specimen and ornamental value were watered during the 
summer to relieve stress. The European white birch at the Pierce House 
was cabled to prevent storm damage. 



79 



The departure of registered arborist Richard Lachapelle after eight 
years signifies a loss to the Town's arborcultural programs. Rick was 
very knowledgeable and helped to select numerous tree species for 
plantings. He also helped to preserve our elm trees and to combat 
ornamental and shade tree pest problems. 

Other Projects : A wildlife clearing was cut in the center of the Flint's 
Pond east parcel. This removal of medium-sized trees will allow enough 
sunlight to reach the forest floor, promoting the growth of vegetation for 
wildlife forage and cover. During the fall of this year there was 
evidence of deer browsing on stump sprouts in this area. 

At the canoe landing an osprey nesting pole was erected in cooperation 
with the Sudbury Valley Trustees and the Boston Edison Company. The 
location of the nest near the river provides a promising site for the 
threatened "fish hawk" to raise its young. 

Evergreen seedlings provided by the County Extension Service were 
planted throught Town. Red pines planted by Sumner Smith near Flint's 
Pond were thinned to allow for proper growth. 

Miscellaneous projects include snow removal, mechanical maintenance, 
sign repair, Land Trust cooperation and management of the Baker Bridge 
brush dump. 



80 



TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Johnathan Hubbard 

Mike Kassner 

Lois Love 

David O'Neill 

Robert Schudy 

Carol White 

Terry Fenton, Chairman 

The Traffic Management Committee was created by the Selectmen and the 
Planning Board in response to the Town's increasing problem with commuter 
traffic. The charge to the committee is to find ways to preserve the rural, 
residential nature of the Town by directing through traffic away from local 
roads and placing it on state highways designed to handle it. 

Lincoln is located between a rapidly developing industrial area along 
the Route 128 corridor to its east and an extensive build-up of housing to its 
west. As a result, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of the 
Town's local residential streets by through traffic, commuting to the 
commercial areas along its eastern border. This has led to increased noise, 
pollution, safety problems, and traffic congestion. Increased traffic due to 
further development in the commercial area immediately east of Lincoln is 
projected to result in complete saturation of the Town's internal road system, 
with long delays at key locations, such as the historic 5-corner intersection, 
and dramatic decrements in safety conditions and the quality of life. 

Attempts to change commuting patterns so as to minimize the amount of 
through traffic on local roads involve issues such as road closings, turning 
restrictions, speed regulation and road construction, many of which are 
regulated by either State agencies or the County Commissioners. Thus, road 
alterations favorable to the Town's goals often require approval at either the 
State or the County level. However, recent changes in State regulations give 
control of relatively minor traffic regulations, including turning 
restrictions, to local municipalities. The Committee believes that these 
changes give the Town the opportunity to experiment with a limited number of 
turning restrictions designed to direct traffic away from its internal roads. 

During the past year the Traffic Management Committee completed the 
first draft of a Traffic Management Plan. This document examines the traffic 
volumes and capacities of the numbered highways that pass through Lincoln, 
analysing problem intersections and discussing potential solutions. It also 
studies the local roads most severly endangered by commuter traffic, focusing 
upon key intersections at which traffic could be directed towards the numbered 
highway system by means of turning restrictions. The Committee's 
recommendations are designed to promote dialog and experimentation, rather 
than to set policy. Towards that end, they include suggestions for 
implementing certain turning restrictions on a trial basis and performing a 
careful study of the resulting costs and benefits. 



81 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Robert C. Brannen 

William C. Constable 

Margaret P. Flint 

William A. King, Secretary 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Samuel C. Mygatt 

Paul Svetz, Treasurer 

William M. Preston, Chairman 

The 10.2 acre parcel on the slopes of Peirce (or Shaw) Hill in the 
center of town, which was bought in 1986 by the Rural Land Foundation, has 
been turned over to the Land Trust. Added to our previously owned 
abutting 5.0 acres, this protects permanently a splendid forested area and 
the existing trail around it. 

Despite all our efforts, we were unable to recruit the usual trail 
crew last summer. It appeared that vigourous outdoor work was less 
attractive, In the contemporary high-employment situation, than 
lower-paying but physically less demanding jobs. The previous winter had 
not been a bad one, In terms of blown-down trees, so with the help of 
volunteers, most of our trails were rendered passable by early summer. 
However, we enter 1988 with a large backlog of needed work on our 
properties which we will have to try to make up in the coming summer. 



82 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Balance 12/31/86 

Harvard Trust 

Fidelity Daily Income Trust 

Fidelity Cash Reserves 

Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 

Securities 



2,802.19 

8,217.70 

14,812.33 

10,178.90 

1,120.00 







37,131.12 


Received 

Contributions 


5,945.00 




Sales of trail maps 


751.00 




Rent (Fields) 


200.00 




Dividends 


46.76 




Interest: Harvard Trust 


211.57 




Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


508.26 




Fidelity Cash Reserves 


949.94 




Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 


652.78 


9,265.31 


Expenses 






Wages and supplies 


381.78 




Equipment and repairs 


976.90 




Insurance 


209.72 




Printing 


3,530.00 




Postage 


202.34 




Legal, filing fees, misc. 


222.89 




Mowing and tree removal 


212.50 


5,736.13 


Balance 12/31/87 






Harvard Trust 


4,256.39 




Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


8,689.96 




Fidelity Cash Reserves 


15,762.27 




Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 


10,831.68 




Securities 


1,120.00 





40,660.30 



83 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Giles Browne 

Raymond Johnson 

Henry Morgan (appointed) 

Elizabeth Snelling (resigned) 

Lorian Brown, Chairman 

Mary Helen Lorenz, Vice Chairman 

In June, Elizabeth Snelling resigned from the Housing Commission 
after eight years of devoted service. She had been a member of the 
original Housing Committee, and had served on the Housing Commission from 
its inception. Her broad knowledge, her perseverance and plain hard work 
as Chairman, and her unfailing sensitivity and concern, are especially 
missed. We are fortunate that she continues to provide support and 
assistance whenever called upon by her less experienced colleagues. Henry 
Morgan now serves as the Selectmen's Appointee in her place. His 
management expertise, and his experience as a Selectman, are invaluable 
assets. 

1987 has been both an exciting and a difficult year for the Housing 
Commission: exciting because of the Town's approval in the fall of 1986 of 
the affordable housing development to be built by Lincoln House Associates 
in North Lincoln; difficult because of the recent increase in the number 
and complexity of housing issues before the Town. In addition to operating 
the Town's present housing programs, the Housing Commission has devoted 
substantial amounts of time to the following new projects: 

Ensuring that 6 Battle Road Farm units will be rented to low and 
moderate income families by Lincoln House Associates for 15 years at no 
cost to the Town. 

Ensuring that the Town has the option to purchase thos rental units 
at a fair price at the end of the period. 

Working with Cranberry Hill Associates, EOCD officials, and Town 
boards to move the North Lincoln houses offered to the Town by Larry 
Smith. (January to March 1987.) 

Working with the Town's Executive Secretary to facilitate the 
renovation of the Sunnyside Lane house. Richard Puffer has provided 
valuable assistance here in preparing specifications for bids. (Ongoing.) 

Developing, with the help of the North Lincoln Marketing Committee, 
eligibility and affordability policies for the 72 Homeownerhship Program 
units at Battle Road Farm. (January to May 1987.) 

Working with the Selectmen, the Planning Board, Lincoln House 
Associates and Massachusetts Housing Partnership officials at EOCD to 
further develop and refine those policies to meet Lincoln's needs. (From 
May on.) 

Developing Lincoln's proposal for a local nonprofit entity to manage 
resales and preserve affordability for the 72 HOP units. (June to 
September 1987.) 

Working with the Lincoln Foundation, with the Selectmen and the 
Planning Board, and with Lincoln House Associates and Massachusetts Housing 
Partnership officials to enable the Lincoln Foundation to act as the Town's 
agent in managing the Battle Road Farm resales. (From June on.) 



8A 



Responding to voters' concerns regarding affordability and design 
issues, and the need or not for another Special Town Meeting, this one "to 
examine details" relating to the granting of the Special Permit by the 
Planning Board. (June to August 1987.) 

Participating in design workshops and reviewing design submissions 
from Lincoln House Associates for the Special Permit. Dick Reece ably 
assisted the Housing Commission by serving as our "in-house expert" here. 
(January to September 1987.) 

Responding to requests from Lincoln residents, interested 
applicants, other towns, development consultants, organizations and 
journalists all wanting information about Lincoln's affordable housing 
achievement . (Ongoing . ) 

Obtaining a $5,000 state grant to study the five Town-owned sites 
identified by the Long Range Planning Committee as potentially suitable for 
housing use, then selecting a planning consultant and working closely with 
him to complete this initial feasibility study. (From January on.) 

Working with Town boards and community organizations to identify 
present and future housing needs. (From September on.) 

Working with Town boards to develop and recommend a five-year 
housing plan for Lincoln. (From October on.) 

Working with the Long Range Planning Committee and the Planning 
Board to develop an inventory of privately owned land suitable for housing 
use. (From May on.) 

Meeting with private developers to discuss the provision of 
affordable housing units within their proposed developments. (Three active 
proposals from June to December 1987.) 

Working closely with the Selectmen, the Executive Secretary and the 
Finance Committee to obtain needed clerical, administrative, and management 
support for the Housing Commission. 

It goes without saying that all these projects, as well as the 
Town's existing housing operations (Codman Farmhouse Shared Living and 
three family rental units) could not have gone forward as they have without 
the contributions of many individuals and groups. In particular, we would 
like to acknowledge the sustained efforts of the North Lincoln Marketing 
Committee, the Planning Board, the Selectmen, the Lincoln Foundation, the 
Codman Farmhouse Selection Committee and the cheerful assistance of 
everyone at the Town Offices, especially the work done by Dave Ramsay, 
Betty Lang, Alyson Morse, and Barbara King. 



85 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 
Robert L. DeNormandie 
Gabriel Farrell, Chairman 

During 1987 the Water Commissioners, the Executive Secretary, the 
Town Engineer, the Director of the DPW and the Water Department have made a 
concerted effort to complete a variety of projects as well as to lay the 
groundwork for future development and improvement of the water distribution 
system. We have instituted a weekly meeting to discuss ongoing operations 
and issues which need to be resolved. The fact all interested parties are 
regularly in the same room has significantly improved communication and 
made it easiesr to keep projects moving along efficiently. Projects which 
have been undertaken during the past year include: 

Farrar Pond Well 

After lengthy test pumping to establish a safe yield and various 
analyses to ensure the well water was within safe water guidelines, we 
prepared bid specifications for the cleaning and surging of the well and a 
contract was awarded. The work, which will include the replacement of the 
current pump with a smaller model, will be accomplished during the Spring 
of 1988. The well was placed back into service during the summer and 
performed successfully. Chemical testing indicated no problems. We feel 
that with close supervision and pumping at lower rates than initially 
planned, the well can continue to be a productive part of our system. 

Flint's Pond Pumping Station 

There has been a great deal of activity on this site throughout the 
year. Inside, the number two pump has been replaced. Currently the final 
testing is being completed and we expect the new pump to be on line in the 
near future. The replacement process has brought to our attention a number 
of system improvements which we hope to accomplish during the coming 
months. Outside, the rear shed roof has been replaced and a small room has 
been added to the station to house the gas chlorination equipment which 
will be installed in the Spring. The construction work was completed with 
the help of the Minuteman VoTech Carpentry class. 

Tower Road Well 

After experimenting with Potassium Hydroxide for the control of pH, 
the Commissioners decided to eliminate the existing limefeed system. The 
new system, which is a bit more costly, will be in operation in January, 
1988. The additional cost of chemicals is expected to be partially offset 
by less repair time. The ability to maintain a consistent chemical feed 
will also permit us to maintain a steady pH level when using this well 
facility. 

Well Site Assessment 

The review of possible well sites by our consulting engineer, who was 
ably assisted by Leona Champeny, continued throughout the Summer and Fall 
of 1987. Approximately forty test wells were drilled. The preliminary 
results indicate two sites where the quality and quantity of water appear 
very hopeful. Each of these sites is located on existing conservation 
land: near the Concord River and north of the Codman House. The final 
report will be issued this Spring. We will be asking the Town to approve 
an additional amount ($75,000) to fund the extended pumping tests currently 
required by the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering (DEQE). 



86 



These tests are extremely detailed and the above sum will cover one site. 
In view of the long lead time required to pass all of the requirements, to 
say nothing of the construction of the well itself, we feel it is prudent 
to continue to advance this project. 

Other Projects 

In conjunction with the Town Offices upgrade of their computer 
system, we have acquired a new water billing package. This was used for 
the Fall billing in 1987. The system will make It easier to gather and 
analyze water usage as well as rate requirements. 

A draft of regulations for the Water Department has been presented. 
We will be trying to complete it during 1988. 

Due to various problems encountered with the business concern we 
expected to work with on the telemetry project, we decided to place our 
plans on the "back burner" for the time being. 

In conjunction with the Selectmen we are supporting the work of the 
Aquifer Protection Committee. Their analysis of current and future risks 
to our water supply will be very useful and timely. 

During the Fall a monumental effort was undertaken by everyone at the 
Town Offices and in the Water Department to complete the Water Management 
Act Registration for the State. This document addresses the amount of 
water the Town currently takes out of the ground. In the future, we will 
be required to obtain a permit to pump additional water. The bureaucratic 
requirements and regulations keep getting more complex and difficult to 
keep up with. 

The regular flushing and maintenance program continued. However, due 
to several periods when water supply was limited due to pumping and/or 
chemical feed problems, the process was somewhat delayed. During the year 
29 hydrants were repaired and 2 were replaced. 

The water main at Farrar Pond Village was looped together with the 
main on Farrar Road. This will enhance the flow of water in the area as 
well as improve fire protection. 

Much time was spent discussing the appropriate size of water mains to 
be required for "mini" subdivisions. Our concern is that homes which are 
not within 500 feet of an existing hydrant do not have adequate fire 
protection. Furthermore, for the longer distances being encountered the 
traditional 3/4 inch water service is often inappropriate. 

As we look forward to 1988, the Commissioners have asked their 
consulting engineer to assist in developing a five and ten year plan. The 
objective is to assess the current status of our system and to analyze the 
needs and requirements as we look down the road. We must be aware of our 
own local capabilities as well as the regional situation. The growing 
requirements being placed upon us by regulatory agencies will also be taken 
into account. The final report will provide us with the information needed 
to set priorities and develop plans for capital improvements as well as a 
more rational maintenance program for the existing distribution system. 



87 



Statistics as of December 31, 1987 





Beginning 
of year 




Additions 


End of Year 


Miles of water main 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs 
Services in use 


49.87 
414 
544 

50 
1,538 






1. 
10 
25 



6 


21 


51.08 
424 
569 

50 
1544 


Spring Billing 


1986 
66.0 Millions 


of 


gallons 




$148,000 




Fall Billing 


78.6 Millions 


of 


gallons 




222,313 




Spring Billing 


1987 
59.7 Millions 


of 


gallons 




173,203 




Fall Billing 


91.3 Millions 


of 


gallons 




256,850 





88 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Director 

The department has had a year of many accomplishments. All snow 
removal and routine maintenance was accomplished in a timely and 
professional manner. The major projects are as follows: 

1. Type I Bituminous Concrete Overlays: 

a) Lincoln Road from Codman Road to Tower Road intersection. 

b) Page Road from Route 2 to Davison Drive. 

c) 1000 feet of Lewis Street. 

2. Stone Seals: 

a) Weston Road, Conant Road to the Weston Town line. 

b) Silver Hill Road full length. 

c) Conant Road full length. 

3. Road Reconstruction: 

a) Lewis Street from Lincoln Road to the Public Works 1000 
feet. 

b) Lincoln Road, South Great Road to Codman Road 1500 feet. 

A. Work was continued on the reconstruction of the retaining wall 
on Bedford Road. We anticipate completion this spring. 

5. Reconstruction of a drainage line on Bedford Road at the 
intersection of Route 2A. 

6. Construction of a walk at the Smith School Gym to be used at the 
library entrance. 

7. Installation of a drywell drainage system on Tower Road near 
Stonehedge. 

8. The sealing of surface cracks on Concord Road, Trapelo Road, 
South Great Road and Codman Road. 

9. Removal of large stones from the road sub-base on Morningside 
Lane, Bedford Lane and Stonehedge. 

10. Installation of the Peace Pole at the Mini Park. 

11. Assisting other departments with projects such as: 

a) Installation of electrical conduits for lighting 
at the Pierce House. 

b) Excavation for the foundation of a chemical feed 
addition at Sandy Pond. 

c) Installation of a fuel tank and other 
miscellaneous work to facilitate the construction 
of the Codman Pool Bathhouse. 

d) Sub-drains for the housing on Sunnyside Lane. 



89 



12. In addition we have found it necessary to truck all asphalt 
removed from various projects to the Trimount Facility in 
Ashland for disposal and surplus dirt and stones to other out of 
town locations. 

13. Two other areas where an increase in time and effort was 
required are: 

a) Grading and maintenance of the road at the Transfer Station. 

b) Picking up of materials disposed on the roadside such as 
building materials, automobile parts and furniture. 

As always the accomplishments of the department can only be achieved 
by the efforts of the employees and the assistance and cooperation of 
others. My thanks to all. 



90 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Pat Asaff 

Nelson Chu 

Edward Ferri 

Margot Green 

Judith C. F. Gross 

William Shea, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

The Pierce House continued in 1987 to host various and assorted 
functions. Of the seventy-six events held there, nineteen were for 
Lincoln town groups, Girl Scouts, Minutemen, P.T.A., etc. Because of the 
Public Library renovations the house was and continues to be used for the 
Wednesday Morning Lectures and the Jazz Evenings. The Pierce House may be 
booked free of charge by town committees. 

Lincoln residents may rent the house for a nominal fee for private 
functions. There were fourteen such occasions in 1987. We remind 
residents that they may reserve the house a year in advance and we advise 
them to make early reservations because of the heavy demand for function 
facilities. 

This year there were thirty-three non-resident events. These were 
largely wedding receptions but there were some commercial bookings, i.e. a 
scene in an episode of Spencer for Hire and photography for the Creative 
Playthings catalog. 

Non-residents are especially enthusiastic and appreciative of the 
house and grounds. We are glad that we can share this special Lincoln 
landmark with people from other towns. On a practical note, we must add 
that non-residents pay a substantially larger rental fee than do the 
residents. Since the house is supported by these revenues as well as 
income from the Pierce Fund, we welcome these events. 

No major renovations were undertaken this year - wires have been 
installed to. light the rear parking lot which is to be enlarged. Plans 
are being drawn to create a handicap access to be built next spring. 

It was with great regret that the Committee accepted the resignation 
of Lynn Donaldson. Her energy, thought fulness and humor have been an 
important asset to the Committee since its establishment in July 1978. 
She has served in every capacity and we will miss her judgment and 
sensitivity to the house and the town. We wish her all the best as she 
rejoins the "working world" and are glad that she can keep a watchful eye 
on us and the house from her vantage point across the street. The 
Selectmen have appointed Mr. Nelson Chu to take her place. 

We thank Dawn and Mike Murphy who with their children, Melissa and 
Brian, have completed another year of care of the house. We especially 
want to say how much we appreciate Mike's lighting of the outside 
Christmas tree. We hope this will be a Lincoln tradition in the years to 
come. 



91 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Marjorie L. Holland 

H. Arnold MacLean 

James DeNormandle, Chairman (deceased) 

Agents: Warren F. Flint 
Nancy J. Zuelke 

On December 23rd the Cemetery Board suffered a great loss, the 
passing of our Chairman, James DeNormandle. Jim was a Cemetery 
Commissioner for 30 years, and he had served as Chairman since 1969. His 
leadership and genuine interest in the Town of Lincoln's three cemeteries 
will be sorely missed. 

This past year, work on the cemeteries has been largely confined to 
regular maintenance. We are pleased with the continuing good care of our 
grounds by Anthony Vanaria and his crew. 

Looking forward to the coming year, we expect to do some needed tree 
work, especially in the Arbor Vitae Cemetery. The fence along the front 
of the Arbor Vitae Cemetery will also need attention. 

During the year 14 lots, were sold and there were 26 interments. 



92 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John R. Benson 

Elizabeth C. Donald 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

It is anticipated that the Massachusetts Historical Commission will 
complete processing of our nomination of the Woods End Historic District 
for inclusion in the National Registry during 1988. 

The Massachusetts Historical Commission provided strong support for 
Lincoln in its effort to divert from the Center Historic District the large 
increase in traffic from the Bay Colony office park development on Winter 
Street in Waltham. Susan Fargo and John Carman met with the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission and a representative of Bay Colony to review 
developments since the buildings opened. The agreed upon traffic controls 
were discussed and the importance of compliance was emphasized. 

Boston Properties, a real estate developer, has requested approval of 
the Middlesex County Commissioners to widen Old County Road to 60 feet. 
Boston Properties contends that the widening is needed to serve the major 
office park development planned on City of Waltham land which fronts on Old 
County Road. This road is at best a narrow country road with the middle 
portion consisting of only two wheel tracks (almost impassable). We have 
requested the Massachusetts Historical Commission's support of Lincoln's 
effort to protect the Lincoln Center Historic District fron significant new 
traffic pressures. Our objective is to preserve Old County Road, which 
dates from 1766, in substantially its present state, and divert traffic 
from commercial development in Waltham, away from Old County Road toward 
Winter Street and the Totten Pond Road area of Waltham. 

The Commission commends John C. MacLean and the Lincoln Historical 
Society on the publication of the history of Lincoln from the early 1700' s 
to the mid 1900' s. This book with many maps and pictures is entitled A 
Rich Harvest - The History, Buildings, and People of Lincoln Massachusetts . 



93 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

F. Douglas Adams 

John R. Benson 

Elizabeth D. Corcoran 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Kenneth E. Hurd , Alternate 
Kim Kassner, Alternate 

During the past year, hearings were held on applications for 
Certificates of Appropriateness covering additions or modifications to five 
structures in the Historic Districts. They are as follows: 



1. Giles C. Browne 
11 Trapelo Road 
Alteration to House 
Two car garage 



Approved 
Approved 



2. Paul E. Marsh 
61 Bedford Road 
Alteration of entrance 



Approved 



Eugene B. Meyer 
31 Trapelo Road 
Change door to window 



Approved 



4. Jonathan Donaldson 
7 Old Lexington Road 
Alterations to house 



Approved 



Lincoln Library 
Bedford Road 
Addition 



Conditional Approval 



In particular there have been a series of hearings as design 
progressed on the addition to the Lincoln Public Library. At this point 
the Commission has agreed to the issuance of a Certificate of 
Appropriateness conditioned on a review and agreement on pattern, color and 
texture of the brick work and on the detail of wood panels that are 
incorporated in the exterior design. 



94 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Elizabeth Donaldson 

James Henderson 

David M. Hill 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Roy M. Raja, Treasurer 

Clifton Rice, Vice President 

Michael Stratton, Deceased 

Paul Svetz 

Enid Winchell 

Carol Wolfe 

Suze Craig, President 

Stanley D. White, Farmer/Manager 

1987 was a diverse year for Codman Community Farms. Minor breeds 
loomed larger, and because of the weather, the traditional main crop of 
hay loomed smaller. 

We began to get recognition of our work with rare varieties of farm 
animals from beyond Lincoln borders. CCF's use of minor breeds in a 
viable farming operation appeared in publications ranging from the 
"Science Technology" section of the Boston Globe to the New England Farm 
Weekly . 

And indeed, our minor breeds have begun to pay their way. Because 
of maturation and aquisition, CCF was able to start selling a variety of 
new Lincoln-grown products. Veal, hamburger, and sausage are presently 
available on a regular basis from our freezers, in addition to 
Lincoln-grown lamb, pork, and beef. 

Significant additions to our program include two Tamworth pigs from 
Michigan, the first fresh breeding stock of this rare variety to come to 
New England in many years. Lack of new stock had caused serious 
inbreeding problems; the young red-gold animals will be a great help to 
the CCF pork program. Additionally, farmers in the New England area using 
Tamworths will benefit. 

Holding true to its reputation, New England weather was full of 
surprises. Following 1986* s record yield of hay, 1987 gave us one of the 
leanest years in recent memory. All July was dry; we received only 50% of 
our normal rainfall during the entire growing season. But because we 
could harvest and care for silage, brought in after the traditional haying 
season, we can continue to feed CCF stock Lincoln grass. 

Despite adverse weather, the farm has continued to grow and has kept 
many acres of local land productive. Through our projects and programs, 
we continue to provide visible and practical proof of Lincoln's 
agricultural heritage. 



95 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances 

Years ended November 30, 1987 and 1986 

_1987 1986 

Operating revenues: 
Sales: 
Hay 

Vegetable crops 
Livestock 
Custom work 

Purchased items resold 
Total Sales 

Dues 

Garden Plot fees 

Fair 

U.S.D.A. cost sharing 

Interest 

Other 

Total operating revenues 



Operating expenses: 

Labor and related costs 

Seed and livestock 

Fertilizer and lime 

Repairs 

Depreciation 

Feed 

Fair 

Rentals 

Supplies 

Water 

Fuel 

Insurance, taxes and fees 

Freight and utilities 

Legal and accounting 

Office supplies and expense 

Total operating expenses 

Operating income (loss) (6,474) (7,705) 

Non-operating revenue (expenses): 

Unrestricted gift 16,000 11,000 

Endowments 4,556 

Gain (loss) on disposition of equipment 163 2,012 

Total non-operating revenues 20,719 13,012 

Excess revenues (expenses) 14,245 5,307 

Fund Balances at beginning of year 65,372 60,065 



5 26,144 


i 26,015 


3,085 


2,127 


24,534 


6,648 


7,361 


5,460 


1,310 


1,374 


62,435 


41,624 


3,935 


3,626 


865 


830 


7,454 


6,984 


1,496 


- 


1,343 


988 


685 


368 


78,213 


54,420 


42,463 


23,463 


4,704 


5,027 


8,158 


6,100 


5,043 


6,110 


7,335 


6,399 


4,484 


3,568 


3,212 


2,258 


1,743 


1,448 


548 


572 


843 


599 


1,619 


1,704 


1,331 


1,093 


592 


384 


867 


868 


1,746 


2,532 


84,687 


62,125 



Fund Balances at end of year $ 79,617 i 65,372 



96 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Balance Sheet 
November 30, 1987 and 1986 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Inventory 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost: 
Structures 

Motor vehciles and wagons 
Farm implements 
Livestock 

Less accumulated depreciation 

Net property and equipment 

Other assets - Endowment funds 

i 82,509 i 68,114 

xsassssa ssssscssssssss 

Liabilities and Fund Balances 

Current liabilities: 
Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 

Total liabilities 

Fund balances: 

Unrestricted funds 

Endowment funds 

Property and equipment funds 

Total fund balances 



Assets 








1987 


1986 




$ 24,837 


i 13,240 




834 


1,126 




16,540 


19,711 




42,211 


34,077 




12,023 


11,683 




14,576 


13,728 




32,786 


25,360 




795 


800 




60,180 


51,571 




24,438 


17,534 




35,742 


34,037 




4,556 


- 



$ 2,067 


4 


1,917 


825 




825 


2,892 




2,742 


39,319 




31,335 


4,556 




- 


35,742 




34,037 


i 79,617 


i 


65,372 


i 82,509 


i 


68,114 



97 



LINCOLN CABLE TELEVISION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Jack K. Carver 

Gabe Farrell 

Josephine Gump 

John A. Klobuchar 

Nathan F. Parke 

Joseph Rosen 

Stephen R. Low, Chairman 

In 1987, the Selectmen concluded negotiation of a provisional 
cable television license with Nashoba Communications. The license was 
signed and issued on April 27. 

The provisional license term is one year. Under its terms, 
Nashoba is required to submit detailed information about the system it 
intends to build and operate, and to prove its ability to do so. 

Whereas in April, Nashoba indicated its desire to begin 
construction in the fall, by the close of the year, it was delayed and 
obligations under the provisional license had not been met. Following 
successful compliance with the provisional license terms, the Selectmen 
can issue the final license that is required before actual construction 
can commence. 

This Committee was charged first with investigating the 
feasibility of bringing cable television services to the Town, and then 
with assisting the Selectmen in pursuing the state mandated licensing 
process. With the signing of the provisional license in April, this 
Committe has concluded its work. We note that under terms of the Town's 
Issuing Authority Report, the Selectmen are obligated to appoint a 
successor committee to oversee the operation of the system following the 
issuance of a final license. 

The Committee appreciates the strong support of the Selectmen and 
looks forward to successful implementation of a cable television system 
for Lincoln in 1988. 



98 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

John Ritsher 

Richard Wiggln 

Beth Sutherland, Chairman 

The two major threats to the Town of Lincoln which had arisen in the 
latter half of 1986 continued to dominate the efforts of the 128 Area 
Committee. The first was Bay Colony's decision to construct a back-door 
access to their property on Winter Street in Waltham at the Lincoln line. 
The second was Boston Properties' proposal to construct upwards of 1.1 
million square feet of office space on the parcel of land adjacent to the 
Bay Colony Corporate Center and fronting on Old County Road in Waltham. 

In both instances the traffic generated by these commercial 
enterprises threatened to overwhelm the town roads. The Bay Colony 
proposal would have allowed traffic traveling to the corporate center in 
the morning to circumvent the one way segment of Winter Street. Although 
the Boston Properties land is located in Waltham, a quirk of geography 
renders it accessible only via Old County Road in Lincoln approaching 
either from the north or the south. Therefore, all cars entering or 
exiting from an office complex constructed on this land (as many as 17,000 
vehicle trips a day) , would have to travel on town roads to reach major 
highways. 

Faced with these enormous threats, the Committee sought legal advice 
regarding possible ways to protect the Town and the residents living in 
the immediate area. They met with a number of attorneys specializing in 
real estate and municipal law, who provided valuable counsel. Members 
also met with the County Commissioners, and officials of the State 
Department of Public Works and the Executive Office of Transportation and 
Construction. 

Initially it appeared that Bay Colony might delay construction of 
their rear driveway. However, in November they applied for a special 
permit to commence construction of Phase III. Their plans clearly showed 
an access drive onto Old County Road. In addition, they petitioned for 
changes to Phase II, which was still under construction. The traffic 
study which they commissioned for Phase III showed a 40% increase in total 
car trips for the entire center and projected that 30%, as opposed to the 
5% originally predicted, would turn toward Lincoln. In comparison with 
their initial traffic study, these figures show an eight fold increase in 
cars travelling through the town. 

The Lincoln Planning Board testified at the Waltham City Council 
hearing on both petitions, expressing vigorous opposition to the 
developers' plans, pointing out numerous problems therein and requesting 
specific mitigation. Impacted residents delivered similar comments. 
Several weeks thereafter, Bay Colony withdrew their petitions, but no 
cogent explanation was given. 

Although the year concluded with a temporary respite on this issue, 
the Boston Properties proposal posed far greater, long-term impacts on the 
Town. After completing its initial research into legal options, the 
Committee met with senior officers of Boston Properties to discuss its 
concerns. The main topic of discussion was the range of alternatives for 
road access. 



99 



Shortly after the first meeting, the Town learned that Boston 
Properties had initiated two petitions to the County Commissioners that 
would widen the right-of-way of portions of both Old County Road and 
Winter Street in Lincoln and Waltham to 60 feet to accomodate traffic from 
their proposed development. 

When residents in Lincoln, Waltham, and Westons learned of the 
developer's action, their reaction was swift and assertive. In only a few 
days' time, they garnered over 200 signatures on petitions to discontinue 
Old County Road from one town boundary to the next. 

Although both the developers and the citizens had submitted opposing 
petitions, committee members continued to meet with representatives from 
Boston Properties in the hope of reaching a compromise before the first 
hearing on the petitions. Lincoln's primary goal was to effect a complete 
separation of residential and commercial traffic through a rerouting and 
reconfiguration of the roads in the immediate vicinity. When it became 
obvious that Boston Properties was unwilling to agree to the Town's 
proposal, talks were broken off. 

On December 1, the County Commissioners conducted a hearing on all 
petitions relating to Old County Road and Winter Street. The session was 
attended by more than 250 residents from Lincoln, Waltham and Weston, all 
of whom, with one exception, vehemently opposed widening the roads. At 
the hearing the Commissioners announced that they had hired a firm to act 
as consultants on the matter, presumably to facilitate a solution to which 
all parties could agree. 

At year's end the consultants had made no contact with the Town, and 
the committee was preparing for a second hearing. It was clear that the 
quality of life in many of the neighborhoods in Lincoln was at stake, and 
every effort to marshall opposition to the road widening was being 
pursued. In particular, the City of Cambridge appeared to be a strong 
ally, as the road widening could pose significant environmental impacts to 
its reservoir. Town officials also sought to trigger a state 
environmental impact review of the entire Boston Properties proposal prior 
to the Commissioners rendering a decision. 

The Committee is optimistic that the final decision will provide 
some measure of protection for the town, but the struggle to gain this 
protection may be long, drawn-out and costly. If protection is not 
granted in the final analysis, however, the quality of life in Lincoln as 
we know it in 1987 could be seriously and irrevocably impaired. 



100 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Barbara Beal 

Lee Evans 

Ruth Kramer 

John Manzelli 

Daniel Spaeth 

Eleanor M. Wilf ert , Chairman 

In May of 1987 the BHAC was asked if its budget could extend and 
cover an unexpected repair bill for a ceiling/roof leak at the top of the 
back hall stairway. Voted in the affirmative. 

Our accomplishments since the last Town Report: 

1. Minor adjustments have been made for safer use of the electric 
stair chair. 

2. The safe has been removed. Space now being used for storage of COA 
equipment. 

3. The kitchen has been remodeled: 

New stainless steel sink, electric stove and 
microwave; cabinets have been rearranged and added; a 
table was shortened and refinished with a formica top 
to match the lower cabinets. 

At this point, the BHAC expresses its appreciation to Joe Mannarino for 
his knowledge and hours of labor to get into this kitchen all that we 
could for the least amount of money. 

4. A new chair rail has been installed in the downstairs meeting room. 

5. A hot water heater has been replaced (from the committee's budget). 

6. A HANDICAP ACCESS - NO PARKING sign has been installed outside on 
ramp side of building. 

7. The kitchen floor has been recovered as has the radiator outside of 
kitchen. 

8. The chimney has been repaired (another maintenance item). 

New business coming up: 

1. Discussion of the recovering of the Men's Room floor. 

2. The acceptance of a donation of 4 eight foot tables from Lincoln 
Grange 129. 



101 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William G. Constable, Representative 

Lincoln is an active member of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
(MAPC) which is the regional planning agency for 101 communities in the 
Metropolitan Boston area. Lincoln's 1987 contribution to the operations of 
the MAPC were paid. MAPC activities include providing technical assistance 
to member communities on land use planning, housing, economic development, 
environmental quality, transportation, and other regulatory issues. The 
MAPC provides a forum for regional planners to discuss major issues, and 
serve as the vehicle for comment on developments in the public and private 
sector which might have significant environmental impact. 

Under its new Executive Director, David Soule, the MAPC in 1987 
broadened its activities, including more active policy development and 
additional technical research on broad planning issues. 

In 1987, Lincoln received MAPC advice and information through the 
Town' 8 participation in the Hanscom Civic Advisory Committee and the 
Hanscom Area Traffic Study Committee. 

The Minuteman Area Group for Intergovernmental Coordination (MAGIC), 
consisting of several communities adjacent to and west of Lincoln, 
continued their examination of issues of mutual concern. 

Several other regional projects were produced by the Council for 
Lincoln and neighboring communities to promote sound planning activities. 
These projects included several how-to-manuals, such as The Catalog of 
Techniques for Preserving Housing Aff ordability , a compilation of methods 
that towns may consider implementing to preserve affordable housing stock; 
and The Growth Management Catalog , an easy-to-use reference book that 
describes more than 40 techniques, regulations, programs and services for 
managing growth. In addition, the council compiled and developed the MAPC 
1987 Sites Survey Update , which is a complete, current listing of vacant 
commercial and industrial sites in the MAPC region. The survey is a useful 
planning tool for anticipating or promoting locations for new development. 

MAPC has long been the receptor for comments concerning proposed 
highway and mass transit improvements. In 1987, the Council expanded this 
role to more active guidance of those issues, including active contribution 
to the analysis of the third harbor tunnel, Boston's depressed Central 
Artery and suburban congestion issues on Route 3, Route 9 and Route 128. 

By working with the local communities more forcefully, as well as by 
coordination with the Lieutenant Governor's Office and the Executive Office 
of Environmental Affairs, the MAPC has become a more effective force in 
guiding legislative policies and regulatory activities within the Boston 
region. 



102 



LINCOLN PERSONNEL BOARD 

Sam Donnell 

Scott Lathrop 

Joanne Hadlock, Chairman 

Throughout 1987 the Personnel Board, in conjunction with the Board of 
Selectmen, the Executive Secretary and the Finance Committee, worked 
closely together to conduct a comprehensive personnel study of all 
non-union Town positions. The purpose of the study was to clarify job 
descriptions and to establish the proper relationship among all positions 
in terms of duties and responsibilities. 

Olney Associates, a Boston-based firm, was retained to conduct the 
study which included job analysis, job classification, and a salary survey 
regarding comparable positions in area municipalities. 

The study resulted in updated and accurate job descriptions and a 
system of 23 levels ranking jobs based on multiple critieria. Salary 
survey information was carefully considered in developing a step system 
which allows for advancement and appropriate compensation based upon 
service within each level. 

The study was completed in July and details of implementation and 
administration were completed over the summer. The final results were 
presented to Town employees in October. In addition to providing updated 
and accurate job information, the study provides a strong basis for equity 
and objective personnel review in the future. 

An on-going task of the Personnel Board will be to appropriately and 
objectively administer the system as new positions are created or job 
responsibilities are substantively modified thus requiring re-evaluation of 
job description and current level. 

The final results, which are available for review at the Town Hall, 
reflect the time and energy of many individuals. The Personnel Board 
wishes to acknowledge and thank the members of the Personnel Steering 
Committee for all of their work toward this effort. 



103 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Douglas Harding 

Craig Hill 

Barbara Low 

Walter Salmon 

Carol White 

Mary Newman, Chairman 

OVERVIEW 





Term Expires 


Self -Perpetuating 




Self -Perpetuating 




Elected 


1989 


Selectmen Appointee 


1990 


School Committee Appoi 


ntee 1988 


Self-Perpetuating 





The Lincoln Library has continued to be an active center for the 
many kinds of literary and musical items so necessary to a town 
educational facility. Plans progressed toward the start of the addition 
and renovation of the present building. 



BUILDING PROGRAM 

The Building Committee members are: Douglas Harding, Trustee, 
Chairman; Carolyn Birmingham; Ellen Cannon; and John Kimball; Kathy 
Glick-Weil, Librarian; and Mary Newman, Chairman of the Trustees; the 
latter two being ex-officio members. 

The Committee continued meeting with the representatives of Graham 
Gund Architects to finalize construction drawings for the bidding 
process. Bids were opened in August, and a contract was signed later In 
the year with P & H Construction Co. Work on the project is scheduled to 
begin early in 1988. 

During the year costs of construction escalated with the result 
that the Library was in need of additional money to complete the 
building. Fund raising from private sources continues to enable the 
Committee to embark on the project. 

In October the Library moved its collection to the Smith School 
Gymnasium where it will function during the construction at the Bedford 
Road site. 

MINUTEMAN LIBRARY NETWORK 

During the year all twenty libraries In the Network went on line 
circulating books. Our patrons now have access to 2,000,000 items, 
including 600,000 titles. 

TRUSTEES 

Walter Salmon was reappointed by the Selectmen for a three year 
term to expire in 1990. 

STAFF 

There were four resignations during the year, all of whom have been 
replaced. Alexandra King was replaced by Mary Collins; Catherine Brannen 
by Jane Flanders; Jennie Brannen by Sheila Williams; and Kathleen Coleman 
by Dana Weigent. 

104 



PROGRAMS 

There were 262 programs of varied interest during the year with 
5,603 in attendance. 

Once again Ellen Cannon and Ethel MacKenzie presented the Wednesday 
Mornings at the Library series. This was the fifteenth year that they 
have succeeded in finding Lincoln speakers who have enjoyed special 
experiences in their professions, travels or recreational interests. 

On Wednesday evenings there were alternating programs of the Film 
Series and the ever popular Jazz Evenings. 

The Friday Morning Book Group increased its attendance for their 
study of the Development of the English Novel. 

The Children's Programs included the always popular activities 
related to holiday themes. In anticipation of the move to the Smith 
School an innovative program was developed in which a child could move a 
shelf of books by reading five books. Charts were kept to record how many 
shelves were "moved". The summer schedule centered on a folk song and 
story workshop, and included the Traveling Tide Pool from the Aquarium and 
concluded with a program by a magician. 

EXHIBITS 

There were six art exhibits in the Library and one display of 
sculpture on Library grounds. Details are given later in this report. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Some roof repairs were necessary during the year. 

FRIENDS 

The support of the Friends of the Lincoln Library is a very 
important part of the well being of the Library itself. They add to the 
facilities by providing funds for three museum passes - to the Museum of 
Science, the Children's Museum and the Aquarium. The Friends also funded 
the Children's Summer Programs. The copy machine is owned and maintained 
by the Friends. 

The Friends inaugurated a monthly book sale at Bemis Hall and 
provided the refreshments for an Open House at the temporary library 
location at the Smith School Gymnasium. 

Volunteers from their group in various ways at the Library. 

GIFTS 

The Library gratefully acknowledged gits from several residents 
during the year. Donations were received from the Barron Family; Dr. and 
Mrs. Bradford Cannon for art books; Mary S. Newman for purchase of large 
print books; and Mr. and Mrs. William Payne whose gift was matched by 
Digital Equipment Corporation. 



105 



EXHIBITS 



DeNormandie Room: 



Joan Tremble-Smith, Portraits and Landscapes. Paul Brooks, Pen and Ink. 
Students of Dudty Fletcher, A Mixed Bag. Gregory Gauvin, Photographs. 
Julie Summers, Photographs of the Galapagos and Ecuador. Annette Vincent 
Sketches of Lincoln and Australia. 



Other: 

Twenty Years of METCO : Drawings by the Children of Lincoln and Metco. 

Sculpture Garden at the Library by David Shapiro. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY, 198 7 

January 14 "Korean Discovery by Kayak" with Dan Dimanescu 

February 11 "The BRA - Guiding Boston's Future" with Susan 
Allen 

March 11 "Temples and Canals of Thailand" with Helen and 
Bruce Bare 

April 8 "Quest for a Useable Past - A Memorist's Concern" 
with Maurice Montgomery 

October 14 "The Constitution: A Bicentenial Perspective" 
with Katherine McHugh 

November 18 "Japan, America, and the New World of the North 
Pacific" with John Curtis Perry 



STAFF, 1987 



Kathy Glick-Weil 
Ellen Sisco 
Margaret Green 
Catherine Brannen 
Amy Gavalis 
Jane Flanders 
Virginia Chang 
Mary Collins 
Alexandra King 
Jennie Brannen 
Shelia Williams 
Kathy Rushby 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Kathie Brobeck 
Mary Spindler 
Kathleen Coleman 
Dana Weigent 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Services Librarian (Mar.- ) 

Children's Librarian (Jan. - Sept.) 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian (Sept. - ) 

Reference Librarian 

Library Technician (Apr. - ) 

Library Technician (Jan. - Mar.) 

Assistant Children's Librarian ( - Sept.) 

Assistant Children's Librarian (Oct. - ) 

Senior Library Assistant/Bookkeeper 

Clerk Typist 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Children's Room Assistant (Jan. - June) 

Children's Room Assistant (June - ) 

Custodian 

Custodian 



HOURS, 1987 

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 

Tuesday, Friday 

Saturday 



9:00 am to 8:30 pm 

9:00 am to 6:00 pm 

10:00 am to 5:00 pm except 

during July & August - closed 



106 



LIBRARY PAGES, 1987 



Anne Althausen 
David Art 
Persis Barron 
Ian Fitzgerald 
Neil Fitzgerald 
Joe Greeson 
Rick Guthke 
Chris Hays 
Peter Hillman 



Jason Jarvis 
Sarah Ludden 
Denise Messina 
Dori Phelps-Braun 
Selina Rossiter 
Craig Smith 
Josef Sorrett 
Gerald Taylor 



LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS, 1987 

Patty Arena 
Ellen Cannon 
Diane Ciaramglia 
Eleanor Donaldson 
B. Grim 
Linda Holland 
Ethel MacKenzie 
Sally Mansfield 



Milt Page 
Bill Poisson 
Peggy Schmertzler 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Phyllis Swift 
Martha Warren 
Ed Williams 



The Friends of Lincoln Library 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books and 
records to support the collection during the year. They 
Include: 



Abigail Avery 
Joe Azrack 
K. Balogh 
Bruce Bare 
Dr. Barnes 
Owen Beenhouer 
Kathie Brobeck 
Joseph Byrnes 
Cannon Family 
J. Russell Clark 
Alice Coolidge 
Kits Culver 
Nan Ellis 
David Fassler 
Frank Goodrich 
B. Grim 
Richard Hale 
MaryAnn Hales 



Nancy Hammond 

Jeanne Healy 

Elliott Hubbard 

Jane Langton 

Lincoln Historical Society 

Lincoln Minutemen 

Harriett Lutnicki 

Edgar Moor 

Mary Newman 

Frank Powers 

John Sharpe 

Nancy Stratton 

William Schwann 

Phyllis Swift 

Vincent Family 

Winthrop Walker 

William Walters 

Carol Wolfe 



Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received from the following 
people: 



Mrs. L.B. Anderson 
Josephine Ashley 
Howard & Andrea Brower 
Marilyn Buckler 
Kits Culver 
Ruth Hapgood 
Roger Harris 



John Ingham 
Dr. Ludwig Luft 
Alice McKennan 
Murv Moore 
Roy Raja 
William Ryan 
Irving Telling 



107 



STATISTICS, 1987 

General : 

Number of days open 278 
Fines Collected $3,472.88 

Acquisitions ; 

Books 

Inventory 1986 63,044 

Purchases 3,156 

Gifts 248 

Total Inventory 66,448 

Discarded or Lost 2,472 

Inventory 1987 63,976 

Books on Tape 

Inventory 1986 92 

Purchases 25 

Gifts _0 

Total Inventory 117 

Discarded or Lost 

Inventory 1987 117 

Records, Tapes, CD's, and A-V 

Inventory 1986 2,746 

Purchases 243 

Gifts 1 

Total Inventory 2,990 

Discarded or Lost 362 

Inventory 1987 2,628 

Circulation: 

Adult Books 40,259 

Children's Books 32,283 

All Other Materials 10,374 

Total all Materials, 1987 Circulation 82,916 

Programs : 

Adult Programs 57 

Children's Programs 159 

Non-Library Groups 46 

Total Programs 262 

Attendance 

Adult 1,480 

Children's 3,739 

Non-Library Groups 348 

Total Attendance 5,603 



108 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Board of Trustees 

John B. French, President 

Carmen Verrier, Vice President 

James Hopson, Treasurer 

Francis Moulton, Jr., Clerk 

Joseph Bower 

Robert Brannen 

Joseph C. K. Breiteneicher 

Irene Briedis 

James Foster 

Lynn Gargill 

Gregory Harney 

Steven Manos 

Meredyth Moses 

David Ogden 

Julia Pugh 

Barbara Sisson 

Arthur J. Stavaridis 

Margaret L. Wengren 

John R. White 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

John B. French, President 

The year 1987 may well turn out to be one of DeCordova Museum's most 
significant years due to two events which culminated late in the year, but 
were the result of ongoing efforts and activity throughout the year. 

The first of these was the reaccreditation of the Museum by the 
American Association of Museums, a process which, in the words of the 
Accreditation Commission constitutes a "rigorous, professional examination 
established by the American Association of Museums through the completion 
of the detailed written questionnaire and the study of museum operations 
by a senior examiner of the AAM Accreditation Commission." This procedure 
was established a number of years ago and DeCordova was one of the first 
museums accredited, and after ten years we came up for regular review. 
The standards have been refined and expanded since the early years of the 
program and it took considerable work and attention on the part of the 
staff to complete this process successfullly. Of nearly 6,000 museums 
nationwide, only 650 have been accredited and of those 307 have had their 
accreditation renewed. We are proud and delighted to have this 
endorsement of our institution and its operations by the major national 
organization which serves the museum professional. 

The second significant event has been the award in late December by 
the National Arts Stabilization Fund of a $433,000 grant, payable over the 
next five years. Once again, this was the result of an extensive 
examination of the Museum's operations by the granting organization. This 
grant will permit the Museum to pay off its short-term liabilities, and 
set up a working capital reserve which will be funded by the bulk of the 
grant. This expression of confidence in the Museum is both exciting and 
challenging; we will need to adhere to strict financial controls and 
reporting procedures (which have already been implemented), raise funds in 
addition to our budgeted gifts and grants, and put together and implement 
a financial and artistic plan covering a minimum three-year period. The 
staff, under Paul Master-Karnik's energetic and talented leadership, has 
worked hard to qualify for this grant; now we must all work equally hard 
to insure its planning and development requirements will be met. 



109 



The above may give the impression there is no artistic life at the 
DeCordova, only applications for money and recognition. This, of course, 
is not true; we would not have been considered for either of these awards 
unless the Museum's artistic exhibitions, the sculpture on the grounds, 
the school and the music, lecture and film programs had been of a high 
professional caliber. We look forward to enhancing the quality of our 
artistic presentations in the years ahead, as well as continuing to meet 
the standards set by the American Association of Museums and the National 
Arts Stabilization Fund. 

DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Paul Master-Karnik, Director 

The 1987 program year at the DeCordova Museum has been the most 
successful ever during my three-year tenure as the Museum's Director. 
Critical acclaim for the year's exhibitions has been both consistent and 
substantial. Art critic Robert Taylor, writing in the Boston Globe , cited 
our fall exhibition of Morgan Bulkeley: Two Decades among the top five 
highlights of this year's art season in Boston. These exhibitions have 
further substantiated DeCordova's mission of representing the work of 
living New England artists, as well as bringing to New England audiences 
the work of important American artists that would not otherwise be seen 
here. 

But exhibitions are just one aspect of DeCordova's multifaceted 
program. The Museum's growing collections have been receiving increased 
attention in recent years. 1987 witnessed the completion of a three-year, 
major conversation program to ensure the preservation for future 
generations of many significant works of art owned by the Museum. The 
enactment of complete Collections Management Policies to govern the 
professional care of works of art and the development of plans to renovate 
and upgrade the conditions of art storage areas are among recent 
accomplishments . 

Education, both in the same sense of art appreciation and studio art 
training, is the core of the Museum's public service. The DeCordova 
Museum School of Art continues in the forefront of community art education 
programs with expanded course offerings in many disciplines and for 
children. Among the year's important initiatives has been the 
establishment and staffing of a permanent outreach department, to extend 
learning opportunites at DeCordova to new audiences both at the Museum, 
and off-site at schools, local community organizations, and corporations. 

The 1987 Dorothy S. F. M. Codman Concert Series featured a new "Jazz 
at DeCordova" format. Inaugurating the annual series was Dave Brubeck, 
and this caliber of performing artist was sustained throughout the 
summer-long festival of classic and avant-garde American jazz. 

The recent reaccreditation of the DeCordova Museum by the American 
Association of Museums, and the award of a major grant from the National 
Arts Stabilization Fund to establish a restricted working capital reserve 
fund have given further regional and national recognition to the quality 
of the Museum, its programs and public services. These accomplishments 
have encouraged the efforts of the staff and the Board of Trustees in 
planning for the Museum's future. 



110 



MUSEUM STAFF - December 31, 1987 

Administration 

Paul Master-Karnik, Ph.D., Director 
Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 
Franco Riello, Accountant 

Curatorial 

Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, Senior Curator 
Lisa Weber Greenberg, Associate Curator 
Heather Lenz, Preparator 

Education and Programs 

Eleanor Lazarus, Assistant Director, Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Mara Abb, Administrative Assistant 

Carole Somol, Outreach Coordinator 

Nancy Ketterer, Docent Coordinator 

Robena Reid, Store Manager 

Gayle Rich, Performing Arts Coordinator 

Barbara Stecher, Research Assistant 

Development 

Denise Trapani, Assistant Director, Development 

Jeron Weinand, Membership Director 

Judith Hall, Membership Secretary 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Assistant 

Joan Sinatra Hathaway, Assistant Director of Development, Annual Appeal 

Carole Smyers, Administrative Assistant 

Joan Bragen, Corporate Program Director 

Meredith Strang, Assistant Director, Corporate Program 

Wendy Mackey, Corporate Program Assistant 

Barbara Barry, Functions Coordinator 

Ellen Primack, Public Relations Director 

Linda Kenney, Receptionist 

Janet Paulsen, Receptionist 

Lisa Dalton, Receptionist 

June Ekstrom, Receptionist 

Stephen Cucinotta, Guard 

Edward Chisholm. Guard 

Andrew Priest, Guard 

Barry Higgins, Mail Room Clerk 

Buildings and Grounds 

Robert Little, Superintendent 

Robert Bearchell, Assistant, Buildings and Grounds 

Frank Balduf, Special Projects 

Frank Priest, School Custodian 



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113 



BUSINESS COUNCIL - December 31, 1987 

Joseph C. K. Brelteneicher, President Beacon Management Company 

John Carter Aegis Fund 

Nancy Dube Digital Equipment Corporation 

Earl Flansburgh Earl R. Flansburgh & Associates, Inc. 

Richard J. Roby Bank of Boston - Central Region 

Ruth Scheer Cabot Corporation Foundation, Inc. 

Paul Schratter W. R. Grace, Amicon Division 

Linda B. Smoker GenRad Foundation 

Janet C. Taylor Raytheon Corporation 



114 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

John Perry 
Harriet Relman 
Allen Rossiter 

During the 1987 year, three Bemis lectures were held for the 
citizens of Lincoln. On January 30, the New England Conservatory Alumni 
Chorus and Dr. Clarence Boyer, noted authority on the origins and nature 
of Black American religious music, presented a concert-lecture on 
American gospel songs. On September 25, Maxine Kumin, a pulitzer prize 
winning poet from New Hampshire, gave a reading of her poems. And on 
December 4, Anthony Lewis, columnist for the New York Times, presented a 
lecture on the American constitution. 

Fees for the lectures and publicity were approximately $5,750. 

The next Bemis lecture, to be held in May 1988, will feature Doris 
Kearns Goodwin, biographer of the Kennedy family. 



115 



LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 

Trish Adams 

Irene Briedis 

Jane Cooper 

Eleanor Friedman 

Rick Lee 

Julie Pugh 

Barbara Sisson 

Margaret-Ann Rice, Chairman 

The Lincoln Arts Council met in April and October of 1987 to review 
applications and award grants from the Massachusetts Arts Lottery 
distribution. 

The Spring application awards were as follows: 

t 430 Hartwell School and Hartwell PTA for Halloween 

Installation of Haunted House, designed and supervised by artist 

Paul Oberst. 
$ 400 Contribution to "Art in the Park" event, a family oriented day of 

exhibits, demonstrations, performances and sale of student art work. 
$ 150 Suzannah Holt Farny, New England Youth Philharmonic Orchestra Tour 

of Israel. 
t 150 Natasha Holt Farny, New England Youth Philharmonic Orchestra Tour of 

Israel. 



$1,130 awarded 

$ 12 expenses held in Town Treasury 

Performing Arts Students Series (PASS) Grants: 

t 300 Hanscom Middle School for tickets to "Romeo and Juliet", North Shore 

Music Theater. 
i 255 Brooks School for tickets to "Romeo and Juliet", North Shore Music 

Theater. 

The Fall application awards were as follows: 

$ 300 Friends of the Lincoln Library to support a Live Jazz Concert at 

Pierce House. 
$ 700 Hartwell School for African Cultural Arts Workshop and trip to Kenya 

exhibit at the Museum of Science (Conditional Approval). 
$ 200 Sudbury Community Arts Center to support the concert performance of 

the Boston Classical Orchestra at Lincoln Sudbury Regional High 

School. 



$1,200 awarded 

$ 34 expenses held in Town Treasury 

$ 305 for the PASS (Performing Arts Students Series) Program held over for 
Spring 1987 distribution. 

The principal objectives of the Arts Lottery are (1) to promote and 
maintain the vitality of existing cultural resources, (2) to insure the 
continued contribution and value of these resources to the Commonwealth, 
the local communities and their residents, and (3) to involve as many 
citizens as possible in some aspect of cultural activity. Since Lincoln 
receives a relatively small allotment of lottery funds, the Lincoln Arts 
Council has adopted a policy of awarding grants to applications that will 
very directly benefit the community of Lincoln. 



116 



CONSTITUTION BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Patricia Crandall 

Patricia D. Gray 

Roberta Kanarek 

William Litant 

Paul Marsh 

Margaret Martin 

James McHugh, Co-Chairman 

Katherine McHugh, Co-Chairman 

The Constitution Bicentennial Celebrations Committee was appointed by 
the Selectmen in early 1987 with a mandate to encourage and carry out 
celebratory events, events reflectiong upon the origins and current meaning 
of the Constitution, and the creation of a permanent memorial of the 
Bicentennial celebration for the Town. During 1987, the Committee 
consisted of Co-Chairs Kathy and Jim McHugh together with Peg Martin, Pat 
Crandall, Pat Gray, Paul Marsh and Ronnie Kanarek. The Committee 
concentrated its efforts on events designed to remind citizens of Lincoln 
of the origins of our federal government. The Committee has carried out 
its mandate by encouraging other town organizations to plan events 
commemorating the Bicentennial and by planning several of its own events as 
well. 

The "kickoff" event was the Fourth of July celebration and parade 
which adopted the Bicentennial theme. The Committee itself entered a float 
in the parade, thanks to the cooperation of the Lincoln Historical Society 
and Peg Martin who, with her husband actually designed and built the 
float. Although its prize-winning float was handsome and thematic, the 
Committee was red, white and blue with envy to discover a beautiful flag 
bearing the official National Bicentennial Commission insignia on the float 
entered by the Lincoln Grange. 

Over the summer, Pat Gray spearheaded the mobilization of the Lincoln 
Schools for the Bicentennial celebration. Finding ways to assist the 
schools in commemorating the Constitution had been from the outset one of 
the Committee's highest priorities. Pat arranged for kiosks obtained from 
the National Bicentennial Commission and sponsored locally by A. H. 
Tetrault, Inc. and Baybanks to be in the corridor at Hartwell throughout 
the Fall. Hartwell School also purchased a supply of a commemorative 
historical edition of USA TODAY for use in the classroom. This newspaper 
contained a number of short interesting articles about life in the 1780' s, 
about the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, and about modern 
interpretation of the Constitution in everyday life, which made it a very 
versatile classroom tool. Beverly Wooster of Brooks School designed a year 
long Social Studies workplan for the celebration of the Bicentennial, which 
is imaginative, creative, and highly substantive. Her plans include an 
essay contest, the development of a Brooks Constitution entirely written by 
students and including a "Student Bill of Rights". In February, consistent 
with the two hundredth anniversary of Massachusetts' ratification of the 
U.S. Constitution, Brooks students will ratify their Constitution by a vote 
of the entire student body. This will be supplemented with classroom work 
on the Constitution throughout the year, both from the standpoint of 
history and government, and the year will culminate with an all school 
quiz, aided by individual copies of the Constitution provided through the 
National Bicentennial Commission. 



117 



Other events during the Fall Included a nationwide bell ringing on 
September 17, the day on which the Constitutional Convention finished Its 
work in Philadelphia 200 years earlier. All of the Lincoln churches 
participated. On September 20, those in attendance at Sunday services at 
the three churches were treated to sermons which focused on the freedom of 
and from religion guaranteed by the Constitution. Still later In the Fall, 
Kathy McHugh gave a lecture on the Constitution as the opening lecture of 
the Library Lecture Series for 1987-88. Almost contemporaneously, the 
Library announced its creation of a collection of writings about the 
Constitution. That collection is made possible by the generosity of the 
National Bicentennial Commission and the Lincoln Minutemen. Finally, the 
Bemis Free Lecture Series treated Lincoln residents to New York Times 
columnist Anthony Lewis speaking with eloquence and scholarship about the 
Constitution in early December at Brooks Auditorium. The Bemis Trustees 
plan a Spring lecture by Doris Kearns Goodwin about the Presidency. 

The Committee decided to add a dash of fun to the serious side of the 
Bicentennial celebration with a Ratification Ball, to be held on 
February 6, 1988, the bicentennial of Massachusetts' ratification of the 
Constitution. The ball will be held at the Decordova Museum, thanks to the 
generosity of its Board of Trustees, and will feature the Winiker 
Orchestra. The Ball Committee is chaired by Ronnie Kanarek, and includes 
Pat Crandall, Gloria Hachikian, Kathy McHugh, Patti Salem, Wendy Kameny, 
Linda McConchie, Judy Hall, and Lee Harrison. 

The other feature event of the Bicentennial celebration will be a 
debate on the floor of the regular 1988 Lincoln Town Meeting as to whether 
or not Lincoln would recommend ratification of the Constitution in the form 
it is today or with some additional amendments or changes. The group 
planning this event is led by Jim McHugh and includes both committee 
members and others recruited for the event. They will be prepared to 
discuss potential changes in the war powers granted by the Constitution, 
aspects of the Constitution which might relate to the economy and the 
national deficit, and potential changes concerning individual privacy. The 
floor will be open for debate and other amendments can be proposed and 
discussed form the floor as well. 

After the Town meeting, the committee's primary remaining task will 
be selection of a permanent memorial to the Bicentennial. Several options 
for a memorial are being considered under the auspices of a subcommittee 
chaired by Peg Martin. The committee hopes to have the permanent memorial 
in place by early fall. 

Service on the Bicentennial Committee has been dedicated and high 
quality, and the members have had fun at the same time. We will look with 
some regret upon the moment in 1988 when the Committee will have discharged 
its responsibilities and will disband. 



118 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams 

Monika Duborg 

Liza Evans 

George Seely 

Rob Todd 

John Walker, Chairman 

Lee Evans, Director 

1987 saw the opening of the Codman Bathhouse, substantially improving 
the convenience of the pool. Mike Feldstein, Codman' s new director, 
organized lessons and led the Codman Swim Team to a third place finish in 
the Minuteman league. The most enjoyable swim team ever according to one 
participant. 

Cultural events, physical activities, and craft sessions keep 
Lincoln's adult population busy. Co-sponsoring programs with the Lincoln 
Council on Aging adds another dimension to both groups. Youth programs 
range from monthly Middle School dances and ski weekends to music classes, 
gymnastics, and magic classes for pre-school and elementary-age children. 
The Middle School Student Counsil meets regularly with the Recreation 
Director to plan activities for that age group. The Summer Day Camp 
continued its association with the DeCordova Museum for a third year. Camp 
Director Joe Giordano expanded the already full program with a music 
specialist and other exciting activities. 

The tennis courts were busy with recreational players, tennis lessons 
for adults and children, two tennis tournaments, and a tennis camp for one 
week in June. A part-time court monitor helped raise an additional $1,500 
for the town through tennis sticker sales. 

The Committee received as a gift a new Macintosh computer from Henry 

Harrison. This has enabled the Recreation Director to improve the 

organization of activities, track participants, create brochures, and 
handle finances. We are very grateful to Henry. 



119 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Sally Bobbitt 

Wendy Kameny 

Michaela Lipsey 

Thomas Hunsader, Hanscom Representative 

John O'Malley, Hanscom Representative 

Joan Walker 

Wilson Hayes, Chairperson 

This has been a dynamic year for both the Lincoln Schools and the 
School Committee. After several years of declining enrollement, the 
Lincoln campus population is now increasing and the changes associated 
with this growth have been a major focus of attention. We have carefully 
considered class size policy as our Kindergarten enrollment expands and 
have continued to monitor the transition of the fifth grade to the Brooks 
Middle School. The school population on the Hanscom campus is increasing 
at an even faster rate than Lincoln's and this has required that we help 
plan for a major school construction project on the Base. In other areas, 
the School Committee is continuing work on the Lincoln Campus building 
renovations voted at last year's Town Meeting. We have also helped METCO 
celebrate its 20th year and addressed the unique opportunities and 
responsibilities associated with a school system composed of the Lincoln, 
METCO and Hanscom communities. At the request of the Library Trustees, we 
have made the Smith Gym available as a temporary home for the Town Library 
while the new Library construction is underway. We have also worked 
closely with the Town Finance Committee to find funds to cover the 
State-mandated tuition and transportation expenses for a number of new 
Special Education students who have recently and unexpectedly moved to 
Lincoln. And through all these activities, we have continued to work with 
administrators and staff to help provide an educational experience that, 
through its diversity of offerings, its electives program and its strong 
curriculum will help prepare our children for the wide variety of futures 
they will choose. 

CURRICULUM 

The quality of an educational program is dependent upon the 
excellence of its professional and administrative staff, the availability 
of materials, equipment and a modern physical plant, and the existence of 
high standards In curriculum. In the final analysis, it is the curriculum 
that is the heart of the educational program and if there is breadth and 
depth lacking in this element, we cannot provide a high quality 
education. Over the years, through the efforts of individual teachers and 
the work of curriculum groups in a wide variety of committee structures, 
we have maintained a superior instructional program without that level of 
curriculum construction and maintenance which a high quality program 
demands. Curriculum work has of course continued and this year has been 
no exception. Progress has been made in Reading, Language Arts and Social 
Studies. The Science Committee has recently provided a comprehensive 
curriculum report and recommended pilot testing of the Science Curriculum 
Instructional Improvement Study (SCIIS) kits in the schools. Despite such 
progress in individual curriculum areas, the curriculum development 
process has been characterized over the years by inconsistency, lack of 
direction, highly variable documentation and lack of evaluation. 

For several years, the Administration and the School Committee have 
considered a number of approaches to curriculum development. Through this 
experience, we have become convinced that the demands on our principals 
are so great that it is difficult, if not impossible, for them to lead the 
curriculum development process. We are therefore recommending that we 
establish a new administrative position, that of Curriculum Coordinator, 
to be funded equally by the Lincoln and the Hanscom budgets. We have made 



120 



this recommendation after much deliberation and with full realization of 
its financial impact. We consider this new position to be so important, 
however, that it meets the Finance Committee guideline that additional 
staff should be considered only if "absolutely necessary to provide an 
essential service which could not be accomplished with existing staff". 
With a Curriculum Coordinator solely responsible for curriculum and staff 
development, we think we could provide the knowledge base, the 
consistency and the on-going evaluation which we so sorely need. If we 
wish to maintain a high quality educational system, we must have a high 
quality curriculum that is consistently utilized and regularly 
evaluated. Because of the press of their many other responsibilities, 
existing administrators cannot discharge this responsibility. Therefore 
we are urging your support of our request to establish a Curriculum 
Coordinator for the Lincoln School System. 

LINCOLN CAMPUS BUILDING RENOVATIONS 

In 1985-86, as part of our long range planning, we commissioned The 
CO/OP, a non-profit educational management organization, to conduct a 
comprehensive study of the Lincoln campus facilities and to project our 
potential capital expenditures for the ensuing five years. After careful 
study of the CO/OP report, the School Committee identified certain high 
priority roofing, heating and lighting repairs and recommended a phased, 
four year approach to complete the repairs. However, since the program 
was to cost $560,000, the Finance Committee suggested that we combine all 
the repairs in a single project rather than spread the cost over several 
years. A detailed presentation of the renovations and their cost was 
made at the 1987 Town Meeting and a warrant article to proceed with the 
renovations was approved. The timeline for the remainder of the project 
calls for preparation of plans and specifications by February, 
advertising and selection of a contractor in March, and completion of 
repairs during July and August, prior to the opening of school in the 
fall of 1988. We are currently well within schedule and look forward to 
the completion of much needed repairs to the building roofs, and to major 
improvements in energy efficiency in the heating and lighting systems. 

HANSCOM CAMPUS NEW CONSTRUCTION 

For the past 27 years, the schools on the Hanscom Air Force Base 
have been administered by the Lincoln School system under a special 
agreement between Lincoln and the Department of Defense. A number of 
advantages accrue to Lincoln from this arrangement. Hanscom shares 
equally in system-wide costs for our central administrative staffs, 
including those of the Superintendent, the Business Manager, the Director 
of Pupil Services and the Director of Plant Operations and Maintenance. 
Without the agreement with Hanscom, it would be impossible to maintain 
such an administrative structure in a small system such as ours. 
Moreover, faculty and staff working on each campus are hired by and 
tenured to the system as a whole and this has provided much needed 
flexibility in staff placement during fluctuations in enrollment on the 
two campuses. 

The Hanscom primary and middle schools were built in 1959 to 
accommodate about 300 children and the population has grown as two major 
additions have been made to base housing. Over the years, additional 
students were accommodated by "temporary" trailers, many of which have 
been in use over 10 years and are deteriorating rapidly. Presently, the 
Hanscom campus enrollment is about 600 students and another housing 
project involving an additional 163 units has just been completed. With 
the additional students expected from this new housing, the already 
substandard facilities and overcrowded conditions in the Hanscom Schools 
will become intolerable. 



121 



Fortunately, a $ 4.4 million Military Construction Bill has 
recently been approved for Hanscom due to the Increase in Base 
population. This bill had the strong support of the combined 
Massachusetts congressional delegation including Senators Kennedy and 
Kerry and Congressmen Atkins, Mavroules and Markey. The bill will 
provide for significant new construction for Hanscom primary and 
extensive remodelling and additions to the middle school. These changes 
will not only update the facilities but eliminate the need for trailers. 
The construction is to begin in June 1988 and we expect completion within 
L8 months. 

MJETCO 

METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity) was 
founded 20 years ago to provide educational opportunities in suburban 
schools for inner city children and to help address racial imbalances in 
those suburban schools. As one of 33 cooperating towns in the METCO 
program, about 90 Boston children are bused each day to Lincoln where 
they comprise approximately 20% of the student population. The richness 
of experience and diversity of background provided by the METCO students 
helps to broaden what might otherwise be a relatively narrow experience 
in the Lincoln public schools. However, with these opportunities come 
additional responsibilities to help establish and keep open lines of 
communication at all levels within a system made both richer and more 
complex by the inclusion of students and parents from the greater Boston 
community. These responsibilities fall in part to the parent-sponsored 
METCO Coordinating Committee and in part to Lincoln's excellent METCO 
staff. Recently, major responsiblity for encouraging open communication 
has been taken by the children themselves. 

During the 1986-87 school year, under a grant from Massachusetts 
Council for the Humanities and Arts students from Lincoln, METCO and 
Hanscom produced a video docudrama entitled "A Tale of Three Cities" 
which focused on the similarities and differences between each of these 
communities. The docudrama and the discussions which it stimulated raised 
some specific concerns and questions regarding expectations and 
perceptions of METCO students. These issues were taken very seriously by 
staff, administrators and School Committee and as a result an assessment 
of the Lincoln METCO Program was established as a goal for school year 
1987-88. In September, Dr. William McMullen was hired as a consultant to 
assist the Lincoln Campus in addressing the concerns raised by the 
docudrama. Dr. McMullen has recently completed his assessment and made 
recommendations which will be taken by the School Committee and the 
Administrative Team to develop a program of action to help promote 
communication within the schools. 

In other METCO related areas, an Information Forum was held at the 
Brooks School in December to help celebrate METCO' s 20th anniversary in 
Lincoln. Presentations were made on the history of METCO, on the 
activities of the METCO Coordinating Committee, and on the METCO budget. 
The schools also conducted an Institue Day with the theme of 
Multicultural Education and the suggestions and materials presented are 
currently being used in classrooms and libraries throughout the system. 

FIFTH GRADE TRANSITION 

The final planning phases in the two-year preparation for the 
integration of the fifth grade into Brooks School took place during 
winter and spring of 1986-87. A Transition Committee composed of 
administrators and teachers met weekly and made recommendations on grade 
structure and scheduling, program content and delivery, extracurricular 
participation, availability of library books, and room placement. These 
issues were discussed at public meetings with parents, with educational 



122 



consultants and with staff from other schools undertaking similar 
changes. The Transition Committee report was submitted to the School 
Committee in May 1987 and their implementation began in late spring with 
the initial transition process for the incoming fifth grade class. This 
was followed during the summer by extensive fifth grade curriculum 
development by Brooks teachers in English, social studies, science, math 
and foreign language. 

This past fall, an enthusiastic and flexible class of forty-three 
fifth grade students arrived at Brooks for a special orientation prior to 
the opening of school. The careful groundwork laid by the Transition 
Committee resulted in a successful and smooth fall term for these 
students who also have had to adjust to a school environment of older 
children, participation in electives, foreign language, and intramural 
programs. As had been predicted by the Transition Committee, some 
modifications of the program and schedule were required. These have 
included the addition of formalized, longer recesses and an additional 
day of electives for the winter and spring terms. Issues of the 
transition, student life, and academic structures are continually being 
reviewed by the administration and the 5/6 teachers, and by the 
Transition Evaluation Committee. A report will be made to the School 
Committee in late spring and we will then make recommendations for next 
year's program. 

EDUCATION OF SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN 

Under Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 766, all Lincoln children 
between 3 and 22 with special needs must be provided at public expense 
with an education that meets their special needs. Thus, if Lincoln 
children with severe emotional or physical handicaps need education and 
the Lincoln schools cannot meet those needs within its program, the Town 
must pick up the costs for their private tuition and transportation. The 
financial issues raised by this requirement are serious ones since new 
special needs children can move into Lincoln any time during the year. 
The question of how to provide resources for the ever-fluctuating number 
of children with special needs and still live within budget is a concern 
of both the School and the Finance Committees and the answers are not 
easy to find. 

Since May of 1987 and after passing the school budget at last 
year's Town Meeting, we have had several families who have children with 
severe special needs move into the community. In total, seven new 
children required outside placement, resulting in increased tuition and 
transportation costs of nearly $160,000. Since these were unanticipated 
increases to our approved budget, we have turned to the Finance Committee 
for additional monies from the Town reserve fund. This assistance, along 
with some transfers from within our Special Education budget, have 
allowed us during the current 1987-88 school year to meet our legal 
obligations to the education of these children. However, the increased 
expenses associated with the increased numbers of special needs students 
and the skyrocketing expenses for tuition and transportation will present 
financial issues for many years to come. While several of these students 
will become the responsibility of the Lincoln/Sudbury system in the next 
two years, most of our special needs children are very young and will 
require outside placements for many years. Lobbying efforts are 
currently underway to promote legislation to provide state aid to 
communities with unanticipated special education expenses. For the 
present, however, it is our responsibility as a Town to provide an 
education for all our children. The School Committee's 1988-89 budget 
request will therefore include the increased tuition and education 
expenses required to meet this obligation. 



123 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY USE OF SMITH GYM 

In March, just after Town Meeting, representatives from the Board 
of Trustees and the Building Committee of the Lincoln Public Library 
requested use of the Smith Gym as a temporary site for the library while 
construction and renovations are taking place on its permanent building. 
Although this presented difficult choices for the School Committee due to 
the use of the Smith Gym by some after school programs, we decided, after 
much discussion and consideration of alternate uses of available space, 
to approve the Library's request. After careful planning of the 
transition, the Library moved its collections to the Smith Gym in October 
1987 where it will be housed until the new construction is completed 
(projected for early 1989). While loss of the Smith Gym has had some 
impact on several school programs, use of the Library in these temporary 
facilities has actually increased in a number of areas and we are pleased 
to have made this space available to the Town. 



In these efforts, the School Committee, through Its excellent staff 
of administrators and teachers, is attempting to provide a school system 
which is responsive to parents, encouraging to staff, nurturing to 
children and fiscally resposible. We as a Committee are particularly 
grateful to our Superintendent, Dr. Elizabeth Twomey, for her 
contributions in all aspects of this mission. We are also grateful to 
the strong commitment the people of Lincoln have made over the years to 
high quality public education. We believe that Lincoln has a school 
system of which we can all be proud. 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Administrative Staff 



Elizabeth A. Twomey 
Juliana Marchessault 
Lois Taylor 
Robert Budds 
Carroll Blake 
Diane Nockles 
Jane Benes 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Superintendent of Schools 
Business Manager 
Director of Pupil Services 
Director of Plant Operations 
METCO Coordinator 
Principal, Hartwell School 
Acting Principal, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 
Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours 

The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through Friday from 
8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 



124 



CLASS OF 1987 



Charles F. Adams 
Sherry Naomi Adams 
David C. Art 
Lester E. Benn 
Heather Sinclair Black 
Evert N. Caceda 
Annya Callahan 
Julie Ann Cannistraro 
Robert Carroll 

Alejandra Carvajal Sotomayor 
Vaughn K. Chau 
Marcy M. Chong 
Bernd A. Com jean 
Zachary N. Council 
Alexander Edward Downey 
Kelly Driscoll 
Zoralya A. Elisa 
Amanda R. Fargo 
Antonino J. Fiscale 
Neil P. Fitzgerald 
Kelly Ann Flynn 
Andrew Francis 
Derrick Gordon 
Christopher Hays 
Toya L. Hightower 
Jason J. Jarvis 



Garnet R. Jones 
Xander Kameny 
Caryn Anne Ketteringham 
Torrey Lamonte Langham 
Margaret Elliot Leggat 
Sarah Williams Ludden 
Clevie C. Mandiville 
Abigail Karen Mansfield 
Corey Phillip McNair 
Matthew F. Moss 
LaShonda K. Moultrie 
Saya Murakami 
Elizabeth Nockles 
Richard Joseph Panetta, Jr. 
Marion A. Pantazelos 
Dasha Sharon Paul 
Laurel Pippen 
Richard L. Rollins 
Joanna E. Sampson 
Brenda Elizabeth Sartori 
Jessica Sanford Semerjian 
David Alex Silver stein 
John Henry Stam 
Rolf Kristian Taunton-Rigby 
Vanessa Anne Tomasic 
Carmen Michelle Winston 



125 



SCHOOL 



Hartwell 



Brooks 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1987 



GRADE 


SECTIONS 


STUDENTS* 


K 
1 
2 
3 
4 


3 
3 
3 
2 
2 


69(13) 

61(13) 

62(12) 

47(9) 

42(8) 


TOTAL: 


13 




5 
6 
7 
8 


2 
2 
2 
2 


43(7) 
42(7) 
41(10) 
45(10) 



•O-METCO students 



TOTAL: 



LINCOLN CAMPUS TOTAL: 



TOTALS 



281(55) 



171(34) 
452(89) 



Hanscom Primary 



Pre- 



Hanscom Middle 



TOTAL: 



19 



HANSCOM CAMPUS TOTAL: 
LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS TOTAL: 



80 
30 
80 
75 
65 



TOTAL: 


19 




4 


4 


66 


5 


4 


59 


6 


4 


61 


7 


4 


64 


8 


3 


54 



330 



304 

634 

1086 



CASE and Outside Placements - Lincoln: 12 

Hanscom: 18 



126 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Brooks, Vice Chairman 

Lynn B. Donaldson 

Ceraldine C. Nogelo 

David Pettit 

Phyllis Rappaport 

Neil S. Hickey, Chairman 



Education is a continuing process and Lincoln-Sudbury is an Integral 
piece of that intellectual celebration. 

Optimum education is achieved through a teamwork approach involving 
several parties: the School Committee, the administration, the faculty, 
the parents, and the students. This past year, the 1986-87 school year, 
was another successful year of positive blending between these groups. 

Sometimes our differences and our diversity can be the centerpiece of 
the school's strength and can add to the respect and dignity that we all 
deserve. 

This past year has been a busy one for the School Committee. Some of 
the projects completed - or in various stages of completion - are a 
refurbishing of the school's interior, the repair of the parking lot, the 
renovation of the all-weather track facility, the superintendent search, 
the ten year evaluation for accreditation, the settlement of a three year 
contract with teachers and the development of amendments to the Regional 
Agreement which are designed to help control the sometimes wide, yearly 
swings in the assessments to both communities under the current system. 

For the second year in a row Lincoln-Sudbury was the recipient of the 
Boston Globe's Dalton Award. This award reflects a combination of athletic 
success and high student/athlete participation. Certainly this is an 
honor. But let us not forget the many students involved in non-athletic 
extracurricular activities. Their value cannot be measured in "points" but 
is clearly valued by the entire community and we view them with the same 
importance. 

Lincoln-Sudbury is one of the finest high schools in the state. This 
has been accomplished by the student who has learned, by the parents who 
have supported their children and the shcool, the faculty who has been 
willing always to go that extra distance and the administrative team which 
has effectively carried out the day-to-day duties which allows the school 
to function at its optimal level. 

The groups mentioned above are under the supervision of the school's 
Superintendent/Principal, Bradford Sargent. His leadership style has 
incorporated good business principles while never losing sight of, and in 
fact blending, sound educational standards and humane, caring ways of 
implementing policies. This is a unique approach not often found in such a 
leadership position. The Committee publicly thanks the 

Superintendent/Principal for this creative management style. Mr. Sargent 
will be leaving on June 30, 1988 and we all wish him well. We sincerely 
thank him for his twenty-six years of service to the Lincoln and Sudbury 
communities. A position can be filled, but a person cannot be replaced. 

With everyone's united energies and the communities' support, 
Lincoln-Sudbury will continue its long tradition of excellence and retain 
its reputation as one of the brightest beacons of secondary education in 
the state. 



127 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the 
elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on Monday, March 30, 1987 and 
certifications of the results were received from Nancy J. Zuelke, Town 
Clerk of Lincoln, and Jean M. MacKenzie, Town Clerk of Sudbury, as follows: 



Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Total 


David S. Pettit, 

84 Pokonoket Ave., Sudbury 337 


1,174 


1,511 


Phyllis Rappaport, 

Davison Dr. , Lincoln 395 


930 


1,325 


Scattering 2 





2 


Blanks 200 


1,262 


1,462 


934 


3,366 


4,300 



Catherine T. Finelli 
District Clerk 



128 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Bradford H. Sargent, Principal 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School opened in 1987 with an 
enrollment of 1240 students. We anticipate that the enrollment will 
continue to drop to approximately 1000 students and then begin to increase 
once again. We have been fortunate, thanks to the support of the 
communities to offer an excellent program for all of our students. It is 
important to continue the diversity of offerings in the academic program as 
well as maintain the varied and rich extra-curricular program which offers 
our students so much. The high school is an important part of the life of 
each student. The fact that we have an excellent school is a reflection on 
the communities who ask for and receive this high standard. 

Most of the students continue their education after leaving 
Lincoln-Sudbury. The reports we receive from them indicate that we do many 
things well. We have solicited reaction from the most recent graduates as 
well as those who have been out for five years. The responses are 
gratifying and justify the high level of support you are willing to give to 
quality education. You have a school of which you can be justifiably 
proud. I share that pride with you. 

I have been most appreciative of the level of support the Town(s) 
have given to education and am confident that will continue. The students 
have benefited greatly from this support. 



129 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1987 



Peter Lincoln Abele 

Danielle Marie Abrams 

Susan Hamford Abramson 

Anita M. Amelia 

Christopher Amshey 
* James Michael Andelman 

Suzanne Michelle Anderson 

Elizabeth Anne Arees 
^Michael John Arnum 
*Farid Assarpour 

Khashayar Mohanimad Atabaki 

Tracy Ann Atkinson 

Richard Aucoin 

David B. Aufderhaar 

Alan Rafael Avila 

Leslie Elizabeth Baker 

Aimee Heather Bard 

Lukas Peter Barr 

Mary Elizabeth Bellows 

Kathleen Lee Bennett 

Vanessa Lyn Benson 

Andrea Berberian 

Janice Lisa Bially 
*Margaret A. Biel 

Leslie Wallis Bilosz 

Patrick James Birmingham 
*Joel Aaron Birnbaum 

Andrew Charles Black 

Nicole Blair 

Marcy Beth Bloomenthal 

Christine Lynn Bodoin 

David J. Boyd 

Matthew J. Branche 

Kristin L. Bresnan 

Christina Gale Brink 

Kimberly Diane Brock 

Hamilton Ashley Brown 

Jilian Heather Bump 

Kristin Marie Burke 

Corey Andrew Burse 

Steven John Burtoft 

Julie Susan Buxton 

Bonnie Jean Cameron 
Denise Marie Carignan 

*Elizabeth Joy Carleton 
MIna Dinease Carter 
Melissa L. Casella 
Franco Cento 

Scott Langley Chamberlin 
Christopher Newton Churchill 
Kacy Allen Clark-Williams 
Sharon Aubear Cole 

*Sharon Colligan 



Kathy Lystr Cooper 
Katherine Denise Corcoran 
James Cosgrove 
Michael S. Croel 
Jennifer Anne Cudmore 
Ellen Catherine Cullinane 
Christina Ann Cuomo 

*Christian Orazio D'Annunzio 
Robert C. D'Ottavio 
Thomas A. Damon 
Matthew James Dansereau 
Richard Francis DeFranco 
Maria Louise DeSantis 
Jason Anthony DelPorto 
Deborah Rachael Delman 
Evelyne Louise Delori 
Mark Allen Dence 
Tara Leigh Devine 
Alicia Ann Distler 
Rachel Elizabeth Donaldson 
Brian Donovan 
Jeffrey Scott Doretti 
Robert Joseph Dolron, Jr. 
Mark C. Dunham 
Felicia Durand 
Nathaniel Pete Durand 
Melissa Duven 

Anneliese Marie Eckhardt 
Kristina J. Emery 
Lesley Melinda Erskine 
*Robin Lynn Espinola 
Laura Sue Evans 

Todd Mitchell Faber 

Alayna Marie Nicole Fabrizio 

Laura Michelle Fagin 

Robert Dana Farmer 

Steven Mayo Farrar 

Emily Jean Feder 

David Mark Fertig 

Michael Fine 

Michael Fink 

Paul S. Fish 

Bradley Neale Fitts 

Erik Paul Fleischauer 

Julia Landry Foote 

Derek N. Foster 

Claude Francios 

Richard M. Frisiello 



130 



Daniel M. Gabbe 
Marianne E. Gainer 
Matthew William Gallagher 
Sara Ann Gardiner 
David Alexander Glass 
Lisa Glassman 
Laura Marie Ruth Gobbi 
Michael Charles Goldberg 
Elizabeth Theresa Gottmann 
William Grace 
Jennifer Lee Green 
Pamela Mercier Greene 
Mark Richard Grentzenberg 
Keary James Griffin 
Jordan Douglas Grothe 
Kristen Heather Gurtler 
Dana Leigh Guthrie 

William H. Hahn III 
Matthew Robert Hall 
Arthur W. Hall 
Jerald Halligan 
Tracey Hart 
Tina Marie Hasche 
Jennifer Ann Heck 
Edward Wayne Hoffman 
Hans Richard Hollister 
Mary Elizabeth Holman 
Hillary Frances Horowitz 
Fred Alvin Howell II 
Jerry Hsu 
Daniel B. Hunt 
Christopher Todd Hynes 



Brad Maclnnis 

Owen M. Mack 

Brendan Thomas Mahoney 

Kristina Anne Mainville 

Joshua Matthew Marchette 

Shawn Michael Marcoux 

Chad Margolin 

Jean-Pascal F. Marjollet 
*Joanne Marie Marotta 

Lisa Kristin Marotz 

Michelle Martino 

Mary (Lisa) Massei 

Daniel Maurer 

Michael Dieter Mayer 

Meredith Mayo 
*Emily Anne McCredie 

Gregory Christopher McDonald 

Ruthie Elizabeth McDougald 

Neil McGilvray 

Patrick Thomas McGourty 
//Richard Haley McMorrow III 

Sheila Gail McNeill 

Megan Melley 

Damon Connell Michaels 

Cassaundra Lashay Miller 
*Karen Jo Miller 

Carrie Suzanne Mitchell 

Eddy R. Morency 

Jane Ellen Moroney 

Michelle Mosca 

Regina Moss 

Maura Siobhan Murphy 

David LIndley Myers 



Barbara Ann Jarvis 

Amanda Hope Johnson 

Kristina Johansson 

Cynthia Joanne Johnson 

Dana Nicole Jones 

Ferzin Firoze Xavare Jungalwala 

David Kaplan 
Scott T. Kay 
Keith Michael Kelble 
Eugenia Michelle Kelley 
Moira Devon Kelly 
Paul B. Kenney 
Taasha King 
Amy Lynn Kleine 
Lisa Kristen Knapp 
Wendell Knox 
Amy Colette Kolb 
Daniel Robbins Kopelman 

Eddy LaCure 
Todd Lamoureaux 
Michael John Lanigan 
Brad LeBlond 
Trevor Carl Ledin 
Lynn Leone 
Amanda Lewis 
*Laura Liepins 
Benjamin Theodore Lonske 
Alison Baird Lovell 



Sharira N.I. Nabih 
Peter Nelson 
Kenneth Scott Neuhauser 
Richard Scott Nix 
Kevin John Novak 

Kimberly Anne O'Brien 
Kathleen 0' Connell 
Jamie Lynn O'Neal 
Greg Owen 

Gregory Brian Packer 
Sandra Pampel 
Yvonne Pappargeris 
Darcia Rochelle Parham 
Jennifer Jane Marie Patti 
Patricia Joy Paul 
Andrew Field Payson 
Derek Arelain Pearson 
Karlette Janice Peterkin 
Jean-Paul Peters 
Ernest Wayne Place 
Janet Louise Plank 
Laura Jean Piatt 
Indra Elizabeth Priede 
*Katherine Helen Pryor 



131 



Krisin Ragno 
*J111 Rapaport 

Denise A. Reardon 

Gregory Reutlinger 

Sharon Louise Reutlinger 

Allon Shalom Rlczker 

Suzanne M. Riley 
•Kenneth Alan Rltsher 

Lance D. Robblna 

Tlffanl Elizabeth Roberts 

Kelsa Monlque Robinson 

Shanna D. Rome 
*Alisa Beth Rosen 

Angela Nicole Rothenbuecher 

Jeanne Sanders 

Kimberly Santa Maria 

James C. Saraglow 

Louis Robert Sartori, Jr. 

Peter Francals Sayeski 

Carl F. Schiller 

David Robert Scholosser 

Brian Leslie Schwartz 

Melissa H. Schwartz 

Diane Rae Scialabba 

Martha Sesln 

Donald Seville 

Michael Steven Shanzer 

Andrew Gregg Shpiz 

Sam Silverstein 

Joseph A. Sims 

Douglas F. Sjolund 

Andrew J. Sliwkowski 

Shelley Anissa Smith 

Suzanne Elizabeth Smith 

Vanessa Suzanne Elizabeth Smith 

Adam Sohn 

Gall Kristen Sorensen 

Tracy Elizabeth Spang 

Robert Wayne Spiller 

Alfred L. Spittler 

Richard Matthew St. Germain 

John Charles Stacy 

Jeffrey C. Stadtfeld 

Jennie M. Staples 

Walter Henry Stowell III 

Lanlsja N. Summons 

Jennifer Lynn Surwilo 

Andrew Michael Sussman 

Stephen William Swartz 



Bruce E. Vail 
Bradford Heath Van Dam 
Lorna Sharon Van Horn 
Kirk B. Vazal 
Michael Thomas Viane 
Joseph P. Vivaldi 
*Ina Vom Feld 
Nicholas M. Vondermuhll 

Kathryn Ann Waldman 
Laura Jean Wallwork 
Jennifer Louise Walsh 
Jamie Whitney Ward 
Denise A. Washington 
Timothy D. Weaver 
Perri Sondra Weiss 
Stephen D. Whipkey 
Jeffrey Clayton Whiteley 
Priscilla Adams Whoolery 
Adam Gregory Wilburn 

*Andrea Price Williams 
Granger Keith Williams 
Tanya Diane Williams 
Kari Williamson 
Mary Joy Wilson 
Yvonne Lynn Wilson 

•Jennifer Lara Wolfman 
Elizabeth Anne Woolley 

Boris Yazlovitsky 

*Emily Margaret Zanzot 
Joanne Kristin Zola 



*Cum Laude 
#Honors in History 



*Dana French Tatlock 
Hugh Tatlock 
Jennifer J. Taylor 
Scott Earl Teabo 
Joshua A. Tevekelian 
Anjana D. Thatte 
Christina Michelle Thomas 
Elizabeth Anne Thompson 
Calliope Silver Thorne 
Susan Elizabeth Toeppner 
Michael A. Toomey 
Stephen John Treacy 
Jennifer Troxell 
Lorena Hyll'en Turner 



132 



DISTRIBUTION OF 


PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL 


HIGH SCHOOI 








AS 


OF OCTOBER 


1, 1987 








1983 




1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


Lincoln 


178 




186 


175 


172 


153 


Sudbury 


1,030 




1,021 


1,042 


978 


961 


METCO 














(Tuition) 


93 




97 


91 


97 


92 


Other 


6 




8 


10 


13 


14 


Total 


1,307 


1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


Boys 


674 




666 


670 


618 


601 


Girls 


633 




646 


648 


642 


619 


Total 


1,307 


1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


9th Grade 


314 




320 


340 


256 


264 


10th Grade 


355 




315 


337 


338 


258 


11th Grade 


327 




333 


317 


332 


348 


12th Grade 


305 




339 


314 


321 


336 


Other 


6 




5 


10 


13 


14 


Total 


1,307 




1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


Tuition Pupils attending 










other schools 39 




33 


35 


25 


20 



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134 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 

July 1, 1986 thru June 30, 1987 



Marcia Roehr, Treasurer 

Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1986 



$ 763,911.99 



============= 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1986 

Receipts 

Operating Accounts 
Sudbury Assessment 
Lincoln Assessment 

Total Assessments 
Chapter 70 
Chapter 71 
Transportation 
Construction Aid 

Total State Aid 
Chapter 188 

Total State Chapter 188 
School Building Rental 

Total Other Income 
Miscellaneous Income 
Petty Cash Refund 
Tailings 
Bank Adjustment 

Total Sundry Income 

Total Operating Receipts 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax 
Massachusetts Withholding Tax 
Federal Withholding Tax FICA 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 
Mass. Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Disability Insurance //l 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 

L-S Teachers' Association 
United Way 
Heys Memorial Fund 

Total Deduction Receipts 

Total District Fund Receipts 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME 



$ 472,126.45 



4,904,994.46 
891,556.30 

707,774.00 

435,964.00 

268,475.00 

52,310.15 

94,162.00 

24,186.00 

153,840.38 

1,000.00 

118.00 

0.20 



803,881.09 

241,604.63 

9,214.31 

64,245.53 

226,295.82 

70,232.60 

25,478.48 

258,927.73 

329,494.80 

15,696.52 

1,697.00 

242.00 



5,796,550.76 

1,464,523.15 
94,162.00 
24,186.00 

154,958.58 
$ 7,534,380.49 



2,047,010.51 
$ 9,581,391.00 
$ 10,053,517.45 



135 



Disbursements 



Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget 
Capital Projects 
Equipment 

Debt Service - principal 
- interest 
Total Budget Disbursements 

Prof essionaal Development Grant 

Lucretia Crocker Grant 

Horace Mann Grant 

School Improvement Council 

Petty Cash Advance 

Tailings 

Total Sundry Disbursements 

Total Operating Disbursement; 

Deduction Accounts 



7,000,896.53 

187,738.73 

154,134.56 

80,000.00 

12,025.00 



48,229.00 
21,917.00 
10,836.00 
13,180.00 
1,000.00 
89.92 



$ 7,434,794.82 



95,251.92 



i 7,530,046.74 



Federal Withholding Tax J 

Mass. Withholding Tax 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 

Blue Cross, Blue Shield 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 

County Retirement 

Disability Insurance #1 

Disability Insurance #2 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

L-S Teachers' Association 

United Way 

Heys Memorial Fund 

Total Deduction Disbursements 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND DISBURSEMENTS 



803,881.09 

241,604.63 

9,214.31 

56,886.56 

226,275.82 

70,232.60 

24,655.24 

34.16 

261,071.89 

329,494.80 

15,696.52 

1,477.00 

162.00 



j 2,040,686.62 
$ 9,570,733.36 



Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1987 
TOTAL REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



482,784.09 
310,178.60 



Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1987 
Cash Balance, Revolving Accounts, June 30, 1987 

TOTAL CASH BALANCE, June 30, 1987 



482,784.09 
310,178.60 

792,962.69 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1986 
Receipts - principal 



Scholarship Fund 
June 30, 1987 



- interest 

- springthing 
Disbursements - operating 

- awards 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1987 



187,366.56 

8,581.50 

14,175.16 

5,000.00 

693.09 

18,500.00 



195,930.13 



136 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Balance Sheet 

June 30, 1987 

ASSETS 

Bank of Boston $ (89,383.38) 

Baybank Middlesex 1,594.56 

Bank of Boston Money Market 597,097.78 

Baybank Middlesex Money Market 20,463.61 

West Newton Savings Bank 66,837.49 

Baybank Middlesex Zero Account 15.00 

Cooperative Bank of Concord 195,930.13 

Bond - State of Israel 407.50 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 792,962.69 

LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Tailings $ 118.00 

Surplus Revenue 435,746.33 

Professional Development Grant 66,837.49 

Lucretia Crocker Grant 77.46 

Roof Repair Project 5,542.00 

Blue Cross, Blue Shield 14,357.12 

Disability Insurance #1 5,036.36 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 27,226.28 

United Way 220.00 

Heys Memorial 80.00 

Donations 5,545.04 

Capital Outlay 10,431.81 

Urban Child Conference FY87 1,830.00 

Block Grant FY87 4,346.45 

Title II FY86 145.00 

Title II FY87 1,226.01 

Chapter I FY87 154.39 

Metco FY87 15.03 

Cafeteria 5,215.56 

Nursery School 1,906.96 

Athletic Fund 4,809.28 

Adult Education 4,587.45 

Library Copy Machine 1,171.04 

Scholarship Fund 195,930.13 

Bond - State of Israel $ 407.50 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $ 792,962.69 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 
State House Notes, $ 60,000 payable Aug. 15, 1987-88 120,000 

TOTAL DEBT $ 120,000 



137 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Sherry Adams 
Andrew F. Hall, III 
Mary Wiley 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee works with Lincoln high school 
students in need of financial aid. We meet with and interview each student 
making them aware of scholarships, grants and loans that might be available 
to help them cover their upcoming college expenses. We also review with 
them their calculations of anticipated expenses to insure that they have 
made ample allowances for the ever increasing cost of higher education. 

The Lincoln Scholarship Fund is designed to award aid to students who 
have been unable to close the gap between their present resources and the 
total estimated cost of attending college during their freshman year. The 
Committee recognizes that entering college freshmen have limited access to 
self help opportunities and thus they have the greatest need for assistance. 

The Committee also oversees two merit awards which carry with them 
nominal stipend amounts. These awards are given to outstanding young 
people in the community. The Sumner Smith Community Service Award was 
given to Stephen Domenichella and the Fanny F. Campbell Academic 
Achievement Award went to Jill Rappaport. Presentation of these awards was 
made at graduation and each individual was given proper recognition of 
their achievement. 

The annual appeal for funds from Lincoln residents continues to be a 
success as so many individuals feel that this is an important part of 
community spirit. In addition to the annual appeal, we were notified that 
the late Harland B. Newton made a bequest to the Lincoln Shcolarship Fund 
of $10,000.00. This gift is an important addition to our asset base and 
will provide an additional source of new earnings in the future for us. 

It is with many thanks that we acknowledge the fine work done by 
Elizabeth Downing over the last two years while serving as an active member 
of the Committee. She is being replaced by Sherry Adams who has the 
responsibility of overseeing the annual fund raising drive. 



138 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Dorothy and David Bagley 

Regina and Ralph Cuomo 

Maureen and John Dolan 

Carol and Steve Fisch 

Neil Hickey, LSRHS Committee 

Virginia Kirshner, LSRHS Faculty 

Claire and Pat Mullen 

Marcia Roehr, LSRHS Treasurer 

Rosalind Spiller, LSRHS Faculty 

Margaret and Vincent Surwilo 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Scholarship Fund, through 
the generous contributions of the citizens and business organizations of 
Lincoln and Sudbury, and the staff of Lincoln-Sudbury High School has 
achieved an endowment of approximately $180,000. This has been made 
possible through our annual fall mailing; income from Springthing, 
traditionally held the second Saturday in May; and by memorial 
contributions by individuals, families and groups. The success of 
Springthing is directly attributable to that large group of friends who so 
generously donate their time and talents. The Scholarship Fund Committee 
raises and administers the endowment. A Faculty Committee chooses the 
recipients based on criteria established by the Fund Committee. 

The Fund is available to any graduate of Lincoln-Sudbury with 
definite career plans and financial need. In June 1987, a total of $18,000 
was awarded to these outstanding students to whom the communities of 
Lincoln and Sudbury and the Scholarship Committee wish every success. 

The recipients of the 1987 awards were: 

Scholarship Fund Awards: 



Cristina Brink 
Denise Carignan 
Laura Gobbi 
Tracey Hart 
Joanne Marotta 
Darcia Parham 



Jennifer Patti 
Tiffani Roberts 
Alfred Spittler 
Jennifer Surwilo 
Lorna VanHorn 
Perri Weiss 



Mermorial Awards: 



Kirshner Scholarship: 
Wirzburger Scholarship: 
Arnold Scholarship: 
Hayes Scholarship: 



Richard McMorrow 
Brendan Mahoney 
Donald Seville 
Priscilla Whoolery 



Sudbury Foundation Scholarship: Kathy Cooper 



For information about the Lincoln-Sudbury High School 
Scholarship Fund, call the High School at 443-9961. 



139 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Term 
Expires 

Acton John W. Putnam 1988 

Arlington John P. Donahue, Chairman 1988 

Belmont Linda Frizzell, Vice Chairman 1989 

Bolton Peter Stalker 1990 

Boxborough Kenneth Whitcomb 1988 

Carlisle William Churchill 1988 

Concord Cynthia Griffis 1989 

Dover Robert B. Warner 1990 

Lancaster Fred A. Reed 1988 

Lexington Nyles N. Barnert 1990 

Lincoln Harold A. Levey, Jr. 1989 

Needham Tim Sullivan 1989 

Stow Mary E. Cutler 1990 

Sudbury Lawrence Ovian 1989 

Wayland Elaine Sweeney, Secretary 1990 

Weston John M. Tucker 1990 

Mlnuteman Tech has had another year of outstanding accompllshements 
by dedicated teachers, students and supporting industry advisors. Some 
examples are listed below: 

Minuteman Tech made history in 1987 as the first school in the 
country to win two consecutive national championships in the same event in 
the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) Skill Olympics. The 
event was the Auto Body skill competition won in 1986 by Mlnuteman Tech 
senior Peter Langan of Natick and in 1987 by Minuteman Tech senior Craig 
Curtis of Sudbury. Both winners received thousands of dollars worth of 
prizes from the businesses and industries which sponsor the VICA 
competitions. 

Another Minuteman Tech student, Jennifer Burkart of Bolton won the 
bronze third place medal in the national VICA Commercial Art competition. 
She will also be eligible to compete for a place on the Skill Olympics 
team which will represent the United States at the VICA International 
Skill Olympics to be held in London, England in 1989. 

In a ceremony in the Governor's office, Minuteman Tech teacher 
George Taliadouros was given the 1987 Presidential Award for Excellence in 
Science and Mathematics Teaching from the National Science Foundation, 
Council of State Science Supervisors and the National Science Teachers 
Association. Mr. Taliadouros also received a Special Recognition for 
Statewide Contribution to Vocational Education Award from the Division of 
Occupational Education of the Massachusetts Department of Education. He 
received these awards for his work in the development and pilot testing of 
the "Principles of Technology" program. This program, now being used in 
schools throughout the United States, combines physics and mathematics 
concepts In a powerful science literacy course. 

Minuteman Tech Superintendent-Director Ronald J. Fitzgerald was also 
honored in 1987 by the Massachusetts Department of Education with an 
Outstanding Achievement in Vocational Education award for his "leadership 
and innovation which has helped to establish and maintain vocational 
education in Massachusetts as a national model." 



140 



Minuteman Tech cosmetology teacher Sebastian Paquette also received 
recognition from the Massachusetts Department of Education for developing 
a model program which uses microcomputers to teach small business 
management in cosmetology. This program is now being replicated 
throughout the state. Another Mintueman Tech Cosmetology teacher, Sabra 
Haywood, has been appointed to the Fashion Committee of the new Aesthetics 
Division of the Massachusetts Cosmetologists Associaiton. 

ThelMassachusetts Department of Education has selected Minuteman 
teachers to develop a model curriculum in the expanding area of 
manufacturing technology. 

Minuteman Tech Commercial Art teacher Bonnie Hilla received a 
special award from the Massachusetts vocational Industrial Clubs of 
America for the work she did as VICA Art Director during the 1986-87 
school year. 

The Minuteman Tech Drafting Department has been designated as the 
official training center in Massachusetts for the VersaCAD and AutoCAD 
computer-aided-drafting systems. Minuteman students as well as adults 
sent to Minuteman by their employers can receive state-of-the-art CAD 
training and retraining on seven different types of CAD software. 

Minuteman Tech Child Care teacher Margaret Lawlor was asked to 
present a workshop entitled, "The Vocational Education High School and Its 
Role in Training Early Childhood Educators" at the 1987 conference of the 
National Association for the Education of Young Children In Chicago. 
Included in her talk was information about the very successful day care 
center which is operated in conjunction with the Minuteman Tech Child Care 
training program. 

Again in 1987 at the New England Flower Show an exhibit designed and 
constructed by Minuteman Tech horticulture students received four awards. 

In 1987 six Minuteman Tech students received their Eagle Scout 
Awards and two students received their Girl Scout Gold Awards. 

Minuteman Tech Special Education teacher Alice Burnham and 
Cosmetology teacher Sebastian Paquette were presented with Exemplary 
Teaching Awards by the Battle Green Chapter of DeMolay. 

Minuteman Tech graduate Dana Harrington of Belmont is serving as the 
student member on the Fitchburg State College Board of Trustees where he 
is a junior in Electronics Engineering Technology. 

During the summer of 1987, Minuteman Tech building trades students 
began constructing a superinsulated house on school property in Lincoln. 
This is the school's third house project in cooperation with a local 
community. 

After a year of planning Minuteman Tech opened a new microcomputer 
learning center in the fall of 1987. Under supervised contracts from 
various departments, students can take entire courses or carry out special 
assignments and homework projects with computer assistance. 

Service to adults was also expanded during 1987. In addition to 
enabling adult residents of the district to attend the school's full-time 
daytime programs as post-graduates, Minuteman Tech now offers adult 
short-term training programs. Now it is possible for adults to enter day 
programs to learn house framing, electronic assembly or a variety of other 
job skills without enrolling In the school for the 1/2 year post-graduate 
program. Academic support will also be provided as needed. 



141 



During 1987 there were several changes on the MInuteman Tech School 
Committee. Long-time committee member and Vice-Chairman Robert Jackson 
(Lexington), along with Ronald Howington (Stow), Robert Smith (Bolton) and 
Thomas Schendorf (Weston) all stepped down. Nyles N. Barnert is now 
representing Lexington, Peter Stalker is the new member from Bolton, Mary 
E. Cutler is the new Stow member and John M. Tucker is the new Weston 
member. Filling positions that were vacant at the beginning of 1987 are 
Fred A. Reed (Lancaster) and Tim Sullivan (Needham). 

In closing, the MInuteman Tech School Committee wishes to invite all 
residents of the 16 district towns to visit the school and enjoy the many 
student-operated services for the public which include a restaurant, 
bakery, gift shop, flower shop, beauty salon and service station. For 
information on when these are open, call 861-7150. 



142 



LINCOLN GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1987 



Paul C. Athanasopoulos 
Stephen Matthew Domenichella 
Carl D. Gainer, Jr. 



Auto Mechanics 
Horticulture (Forestry) 
Horticulture (Forestry) 



POST GRADUATES 
Claire Farrell 



1987 



Data Entry/Info. Proc. 



Town 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1987 



Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Graduate Total 



Acton 


10 


14 


16 


11 


2 


53 


Arlington 


44 


45 


47 


62 


25 


223 


Belmont 


11 


10 


13 


10 


12 


56 


Bolton 


3 


2 


5 


5 





15 


Boxborough 


3 


8 


6 


2 





19 


Carlisle 





1 


2 


1 





4 


Concord 


5 


8 


9 


9 


6 


37 


Dover 





2 


2 


1 





5 


Lancaster 


8 


11 


14 


10 


1 


44 


Lexington 


9 


10 


12 


13 


11 


55 


Lincoln 


1 


1 


3 





1 


6 


Needham 


17 


9 


6 


11 


6 


49 


Stow 


11 


13 


9 


12 


1 


46 


Sudbury 


9 


20 


10 


17 


5 


61 


Wayland 


5 


10 


3 


3 


8 


29 


Weston 


1 


1 


2 


1 





5 


Tuition 


22 


48 


60 


52 


10 


192 



TOTAL 



159 



214 



219 



220 



88 



900 



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145 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

Assessed Apportionments for operating and capital costs for 7/1/87 to 
6/30/88 based on the number of students from each member tovm attending 
Minuteman on 10/1/86 as a percentage of the total number of students, per 
section V (c) of agreement. Apportionments for special operating costs 
based on section IV (f) of agreement. 



TOWN 


PER CENT 


OPERATING 


+ 


CAPITAL + 


OPERATING 


MENT 


Acton 


8.680 


$ 435,917 


+ 


1,503 + 


1,257 


a 


I 438,677 


Arlington 


29.829 


1,498,081 


+ 


5,167 + 


3,411 


- 


1,506,659 


Belmont 


8. 435 


423,638 


+ 


1,461 + 


1,167 


- 


426,266 


Bolton 


2.567 


128,933 


+ 


10,564* + 


269 


- 


139,767 


Boxboroush 2.93A 


147,352 


+ 


508 + 


180 


= 


148,040 


Carlisle 


.367 


18,419 


+ 


271 + 


180 


- 


18,870 


Concord 


4.890 


245,587 


+ 


848 + 


628 


■ 


247,063 


Dover 


.734 


36,838 


+ 


3,018* + 


180 


= 


40,036 


Lancaster 


7.090 


356,101 


+ 


29,178* + 


2,963 


- 


388,241 


Lexington 


7.457 


374,520 


+ 


1,292 + 


1,212 


= 


377,024 


Lincoln 


1.100 


55,257 


+ 


191 + 


404 


« 


55,852 


Needham 


6.601 


331,542 


+ 


27,165* + 


1,032 


- 


359,740 


Stow 


6.601 


331,542 


+ 


1,143 + 


718 


■ 


333,404 


Sudbury 


9.046 


454,336 


+ 


1,568 + 


1,167 


■ 


457,070 


Wayland 


2.934 


147,352 


+ 


508 + 


494 


» 


148,354 


Weston 


.734 


36,838 


+ 


128 + 


763 


■ 


37,728 


TOTALS 


100.000% 


$5, 022, 254 


+ 


$ 84,513 + 


$16,025 


- 


$5,122,792 



♦Includes a $400 per pupil surcharge (MINIMUM 5 PUPILS) for 10 years 
to compensate 12 original member towns for debt service. 



STATE AID RECEIVED AND ANTICIPATED BETWEEN JULY 1, 1986 and JUNE 30, 
1987 



CATEGORY 

Transportation, Chapter 71, 16c $ 646,355 

Chapter 70 (includes Special Ed.) 1,638,748 
Regional Aid, Chapter 71, 16d 367,308 

Construction Grant, Chapter 645 107,817 

$2,760,228 

NOTE: State aid and District revenue are used to reduce assessed 
apportionments of costs to member towns. 



146 



VITAL STATISTICS 

41 births, 45 marriages and 27 deaths have been recorded during 
the year 1987 as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 

1986 
Dec. 14 



Name of Child 



Steven Paul Hopengarten 



Names of Parents 



Fredric Hopengarten & Betty Herr 



1987 

Jan. 8 Jason David Falender 

Jan. 10 Benjamin Garrett Page 

Jan. 17 Rachael Marie Jones 

Jan. 27 Danielle Regina Diarbakerly 

Jan. 30 Marie Louise Solman 

Feb. 6 Alessandra Julia Sax 

Feb. 25 Matthew Cheng-Hsi Wang 

Mar. 5 Sarah Alexandra Churchill 

Mar. 7 Lauren Rose Daniels 

Mar. 18 Kasie-Lynne Martin 

Mar. 18 Joshua Daniel Greenberger 

Mar. 19 Chelsey Elizabeth Whalen 

Mar. 21 Margaret McHenry Evans 

Apr. 5 Ashley Alexandria Dillworth 

Apr. 23 Field Minister Yates 

May 15 Alan Erik Szarka 

May 18 Daniel Alan Asadorian 

May 20 Nathaniel Albert Weiss 

June 5 Stefani Jean Torode 

June 23 Benjamin Koukalaka Foley 

July 2 Jacqueline Nicole Risser 

July 12 Myles Heveran Lathrop 

July 15 William Charles Hagenian 

July 16 Alexis Quincy Plukas 

July 22 Jordan Elizabeth Rice 

July 23 Raphael Stephen M. Vagliano 

July 25 Maren West Johnson 

Aug. 4 Catherine Mary Klem 

Aug. 29 MaryLyn Elizabeth Rando 

Sept. 13 Krista Marie Panetta 

Sept. 17 Meredith Bradford Miller 

Sept. 17 Lucie Bancker Miller 

Sept. 23 Susanna Pendleton Flint 

Sept. 28 Bohdon Amiel M. Sayre 

Oct. 14 Shaina Rose Low 

Oct. 17 Alexander Hunter Shaw 

Oct. 29 Jonathan Gregory Crosby 

Nov. 28 Conor McCall Deering 

Dec. 1 Benjamin Colt Bishop 

Dec. 19 Sally Ellen Mclnnes 

Dec. 22 Brian Daniel Kelley 



Andrew Falender & Jacquelyn Lenth 

Walter & Susan Page 

Bruce & Tracy Jones 

Mark & Regina Diarbakerly 

Fred John & Claire Solman 

Eric & Julia Sax 

Thomas & Jacqueline Wang 

Richard & Maria Churchill 

Grover & Starr Daniels 

Paul Martin & Margaret-Ann 

Villosio-Martin 
Joel & Catherine Greenberger 
David & Mary Whalen 
John & Elizabeth Evans 
Jonathan & Cheryl Dillworth 
William & Mary Yates 
Fredrick & Deborah Szarka 
Alan Asadorian & Melanie 

Hagopian-Asadorian 
Thomas & Elizabeth Weiss 
Steven & Susan Torode 
John & Lori Foley 
Thomas & Tranquilina Risser 
Scott Lathrop & Beatrice Heveran 
Mark & Sheryl Hagenian 
John & Anne Plukas 
Paul Rice & Irene Earle-Rice 
Andre & Leslie Vagliano 
Michael Johnson & Kathryn West 
Christopher & Susan Klem 
Thomas & Shelly Rando 
Frank & Vickie Panetta 
Stephen & Natalie Miller 
Stphen & Natlie Miller 
Warren Jr. & Margaret Flint 
Michael Sayre & Dereena Muckjian- 

Sayre 
Stephen & Barbara Low 
Michael & Lynette Shaw 
Gregory & Anne Crosby 
Paul & Margaret Deering 
Robert & Sarah Bishop 
Richard & Barbara Mclnnes 
Herbert & Robin Kelley 



147 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Jan. 10 Jerome C. Hunsaker, Jr. 
Alice W. McKennan 

Feb. 15 Frederick Christopher Gerhard 
Rachael Rebecca Keevll 

Feb. 28 John F. Foley, Jr. 

Lorl Lanl Anne Ranada 

April 11 Charles Anthony Morss, Jr. 
Anneke M. 0* Sullivan 

April 11 Philip H. Byrne 
Donna M. Donovan 

May 2 Fred Gordon Barning 
Therese Ryan 

May 2 David Jacobs 

Louise Aklllian 

May 9 Mason W. Freeman 

Gale Sherrard Haydock 

May 16 Winslow Martin 

Stephanie Lomond Merrill 

May 16 Steven C. Evangelista 
Holly Lynn Jones 

May 16 Stephen William Privitera 
Paula Jean Vogel 

May 23 Thomas Forest Farb 

Stacy Siana Valhouli 

May 23 John Tylko, Jr. 

Elizabeth Mary Ryan 

May 24 James Eugene Smith 

Joanne Patricia Lally 

May 30 Alfred Lincoln Kraft 
Madalon Claire Meany 

May 30 Victor Scott Gregg 
Laura Louise Bell 

May 31 Arthur J. Davidson 
Patricia W. Emmons 

June 6 John H. Sisson, Jr. 
Regana Contini 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Amherst, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Naples, Fla. 

Woburn, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Allston, Mass. 
Allston, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Milton, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Denver, Co. 
Denver, Co. 

McClellanville, S.C. 
McClellanville, S.C. 



148 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



June 6 William B. Eidson 
Donna M. Furlong 

June 13 Frederik D. Wiersema 
Catherine A. Boussard 

June 19 Edward A. Schwartz 
Linda K. Washburn 

June 28 Steven N. Shapse 
Carol Woolfe 

July 1 Peter Blackler 

Lindsay Sherman Burk 

July 5 William A. Phillips 
Constance J. White 

July 12 John M. Magliano 
Karen Josephsen 

July 19 Thomas Edmond Casey 
Carolyn Pratt Taylor 

July 25 Daniel Scott Bleck 
Kelly Marie Troisi 

Aug. 2 Bruce Martin Wellman 

Leslie Ann Cowperthwaite 

Aug. . 2 Hilary Malcolm Hawkins 
Charlotee Richardson 

Aug. 22 William Tandy Young 
Mary L. Coombs 

Sept. 5 Lloyd L. Miller 
Ann Donaldson 

Sept. 6 Craig Eugene Demmy 
Wendy Grace Arena 

Sept. 19 Michael H. DiToro 

Joyce M. Gilpatrick 

Sept. 20 Santi W. Lombardo, Jr. 
Sara Beth Mast 

Oct. 9 Addison D. Cole 
Ann Banks 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Attleboro, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

New Knoxville, Ohio 
Arlington, Mass. 

Hudson, Mass. 
Hudson, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Hampton, U.K. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Weston, Mass. 
Camden, Maine 

E. Providence, R. I 
Acton, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



149 



Date of 
Marriage 

Oct. 10 



Names 



Clint Allen Cummins 

Nancy Elizabeth Kerrebrock 



Residence 



Palo Alto, Calif, 
Palo Alto, Calif, 



Oct. 10 Paul Frederic Ross 
Susanne A. Werner 

Oct. 10 John J. Kelley, Jr. 

Ann Margaret Grindatti 

Oct. 17 Jonathan Spector 
Wendy I-Ning Li 

Oct. 25 Joseph F. Connolly 

Catherine C. Pfister 



Oct. 25 



John Edward Dumont 
Laurie Anne Cotoia 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Randolph, Mass. 
Nashua, N. H. 

New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Maynard, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Nov. 21 Abul Khayer 

Umme Salma Momtaz Alam 

Nov. 28 James J. Faran, Jr. 

Margery Palmer Collins 

Nov. 28 Scott Frank Boroczi 
Margaret Pike 

Dec. 5 David Conte 

Martha S. Phinney 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Denver, Co. 
Denver, Co. 

Natick, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



150 



DEATHS 



Date of 
Death 



Name 



Years 



1986 
Dec. 8 

1987 
Jan. 8 
Jan. 19 
Feb. 7 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 8 
Mar. 25 
Mar. 26 
Apr. 12 
Apr. 28 
May 10 
May 21 
May 27 
June 2 
June 19 
July 8 
July 11 
Aug. 11 
Aug. 15 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 26 
Nov. 7 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 23 
Dec. 13 
Dec. 31 



Mary Ann Deterllng 



Edith Goodman 

Alvin Levin 

Kathleen Elaine Harte 

Francis A. Stanaitis, Jr. 

Roland Wells Robbins 

Richard Hadley Jevon 

Alice Vose Booth 

Donald Joseph Flannery 

Harland Bowditch Newton 

Armond F. Ferro 

Francis J. Stewart 

Mario Morganti 

Eveleth R. Todd 

Gregory Peter Faddoul 

Jean R. Parsons 

Elizabeth M. Slayter 

Lillian Wanda Drake 

Richard Perry 

Marie G. Vernon 

Lucy Joan Chubb 

Isabel Titcomb Peirce 

Editha Freeman 

Frank A. Ryan 

Michael A. B. Stratton 

Wei Ying Chu 

Christopher James Dunnicliff 

Margaret St. Jean 



65 



76 
62 
80 
21 
78 
31 
74 
72 
90 
68 
78 
82 
81 
29 
55 
56 
74 
80 
76 
99 
90 
95 
87 
40 
66 
21 
31 



151 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



George Hibben 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell. 



Chairman 



DONALD CORDON RECREATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 
Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 
Bond Matured 



Less Payments: 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Transfer to MMDT 
Purchase Bond 
Accrued Interest 
Fees for Purchase 



i 1,178.32 
383.73 

1,000.00 

t 2,562.05 



7.50 

23.85 

980.21 

1,050.00 

31.91 

9.50 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 

BayBank/Middlesex 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

1,000 Fed. Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 11 1/2% 10/15/90 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

1,000 So. Pac. Co. 10.35% 7/1/94 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



2,102.97 



i 459.08 



459.08 

988.25 
1,000.00 

990.00 
1,000.00 

986.25 



16,473.58 



1,265.16 



6,473.58 



152 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 

Interest Income from Savings 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 
Interest Income from Securities 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 
Interest Income from John Todd Fund 
Interest applied to amortize bond purchases 
Bonds matured 
Transfer from MMDT 



(2650.95) 
1,303.54 
1,829.88 
3,682.66 
54.38 
9,000.00 
3,000.00 

$16,219.51 



Payments, per order of Trustees: 
Honoraria: 
Steven Cohen 
Horace Boyer 

N.E. Conservatory Alumni Chorus 
Lecture Expenses 
Printing and Postage 
Safe Deposit Box Rent 
Interest on Bond Purchases 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Transfer to MMDT 
Bond Purchase 
Fees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 



1,500.00 

200.00 

500.00 

749.66 

541.86 

7.50 

209.51 

1,303.54 

4,417.87 

6,198.75 

65.25 



$ 15,658.73 
$ 525.57 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 

BayBank/Middlesex 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4.75% 11/15/87 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3.875% 1/1/88 

3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4.375% 8/15/88 

1,000 So. Cal. Edison Co. 4.5% 2/15/90 

3,000 N.E. Power Co. 4.625% 11/1/91 

3,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4% 10/1/95 

2,000 Comm. Edison 8% 8/1/01 

3,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.25% 8/15/92 

3,000 So. Pac. Co. 10.35% 1994 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



525.57 
23,344.19 

956.25 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 
2,970.00 
3,000.00 
1,947.50 
2,958.75 
3,000.00 
3,150.00 

$50,852.26 

18,798.94 
32,053.32 

$50,852.26 



153 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at 6/30/86 



Income Received 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 
Dividends and Interest 
General Appeal 
Jane H. Poor Schol. Fund Int. 

Interest applied to amortize Bond premium 



Payments per order of Trustees 
86 - 87 Grants 
Safe Deposit Box Rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Printing and Mailing Expense 
Transfer to MMDT 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 



7,286.50 

4,592.00 

A56.08 



3,350.00 

7.50 

659.56 

653.26 

17,455.81 



Cash and Investments at June 30, 1987 



BayBank/Middlesex 

MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 

1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

5,000 Ohio Power 5% 1/1/96 

6,000 So. N.E. Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 

160 Shares Exxon 

100 Shares No. Indiana Service Co. 

5,000 Comm. Edison 8% 8/1/01 

10,000 U., S. Treasury 10 1/8% 11/15/94 

10,000 Fed. Home Loan Bank 10.2% 3/25/88 

Treasury 13 3/4% 5/15/92 

Treasury 11.75% 1/15/91 

, Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

Treasury 11.875% 11/15/89 

Treasury 10 1/2% 4/15/90 



Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 
General Fund 



1, 


000 


u. 


s. 


6, 


,000 


u. 


s. 


11,000 u 


. s 


5, 


,000 


u. 


s. 


4, 


000 


u. 


s. 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
9,645.00 
76,186.93 



$ 10,871.35 

12,334.58 

124.08 

i 23,330.01 



22,126.13 
$ 1,203.88 



1,203.88 

24,547.56 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,987.50 

6,000.00 

3,016.85 

2,973.63 

4,868.75 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

6,000.00 

10,181.88 

4,946.88 

4,000.00 

$ 95,726.93 



i 95,726.93 



154 



LIBRARY TRUST FUND 



Cash Balance at 6/30/86 $1,234.50 

Income Received 7/1/86-6/30/87: 

Codman Library Trust Fund $ 75.92 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 

Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 150.60 
Alice Downing Hart & Olive 

Beatrice Floyd Fund 128.58 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 17.94 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 67.50 

George Russell Library Fund 33.42 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 203.09 

George G. Tarbell Fund 284.31 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 1,265.19 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 109.66 

Lincoln Library Fund 95.06 

Bolt Fund 106.02 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 3,412.31 5,949.60 

Rentals - Thiessen 27.00 
Interest Income Applied to amortize Bond 

Purchase Premiums 279.70 

Bonds matured 2,000.00 

Total Received 

Payments 7/1/86 - 6/30/87: 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 

Paid to Librarian from J.H.Pierce Libr. Fnd. 

Purchase of Books, Tapes 

Purchase of Bonds 

Accrued Interest 

Interest Allowed to Accumulate 

Transferred to MMDT 

Cash Balance at 6/30/87 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 

Income on 
Deposit Principal Total 

Cash on Hand: 

General Funds on Deposit $ (718.78) (718.78) 

Cannon Fund 424.92 424.92 

Thiessen Fund .90 500.00 500.90 

DeNormandie Fund (78.83) 290.50 211.67 

Bolt Fund _ JL _ 20.00 20.00 

$ (796.71) 1,235.42 438.71 





* 


9,490.80 


i 7.50 






67.50 






2,500.85 






1,028.50 






37.92 






1,326.30 






4,083.52 


i 


9,052.09 



155 



Income on 
Deposit 



Codman Fund 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 
Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 1,372.12 

Alice Downing Hart & Olive 
Beatrice Floyd Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 1,024.96 

Hugh Anthony Gasklll Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 137.71 

John H Pierce Library Fund 

1,000 So NE Tel 5.75% 1/1/96 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

George Russell Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 33.42 



Principal 



Total 



$ 194.55 $ 1,000.00 % 1,194.55 



1,000.00 



1,000.00 



144.00 



1,000.00 
117.21 



415.74 



2,372.12 



2,024.96 



281.71 



1,000.00 
117.21 



449.16 



Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 203.09 
1,000 Fed Natl Mort 6.4% 12/87 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 1,529.46 
1,000 So N E Tel 5.75% 1/1/96 
1,000 U S Treas 11.5% 10/90 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 10,506.15 
10,000 Duquesne Lt 7% 11/99 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 311.57 
1,000 Fed Natl Mort 6.4% 12/87 



973.75 
956.25 



138.36 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 



75.00 
9,925.00 



273.52 
956.25 



1,176.84 
956.25 



1,667.82 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



10,581.15 
9,925.00 



585.09 
956.25 



Lincoln Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 95.06 
1,000 So NE Tel 5.75% 1/1/96 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 3,907.51 
6,000 U S Treas 10 1/8% 11/94 
12,000 U S Treas 11 7/8% 10/89 
9,000 U S Treas 13 3/4% 5/92 
3,000 U S Treas 10 1/2% 4/90 



1,000.00 



6,000.00 

12,000.00 

9,000.00 

3,000.00 



95.06 
1,000.00 



3,907.51 
6,000.00 
12,000.00 
9,000.00 
3,000.00 



Katherine S. Bolt Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 
1,000 U S Treas 10 1/2 4/90 



TOTALS 



496.88 



19,015.77 



1,000.00 



53,210.50 



496.88 
1,000.00 

72,226.27 



156 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1986 $ 2,855.50 

Income received 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 

Interest on Investments $ 9,166.00 

Interest on Savings 2,583.34 

Elsie Pierce Trust 4,443.11 

Bonds Matured Va. El. & Power 1,000.00 

Use of Pierce House 56,830.00 

Transfer from MMDT 8,300.00 82,886.45 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 5.63 



TOTAL RECEIPTS 




$ 85,183.58 


Payments per order of the Selectmen: 






60+ Health Clinic 




1,002.25 


C0A Grant 




1,500.00 


Pierce House Expenses: 






Supplies and Furnishings 


4,203.41 




Repairs and Maintenance 


3,163.94 




Manager Compensation 


10,129.57 




Gas (Heating) 


2,665.60 




Other Utilities 


3,316.68 


23,479.20 


Mowing Pierce Park grounds 




3,040.73 


Rubbish Removal 




2,123.60 


Major Expenditures 




7,590.67 


Return of Deposits 




17,100.00 


Bonds Purchased 




1,091.42 


Box Rent 




37.50 


Interest allowed to accumulate 




2,522.31 


Transfer to MMDT 




14,000.00 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 



$ 73,487.68 
i 11,695.90 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 



Unrestricted as to Principal and Interest 



BayBank/Middlesex 

MMDT 

4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 

5,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 

2,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 

5,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.25% 8/15/92 



11,695.90 
50,781.87 
3,825.00 
5,000.00 
1,980.00 
4,875.00 
4,931.25 
3,000.00 



$ 86,089.02 



157 



Restricted as to Principal 

Union Warren Savings Bank 1,087.30 

21,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.402 12/11/87 20,081.25 

10,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 9,900.00 

10,000 U. S. Treasury 7. 25% 8/15/92 9,937.50 

10,000 So. Cal. Edison Co. 7 1/8% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

5,000 Southern N.E. Tel. Co. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

10,000 Florida Power & Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

10,000 Southwestern Bell Tel. 8 1/4% 3/1/14 9,503.50 

10,000 ATT 4 3/4% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4 5/8% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

Restricted Total $ 115,484.55 

Unrestricted Total 86,089.02 

$ 210,573.57 

CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 

Cash Balance at July 1, 1986 \ 350.42 

Receipts: 

Contributions 550.00 

Interest Income 728.75 

Interest applied to amortize bond 6.25 1,285.00 

$ 1,635.42 

Payments: 

Transfer to MMDT 1,267.53 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $ 367.89 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 

BayBank 367.89 

MMDT 1,284.23 

Principal 1,003.30 

10,000 Fed. Nat'l Mortgage 7.35% 4/10/90 10,000.00 ill, 652. 03 



158 



DECORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 $ (10.00) 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 1,901.60 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 9.65 

Bond matured - Idaho Power 1,000.00 2,910.65 

3 2,901.65 

Deduct: 

Safe Deposit Rental 7.50 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 1,142.39 

Bond Purchase - So. Pac. Co. 1,050.00 

Cost of Purchase 41.41 

Transfer to MMDT 650.30 2,891.60 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $ 9.65 

Cash and Securities at June 30, 1987 

BayBank/Middlesex 9.65 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 1,943.57 

2,000 Federal Natl 1 Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

1,000 Pac. Tel. & Tel. Co. 4.375% 8/15/88 1,000.00 

2,000 General Tel. Co. 4.125% 3/1/88 2,000.00 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 1,000.00 

1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4.5% 2/10/90 1,000.00 

4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

2,000 So. N.E. Tel. 5.75% 11/1/96 2,000.00 

1,000 ATT 8.625% 2/1/07 978.75 

1,000 Comm. Edison Co. 8% 8/1/01 973.75 

2,000 U.S. Treasury 12.625% 5/15/95 1,962.50 

3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 2,925.00 

3,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 3,000.00 

1,000 So. Pacific Co. 10.35% 7/1/94 1,050.00 

$ 25,715.72 



159 



JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 

Balance at June 30, 1986 $ .00 

Interest 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 
Interest applied to amortize bonds 



3,883.96 




402.65 


4,286.61 




i 4,286.61 


3,802.35 




81.61 


3,884.96 




i 402.65 



Paid to Bemis Fund u/w John Todd 
Interest allowed to accumulate 

Balance at June 30, 1987 

Investments at June 30, 1987 

BayBank/Middlesex 402.65 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 772.35 

14,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 13,825.00 

15,000 Federal Farm Credit Bank 15,000.00 $30,000.00 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 

Balance at June 30, 1986 $ 2,123.40 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 236.00 

Balance at June 30, 1987 t 2,359.40 

Accumulated Income - West Newton Savings Bank 1,359.40 

Principal 1,000.00 



$ 2,359.40 



160 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 $ 0.00 

Interest Income received 7/1/86-6/30/87 97.55 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 25.56 

$ 123.11 

Less Payments: 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 18.11 

Transfer to MMDT 79.44 97.55 

Cash Balance at 6/30/87 $ 25.56 

Bank Deposits at June 30, 1987 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 359.23 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 10 1/2% 4/15/90 1,000.00 

$1,359.23 

Accumulated Income 141.96 

Principal 1,217.27 

$1,359.23 

JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 $ 0.00 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 26.59 

Interest on Term Deposit 228.18 



Deduct: 



Bank Deposits at June 30, 1987 



$ 254.77 



Bank Interest allowed to accumulate 26.59 

Paid to Lincoln Scholarship Fund 228.18 



$ 254.77 



MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 437.24 

Concord Cooperative Bank Term Certificate 2,700.00 

$3,137.24 

Accumulated Income 1,902.24 

Principal 1,235.00 

$3,137.24 



161 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 



Interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash Balance at 6/30/87 

Cash and Investments at 6/30/87 
MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 
TOTAL 



t 0.00 
42.83 

i 42.83 

42.83 

t 0.00 

j 704.71 
i 704.71 



LAWRENCE W. GREEN FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1986 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 



Tranfer to MMDT 

Interest allowed to accumulate 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 

Cash and Investments at 6/30/87 

BayBank 

MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 



Principal 
Accumulated Interest 



20.00 

110.63 

25.56 

156.19 

75.00 
31.19 

i 106.19 

50.00 



50.00 
587.95 



$ 1,794.14 

1,307.65 
486.49 

$ 1,794.14 



162 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at 6/30/86 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 



Interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash Balance at 6/30/87 

Cash and Investments at 6/30/87 
MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 



$ 0.00 
52.21 

$ 52.21 

52.21 

i o.oo 

859.05 
$ 859.05 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at 6/30/86 

Interest Income 7/1/86 - 6/30/87 



Transfer to MMDT 

Interest allowed to accumulate 



Cash Balance at 6/30/87 

Cash and Investments at 6/30/87 

BayBank 

MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 11 1/2% 10/15/90 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



$ 290.64 
160.84 

$ 451.48 

326.71 
45.84 

$ 372.55 

$ 78.93 



78.93 

988.25 

1,000.00 

$2,067.18 

842.13 
1,225.05 

$2,067.18 



163 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Abbott, John & Diana t 379,500 $ 3,445.86 

Abbott, Margaret & Walter 257,700 2,339.92 

Abedian, Behrouz 307,500 2,792.10 

Abele, Bradford & Rosemary 497,200 4,514.58 

Abrashkin, Diana 190,100 1,726.11 

Achtmeyer, William & Candace 322,200 2,925.58 

Ackley, Wallace & Ethel 1,300 11.80 

Adams, F. Douglas & Patricia 392,000 3,559.36 

Adams, George & Velda 397,700 3,611.12 

Adams, John Quincy & Lucy 684,400 6,214.35 

Adams, John/Pat/Peter/Sharon 795,600 7,224.05 

Adams, Lemire & Donaldson 426,300 3,870.81 

Adams, Ramelle 1,447,000 13,138.76 

Adamson, William & Barbara 378,400 3,435.87 

Adelstein, Mary & James 184,600 1,676.17 

Adkins, Robert & Alison 356,800 3,239.74 

Adler, Bruce 157,200 1,427.38 

Adler, Harold & Ivy 610.000 5,538.80 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 20,700 187.96 

Ahern, Mary Jo/Seronde, Pierre 420,300 3,816.32 

Alam, Mahbub-ul & Momtaz 558,300 5,069.36 

Alam, Umme Salma Momtaz 189,300 1,718.84 

Alfieris, Michael 228,100 2,071.15 

Algeo, Leo & Elaine 269,800 2,449.78 

Allen II, Edwin 502,600 4,563.61 

Allen, Richard & Petronella 232,300 2,109.28 

Allen, Robert & Carol 328,500 2,982.78 

Allen, Rosamond 278,300 2,526.96 

Allen, Ruth 682,500 6,197.10 

Allen, Stephen 245,300 2,227.32 

Allison, Caroline 279,000 2,533.32 

Allison, G. & L./Burk, G. & R 355,600 3,228.85 

Allison, John & Marion 271,200 2,462.50 

Althausen, Alex & Emily 534,700 4,855.08 

Ames III, Adelbert & Mary 498,900 4,530.01 

Ames, James & Suzannah 565,200 5,132.02 

Ammen, David & Judith 682,400 6,196.19 

Amoruso, Renee 222,200 2,017.58 

Anderson, Carl 339,600 3,083.57 

Anderson, David & Elaine 277,800 2,522.42 

Anderson, Lawrence & Rosina 403,500 3,663.78 

Anderson, Mildred 263,900 2,396.21 

Andrew, Francis & Dorothy 713,400 6,477.67 

Angell, Craig & Carolyn 491,100 4,459.19 

Appleyard, Norman & Lillian 278,300 2,526.96 

Aprille, Thomas & Amelia 139,100 1,263.03 

Apsler, Robert & Jacquelin 156,000 1,416.48 

Arista, Miguel 252,200 2,289.98 

Armstrong, C. Robert 430,800 3,911.66 



164 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Armstrong, Joanne $ 718,900 $ 6,527.61 

Arnold, Warren & Barbara 422,900 3,839.93 

Aronson, Richard & Jane 523,800 4,756.10 

Arshad, Gulrez & Sara 649,000 5,892.92 

Art, Robert & Suzanne 250,200 2,271.82 

Arthur J & Young C 553,000 5,021.24 

Asadorian, Alan & Melanie 322,300 2,926.48 

Asaff, Annis & Patricia 419,600 3,809.97 

Atchley Jr, Dana & Barbara 524,900 4,766.09 

Atkins, John & Jamie 255,000 2,315.40 

Atlas, S. & Uilkerson R 378,900 3,440.41 

Austin, Richard & Marcia 465,900 4,230.37 

Avery, Abigail 377,100 3,424.07 

Ayer, J Bruce & Marilyn 228,100 2,071.15 

Azrak, Joseph 991,800 9,005.54 



B H N Realty Trust 1,300 11.80 

Bachrach Jr, Alan 375,000 3,405.00 

Bacon, Horatio & Anne 260,200 2,362.62 

Baggs, Arthur & Marion 385,500 3,500.34 

Baher, Cambiz & Constance 758,900 6,890.81 

Baird, Gordon & Sarah 610,300 5,541.52 

Baldwin, Jacqueline 228,900 2,078.41 

Baldwin, Roger & Mary 393,800 3,575.70 

Balogh, Karoly & Judith 469,300 4,261.24 

Banks, Jamie & Mark 324,200 2,943.74 

Barbarow, Ruth 112,100 1,017.87 

Bardsley, Theodore & Doris 230,500 2,092.94 

Bare, Bruce & Helen 383,200 3,479.46 

Barkas, Christopher & Mary 245,300 2,227.32 

Barmakian, Frank & Norma 262,700 2,385.32 

Barnaby, John & Charlotte 252,700 2,294.52 

Barnes, Benjamin & Ann 413,000 3,750.04 

Barnet, James 507,400 4,607.19 

Barrett, Beatrice 533,100 4,840.55 

Barry, Jon & Barbara 484,900 4,402.89 

Bartovics, William & Susan 333,400 3,027.27 

Basile, Patrick & Judith 349,600 3,174.37 

Basmajian, Vasken & Shohig 346,500 3,146.22 

Bassett, Kenneth 336,900 3,059.05 

Beal Jr., Thomas & Barbara 709,700 6,444.08 

Beal, Bruce & Enid 628,500 5,706.78 

Beenhower, Owen & Lillemor 387,700 3,520.32 

Belanger, Michael & Gisa 183,800 1,668.90 

Bell, Roger & Barbara W. 287,900 2,614.13 

Belle, Gene & Irene 363,600 3,301.49 

Bemis Ann 262,500 2,383.50 

Bennan, William & Eleanor 266,400 2,418.91 



165 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Bennett, Doris 
Benson, John & Kathryn A. 
Benson, Peter & Ann 
Bentley Barbara 
Bentley, Robert 
Bentley, Robert & Joyce 
Benton, Stephen & Jeanne 
Bergen, Kenneth & Emily 
Bergen, Kenneth Dana 
Berger, Ralph & Carol 
Berkenkamp, Anne & John 
Berman, Diane/Donald Cohen 
Bernard, Clark & Susana 
Bibring, Ceorge & Marcia 
Bickford, Helen & Scott 
Biel, Fredrick & Carolyn 
Bienfang, Don & Denise 
Bikales, Norman & Ann 
Billings, Bruce 
Billings, Despena & Thomas 
Billings, Sarah 
Birkett, James & Sarah 
Birmingham, James & Carolyn 
Bishop, Robert & Sarah 
Bjork, Elizabeth 
Black, Stanley 
Black, Thomas 
Black. Jerry & Eva 
Blacker, Lawrence 
Blanchard, Eileen 
Blood, David & Iva Dane 
Bloom, Elaine & Laurence 
Bobbitt, Lake & Sarah 
Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 
Bockoven, John & Dorothy 
Bogner, Walter 
Bohlen, Jack & Alice 
Bolt, Richard & Katherine 
Bolton, Warren & Doris 
Bombara, John & Maria 
Bond, Roger & Elizabeth 
Booth, Alice 
Booth, Robert 
Boquist, Wallace 
Boshco, Margaret 
Boston Edison Co. 
Boston Higashi School 
Boudris, Edward & Mary M. 
Bovey, Martin & Eleanor 



288,600 


$ 2,620.49 


272,200 


2,471.58 


256,400 


2,328.11 


109,300 


992.44 


222,300 


2,018.48 


443,100 


4,023.35 


317,700 


2,884.72 


738,700 


6,707.39 


180,700 


1,640.76 


350,700 


3,184.36 


647,700 


6,881.12 


335,900 


3,049.97 


548,500 


4,980.38 


250,700 


2,276.36 


424,300 


3,852.64 


571,100 


5,185.59 


350,500 


3,182.54 


624,700 


5,672.28 


116,300 


1,056.00 


368,200 


3,343.26 


101,100 


917.99 


215,300 


1,954.92 


452,600 


4,109.61 


374,800 


3,403.18 


381,700 


3,465.84 


163,900 


1,488.21 


166,100 


1,508.19 


304,300 


2,763.04 


350,300 


3,180.72 


218,900 


1,987.61 


230,800 


2,095.66 


328,300 


2,980.96 


283,300 


2,572.36 


44,500 


404.06 


291,400 


2,645.91 


407,300 


3,698.28 


393,000 


3,568.44 


589,400 


5,351.75 


30,900 


280.57 


282,900 


2,568.73 


262,300 


2,381.68 


42,000 


381.36 


621,800 


5,645.94 


833,200 


7,565.45 


283,300 


3,480.36 


154,400 


1,401.95 


418,900 


12,883.62 


489,900 


4,448.29 


292,900 


2,659.53 



166 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estat< 
Real Estate Tax 



Bower, Joseph & Nancy $ 567,400 $ 5,151.99 

Bowers, Spotswood 246,500 2,238.22 

Bowles, Clifford 432,000 3,922.56 

Boyce, Manley 186,500 1,693.42 

Boyce, Manley & Karen 355,300 3,226.12 

Boyer, John 383,400 3,481.27 

Boyer, Markley & Julie 721,200 6,548.50 

Boynton, Daniel & Janet 204,100 1,853.23 

Braasch, John & Nancy 554,100 5,031.23 

Braden, John & Dianne 530,000 4,812.40 

Bradford, Robert & Muriel 237,500 2,156.50 

Bradlee III, Henry & Sandra 429,100 3,896.23 

Bradlee, Benjamin & Martha 527,500 4,789.70 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeannette 189,000 1,716.12 

Brady, Robert & Martha S 289,100 2,625.03 

Brain, J. Walter & Patricia 195,600 1,776.05 

Brandt, John & Marilyn 441,100 4,005.19 

Brannen, Robert & Barbara 578,900 5,256.41 

Braude, Stephen 613,500 5,570.58 

Braun, Morton & Esther 418,200 3,797.26 

Bray, Thomas & Linda Micu 321,600 2,920.13 

Briggs, David & Elaine 454,600 4,127.77 

Briggs, Randall & Mary 387,300 3,516.68 

Briggs, Ronald & Pauline 285,200 2,589.62 

Bright, Richard & Patricia 382,600 3,474.01 

Brisson, Evelyn & Norman 318,900 2,895.61 

Broderick, Ronald & Elizabeth 3,200 29.06 

Brodney, Lawrence & Myra 497,200 4,514.58 

Brogna, Gerald & Mary 626,400 5,687.71 

Bronson, Franklin & Catherine 290,300 2,635.92 

Brooks, Paul 524,000 4,757.92 

Brooks, Rodney & Phanwadee 336,400 3,054.51 

Brower Tr., Howard 609,000 5,529.72 

Brown, Deaver 601,700 5,463.44 

Brown, Elizabeth 654,200 5,940.14 

Brown, Herbert & Theresa 355,400 3,227.03 

Brown, Robert & Jeane 252,600 2,293.61 

Brown, Robert G & Donna 253,800 2,304.50 

Brown, Robert W & Lee 202,400 1,837.79 

Brown, Stephen & Susan 534,800 4,855.97 

Browne, Giles & Lorraine 362,100 3,287.87 

Brubaker, W.L. & Lorraine 293,400 2,664.07 

Brumme, Peter & Marie 495,700 4,500.96 

Bucci, Frank & Arlene 396,400 3,599.31 

Buchan, William & Barbara 272,000 2,469.76 

Buckler, Marilyn 366,400 3,326.91 

Buerger, Martin & Lila 451,700 4,101.44 

Buonopane, Paul & Mary 282,000 2,560.56 

Burckett, Douglas 387,400 3,517.59 



167 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Burk, Ceorge & Ruth $ 327,100 $ 2,970.07 

Burke Jr, Walter & Helen 315,500 2,864.74 

Burke, Ruth Bemis 504,500 4,580.86 

Burke, Thomas & Kathleen 686,500 6,233.42 

Burnes, Justin & Jeannette 304,100 2,761.23 

Burnham, Robert & Elaine 294,000 2,669.52 

Burt, William & Donna 407,300 3,698.28 

Butkus, E & Sweeney, M 349,000 3,168.92 

Butler, William & Nancy 280,400 2,546.03 

Buzney, Sheldon & Jane 959,700 8,714.08 

Bye, Willis & Angela 572,500 5,198.30 

Byrne, Brian & Julie 407,200 3,697.37 

Byrnes, F Michael & Margaret 551,100 5,003.99 

Byron, Alan & Kathryn 214,800 1,950.38 



CTT Associates 152,700 1,386.52 

Cabot, Mary D G 481,800 4,374.74 

Caldwell, Sarah 525,800 4,774.26 

Calitri, Leon & Mary 238,700 2,167.40 

Campobasso, Richard & Lou Ann 279,900 2,541.49 

Cancian, David & Mary 384,900 3,494.89 

Candlewood Trust 2,836,600 25,756.33 

Cannon, Bradford & Ellen 611,400 5,551.52 

Cannon, Robert & Betty 477,900 4,339.33 

Cantlin, Antoinette 392,800 3,566.62 

Cantlin, John & Antoinette 541,500 4,916.82 

Cantu, Robert 584,900 5,310.89 

Capizzi, Michael 252,300 2,290.88 

Cappucci, Thomas & Barbara 329,600 2,992.77 

Caras, Byron & Anastasia 345,700 3,138.96 

Caras, Ophair & Florence 261,300 2,372.60 

Carl Jr, Charles 297,800 2,704.02 

Carley, John & Joan 402,600 3,655.61 

Carlo, Peter & Cheryl 337,900 3,068.13 

Carman, John & Eleanor 634,800 5,763.99 

Carmen, William & Louise 392,100 3,560.27 

Carr, Frederick & Susan 519,700 4,718.87 

Carroll, Brenda/Hosey, John 186,800 1,696.14 

Carroll, Richard 218,500 1,983.98 

Carroll, Richard & Elaine 196,400 1,783.31 

Carter, John 609,500 5,534.26 

270,400 2,455.23 

240,800 2,186.46 

255,400 2,319.03 

436,200 3,960.70 

172,800 1,569.02 

455,000 4,131.40 

714,000 6,483.12 



168 



Caruso, 


Robert 


Sc Abbie 


Carver, 


Jack & 


Donna 


Caskey, 


Anna 




Caskey, 


Walter 




Cassidy 


, Verna 




Caswell 


, John I 


i Carol 


Cavallaro, Peter & Elizabeth 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Cellucci, Daniel & Yolanda $ 163,900 $ 1.488.21 

Cellucci, Elizabeth & Stephen 320,200 2,907.42 

Chaet, Robert & Joyce 234,800 2,131.98 

Chaiken, Jan & Marcia 362,500 3,291.50 

Chaing Tr. , James 250,100 2,270.91 

Chalilpoyil, Purush & Kerstin 254,100 2,307.23 

Champeny, John/ Lisa 360,400 3,272.43 

Champeny, Leona 672,100 6,102.66 

Champion, Craig & Teresa 555,400 5,043.03 

Chan, Catherine 342,900 3,113.53 

Chan, Vincent & Agnes 456,800 4,147.74 

Chang, Mei-Sung & Hung-She 697,300 6,331.48 

Chapin, Bertha 752,500 6,832.70 

Chapin, Margaret 284,100 2,579.63 

Chase, Barbara 180,700 1,640.76 

Chase, Rebecca 779,600 7,078.77 

Chen, Sow-Hsin & Ching-Chih 88,500 803.58 

Cherniack, Jerome & Elizabeth 274,000 2,487.92 

Chien, Kenneth & Patricia 137,700 1,250.32 

Chin, Joseph & Barbara 247,400 2,246.39 

Chiotelis, Charles & Iasme 399,500 3,627.46 

Chipman, Mary 232,100 2,107.47 

Chisholm, Edward & Margaret 258,900 2,350.81 

Chmielinski, Tsun Ming/Robert 227,200 2,062.98 

Chopra, Deepak & Rita 640,400 5,814.83 

Chou, Harry & Lily 445,100 4,041.51 

Christensen, David & Patsy 311,600 2,829.33 

Christensen, Ronald 423,500 3,845.38 

Chu, Chauncy & Margaret 416,800 3,784.54 

Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 487,000 4,421.96 

Chu, Tomoko & Nelson 336,200 3,052.70 

Church, Robert & Priscilla 449,000 4,076.92 

Churchill, Richard & Maria 709,100 6,438.63 

Ciampa, V. /Sullivan, J. 183,100 1,662.55 

Ciampi, Mary 295,000 2,678.60 

Ciaramaglia, Frederick/Marcia 425,200 3,860.82 

Cibel, Stanley & Thelma 254,000 2,306.32 

Ciraso, Anne & Jennie 374,600 3,401.37 

Clark, Clifford & Patricia 435,200 3,951.62 

Clark, Sandra B 352,300 3,198.88 

Clarke, James 282,600 2,566.01 

Coan, Thomas & Catherine 210,800 1,914.06 

Coane, Amolia 175,600 1,594.45 

Coburn, Estate of Edward 459,400 4,171.35 

Coffin, Stewart & Jane 382,200 3,470.38 

Cohen, Jacques 314,200 2,852.94 

Cole, Addison & Ann B 300,900 2,732.17 

Cole, Edwin & Lucy 409,300 3,716.44 

Cole, George & Barbara 472,500 4,290.30 



169 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Cole, Hugh & Anne C t 661,500 t 6,006.42 

Coleman, George & Kathleen 380,400 3,454.03 

Coleman, Mary M 372,700 3,384.12 

Coleman, Susan 1,300 11.80 

Collins, Donald & Susan 448,200 4,069.66 

Collins, Laurence & Janet 332,500 3,019.10 

Collins, Margery P 369,500 3,355.06 

Comjean, Bruce & Marlies 522,700 4,746.12 

Comjean, Marc & Judith 347,600 3,156.21 

Como, Florence 265,400 2,409.83 

Comstock, Charles & Joan 414,200 3,760.94 

Cone Jr, Thomas & Barbara 397,100 3,605.67 

Connolly, Joseph 328,600 2,983.69 

Conrad, Peter & Ylisabyth 390,800 3,548.46 

Constable, William 257,100 2,334.47 

Constantine, Katherine 274,400 2,491.55 

Cook, John & Caroline 375,500 3,409.54 

Cook, Jr, Paul & Marion 498,800 4,529.10 

Coolidge, Henry & Alice 591,600 5,371.73 

Coons, Nancy 414,000 3,759.12 

Cooper, Amiel & Lorna 428,000 3,886.24 

Cooper, E Crawley & Jane 367,600 3,337.81 

Copeland, Charles & Muriel 319,100 2,897.43 

Corcoran, Robert & Elizabeth 412,200 3,742.78 

Cormack, Allan 144,300 1,310.24 

Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy 647,400 5,878.39 

Cotoia, Lucy 353,000 3,205.24 

Cotoni, Arthur & Penelope 321,800 2,921.94 

Cotoni, Joseph 272,200 2,471.58 

Cotton, Michael & Diane 578,000 5,248.24 

Countryside Contemporaries 669,100 6,075.43 

Countryside Estates 377,200 3,424.97 

Courtney, Joseph & Elaine 250,000 2,270.00 

Cousins, Estate of Lawrence 294,800 2,676.78 

Cowles, Addison & Alexandra 265,200 2,408.02 

Craig Jr, Stanley & Susan 479,200 4,351.14 

Craig, Robert & Amy 247,900 2,250.93 

Crandall, Stephen & Patricia 489,400 4,443.75 

Crawford, Hugh 227,600 2,066.61 

Crawford, John & Joanna 436,500 3,963.42 

Creighton, Alexander/Elizabeth 277,300 2,517.88 

Cretella, Henry & Ruth 546,200 4,959.50 

Critch, William & Dorina L. 510,300 4,633.52 

Crook, Constance 213,300 1,936.76 

Crosby, Douglas & Laura 535,000 4,857.80 

Crosby, Gregory & Anne 528,800 4,801.50 

Crowe, Mary 524,300 4,760.64 

Culver, Perry 763,300 6,930.76 

Cummings, William & Palraa 263,100 2,388.95 



170 







VALUATION LIST, 


JULY 1, 1987 














Aggregate 


Value 


Real Estate 








Real Estate 


Tax 




Cunningham, 


J Lewis & Ruth 


$ 318,700 


* 2,893 


80 


Cunningham, 


James 




249 


500 


2,265. 


46 


Cunningham, 


Robert 


& Claire 


235 


,200 


2,135 


62 


Cunningham, 


Robert 


& Margaret 


424 


900 


3,858 


09 


Curtis, Stanley & 


Cody 


289 


,500 


2,628 


66 


Curtiss, Robert & 


Dorothy 


272 


,400 


2,473 


39 



Dacosta, David & Dianna G 843,300 7,657.16 

Dallos, Andras & Zsuzsanna 250,500 2,274.54 

Damico Jr, Ralph & Edwina 212,300 1,927.68 

Damico, Ralph 325,600 2,956.45 

Damico, Ralph & Elvira 442,700 4,019.71 

Damon, J Gilbert & Priscilla 298,800 2,713.10 

Dane, Benjamin & Alexandra 869,800 7,897.78 

Dane, Roger & Lydia 961,100 8,726.79 

Daniels, Bruce & Janet 649,900 5,901.09 

Daniels, Grover & Starr 500,400 4,543.63 

Danna, Mario 190,600 1,730.65 

Danosky, Mary 217,800 1,977.62 

Darling Jr, Eugene 360,800 3,276.06 

Darling, Leonard & Barbara 566,100 5,049.39 

Darman, Richard 278,200 2,526.06 

Darrigo Brothers Co. 159,500 1,448.26 

Dautremont, Chester & Ruth 713,500 6,478.58 

Dautremont, Ruth 394,800 3,584.78 

Davis, Prescott 130,100 1,181.30 

Davis, Ronald & Barbara 288,800 2,622.30 

Davis, Sherman 519,000 4,712.52 

Davis, Sherman & Phyllis 729,700 6,625.68 

Davis, William & May 268,300 2,436.16 

Davy, Louise & Edgar 360,100 3,269.71 

Dawes, Donald & Ruth 352,700 3,202.52 

De La Pena, Miguel & Irma 327,800 2,976.42 

DeNormandie Farms Trust 552,100 5,013.07 

DeNormandie, Alice 668,400 6,069.07 

DeNormandie, Philip 16,900 153.45 

DeNormandie, Philip/Ernestine 20,700 187.96 

DeNormandie, Robert & Eliana 487,100 4,422.87 

DeNormandie, Thomas, K & V 1,109,300 10,072.46 

Dean, Louis 5,300 48.12 

Dean, Robert & Denise 208,700 1,895.00 

Dean, William & Lorraine 291,700 2,648.64 

Debaryshe, Paul & Louise 265,400 2,409.83 

Decisneros, Maria 293,000 2,660.44 

Deck, Mark & Patricia 490,100 4,450.11 

Deguglielmo, Florence 1,300 11.80 

Dejesus, John & Geneva 396,000 3,595.68 

Delia, John & Maria 396,700 3,602.04 



171 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



DelllPrlscoll, Jon M. Tr. $ 333,400 $ 3,027.27 

Delorl, Francois & Rosamond 575,200 5,222.82 

Denehy, Bernadetta 546,300 4,960.40 

Denehy, Edward 247,100 2,243.67 

Denholm, Stuart & Jane 524,700 4,764.27 

Denlson, Mary 487,600 4,427.41 

Derbyshire, Helen 1,300 11.80 

DesCognets, Archer/Gwendolyn 509,200 4,623.54 

Desai, Samir & Nilima 680,400 6,178.03 

Deterling Jr, Ralph & Mary 390,900 3,549.37 

Dewey, Edward & Laurie 640,700 5,817.55 

Dewey, Edward & Zella 375,200 3,406.82 

Dexter, Barbara 469,100 4,259.43 

Diab, Constance & Thomas 761,300 6,912.60 

Diadiuk, Vicky 290,700 2,639.56 

Diarbakerly, Mark & Regina 240,300 2,181.92 

Dickie, Richard & Julia 256,400 2,328.11 

Diebboll, Robert & Kim 225,500 2,047.54 

Dieterich, Richard & Beverly 361,300 3,280.60 

Digiovanni, Guy & Teresa 352,700 3,202.52 

Dilg, Giles 316,500 2,873.82 

Dillman, Douglas & Virginia 255,900 2,323.57 

Dinerstein, Gordon 304,600 2,765.77 

Ditoro, Michael 221,900 2,014.85 

Dixon, Milburn 116,300 1,056.00 

Dixon, Russell & Theresa 299,200 2,716.74 

Doherty's Garage 470,500 4,272.14 

Doherty, James & Ellen 266,800 2,422.54 

Doherty, William & Phyllis 539,900 4,902.29 

Dolan, Charles & Joanne 812,600 7,378.41 

Dolinsky, Larry & Joan 221,900 2,014.85 

Domenichella Jr, Frank 55,800 506.66 

Domenichella, Domenic 136,400 1,238.52 

Domenichella, Frank/Margaret 249,300 2,263.64 

Donald, Aida 488,300 4,433.76 

Donald, David & Aida 231,300 2,100.20 

Donaldson, Alan 262,700 2,385.32 

Donaldson, Astrid 358,900 3,258.81 

Donaldson, David & Lynn 892,200 8,101.17 

Donaldson, Donald 1,300 11.80 

Donaldson, Elizabeth 1,036,500 9,411.42 

Donaldson, Jonathan & Nancy 409,200 3,715.54 

Donaldson, Magruder/ Jennifer 604,300 5,487.04 

Donaldson, Malcolm 694,500 6,306.06 

Donnell, Marion 428,400 3,889.87 

Donovan, Andrew 458,900 4,166.81 

Donovan, Donna 278,900 2,532.41 

Dooley, Thomas & Helen 693,000 6,292.43 

Doretti, Robert & Carol 1,038,700 9,431.40 



172 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Dorian, Paul & Susan 

Dougherty, Allen & Helen 

Doughty, Joseph 

Downey Jr, Edward /Elizabeth 

Downing, Daniel & Linda L 

Downs, Elaine 

Dowse, Amy 

Drago, Nicholas & Sara 

Drane, Douglas 

Drew, Frederic & Shirley 

Driscoll, Daniel & Constance 

Duane, Neil & Floretta 

Dubin, Steven 

Dubois, Olive 

Duborg, George 

Duffy III, James & Barbara 

Dumais, Richard & Jane C. 

Durso, Muriel 

Dust in, Rachel 

Dyer-Alexander, Cheryl 



Eaton, Jefferson 

Eckhardt, Homer 

Edlund, Campbell 

Egendorf , Andrew & Linda 

Elkus, Howard & Lorna 

Elliott, Peggy 

Ellis Jr, Alexander & Nancy 

Ellis, Eloise 

Ells, Stephen 

Elwood, David & Carol 

Emerson, William & Pamela 

Emery, Alice 

Emmons, Judith 

England, Albert & Priscilla 

Eppling, Frederic & Sarah 

Epstein, Arnold & Patricia 

Ericson, Herbert & Erlyne 

Eschenroeder, Alan & Laura 

Eshleman, Dean 

Etcheverry, Nicholas 

Evangelista, Florenzo/Dorothy 

Evans, Lucius & Cynthia 



Faddoul, George & Natalie 
Fairbanks, Alan & Diane 



366,700 


$ 3,329.64 


204,300 


1,855.04 


213,800 


1,941.30 


266,000 


2,415.28 


244,700 


2.221.88 


355,500 


3,227.94 


440,900 


4,003.37 


413,300 


3,752.76 


797,000 


7,236.76 


187,600 


1,703.41 


488,800 


4,438.30 


334,200 


3,034.54 


326,300 


2,962.80 


227,600 


2,066.61 


390,900 


3,549.37 


802,100 


7,283.07 


229,900 


2,087.49 


246,800 


2,240.94 


316,000 


2,869.28 


581,300 


5,278.20 


238,100 


2,161.95 


320,200 


2,907.42 


304,000 


2,760.32 


830,600 


7,541.85 


432,700 


3,928.92 


542,400 


4,924.99 


740,400 


6,722.83 


561,700 


5,100.24 


172,100 


1,562.67 


295,500 


2,356.26 


404,600 


3,673.77 


358,600 


3,256.09 


448,400 


4,071.47 


574,800 


5,219.19 


249,600 


2,266.37 


461,900 


4,194.05 


350,400 


3,181.63 


480,800 


4,365.66 


197,200 


1,790.58 


485,800 


4,411.06 


209,800 


1,904.98 


769,500 


6,987.06 


294,000 


2,669.52 


1,300 


11.80 



173 



VALUATION LIST, JULY I, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Falender, Andrew 
Faneuil Hall Flower Mkt. 
Faran, James & Ellen 
Fargo, Susan & Foster 
Farny, Michael 
Farny, Michael & Ethel 
Farrell Philip & Ruth 
Farrokh-Pars , ilomayoon 
Felnberg, Nell 
Feldberg, Warren & Rosaiyn 
Feldman, Deborah 
Feleglan, Peter & Marion 
Felix, James 
Fenijn, Chris & Yvonne 
Fenton, Terence & Cynthia 
Fernald Jr, George & Eleanor 
Ferri, Edward & Eleanor 
Ferro, Armand & Jacqueline 
Finnegan, Lawrence 
Finnerty, James & Anna 
Finnerty, Richard & Wendy 
Finney, Ross & Laura 
Finucane, Ann 
Fiorelli, Ernest & Rose 
Fiscale, Joseph, Tr. 
Fisher, John 
Fitts (Todd), Gertrude 
Fitzgerald, Derek & Eleanor 
Fitzgerald, John & Thelma 
Fitzgerald, Michael/Kathleen 
Flannery, Constance 
Flannery, Donald Jr & Mittie 
Flansburgh, Earl & Louise 
Flint Jr. , Warren & Margaret 
Flint Realty Trust 
Flint, Edward & Henry 
Flint, Edward c/o Henry 
Flint, Ephraim 
Flint, Eugenia 
Flint, George & Lucie 
Flint, Jonathan & Alice 
Flint, Margaret S. 
Flint, Peter & Janet 
Flint, Warren & Margaret S 
Flint, Warren F. 
Flynn, William & Therese 
Foley, John 
Ford II, David & Mary 
Fortunato, Frank & Joan 



372,500 


i 3,382.30 


382,100 


V<69.47 


519,100 


4,713.43 


493,200 


4,478.26 


386,100 


3,505.79 


273,700 


2,485.20 


317,600 


2,883.81 


272,900 


2,477.93 


329,000 


2,987.32 


844,100 


7,664.43 


345,600 


3,138.05 


297,500 


2,701.30 


284,500 


2,583.26 


298,200 


2,707.66 


188,000 


1,707.04 


667,700 


6,062.72 


341,600 


3,101.73 


252,200 


2,289.98 


155,800 


1,414.66 


265,200 


2,408.02 


417,400 


3,789.99 


885,900 


8,043.97 


513,300 


4,660.76 


355,900 


3,231.57 


329,800 


2,994.58 


373,900 


3,395.01 


595,100 


5,403.51 


284,400 


2,582.35 


301,500 


2,737.62 


106,100 


10,043.39 


398,100 


3,614.75 


218,600 


1,984.89 


461,400 


4,189.51 


458,300 


4,161.36 


186,000 


1,688.83 


301,200 


2,734.90 


6,300 


57.20 


27,000 


245.16 


298,300 


2,708.56 


276,700 


2,512.44 


357,100 


3,242.47 


328,100 


2,979.15 


278,700 


2,530.60 


3,100 


28.15 


3,500 


31.78 


311,400 


2,827.51 


252,800 


2,295.42 


625,700 


5,681.36 


229,900 


2,087.49 



174 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Foster, Gerald & Candace 
Foster, J Edward & Sara 
Francis, Henry & Phoebe 
Frank, Robert & Velma 
Fraser, Donald & Joanne 
Fraser, Robert & Donna 
Frazier, Michael & Janet 
Freda, Warren & Priscilla 
Freed, Charles & Florence 
French, John & Deborah 
Friedman / Cohen 
Frost, Wesley & October 
Funaro, Enrico & Cathcrin 
Fung, Margaret 
Fusillo, Concetta 



Gable, Bruce & Dawn 

Gabovitch, Annette 

Galley, Timothy & Mary 

Gallitano, Leo & Alphonse 

Gannett, Ann 

Gardent Jr, Paul & Harriet 

Gargill, Lynn 

Gargill, Robert 

Garmory, Bertha 

Garner, Robert & Kathleen 

Garrett, Prichard & Tracy 

Garrison, David & Alice 

Garrison, John 

Garside, Alice 

Garth, John & Nancy 

Gary, Maida 

Gatchell Jr, G Gordon/Esther 

Gauvin, Gregory & Mary 

Gavrin, Edward 

Gechijian, Ara & Nancy 

Gechter, Jerry & Anne 

Geer, Charles 

Gentile, Joseph & Kathleen 

Gerson, Nathaniel & Sareen 

Gerson, Orin 

Gertz, Dwight & Virginia 

Gervais, Maurice & Francoise 

Gheith, Dorothy 

Glese, Paul & Lucretia 

Gilfoy, Donald & Helen 

Cillis, John & Marsha 

Gilman, B. /Carter, L. 



$ 336,000 


$ 3,050.88 


368,100 


3,342.35 


280,400 


2,546.03 


572,200 


5,195.58 


474,400 


4,307.55 


268,600 


2,438.89 


174,900 


1,588.09 


19,400 


176.15 


412,700 


3,747.32 


594,700 


5,399.88 


803,400 


7,294.87 


265,600 


2,411.65 


528,100 


4,795.15 


105,300 


956.12 


497,400 


4,516.39 


304,000 


2,760.32 


321,500 


2,919.22 


333,700 


3,030.00 


425,000 


3,859.00 


631,900 


5,737.65 


279,700 


2,539.68 


274,200 


2,489.74 


1,020,500 


9,266.14 


201,700 


1,831.44 


269,700 


2,448.88 


471,100 


4,277.59 


341,100 


3,097.19 


503,200 


4,569.06 


247,500 


2,247.30 


278,700 


2,530.60 


302,800 


2,749.42 


253,900 


2,305.41 


298,600 


2,711.29 


417,700 


3,792.72 


4,800 


43.58 


180,700 


1,640.76 


812,300 


7,375.68 


243,400 


2,210.07 


342,300 


3,108.08 


17 4,300 


] ,582.64 


369,000 


3,350.52 


269,000 


2,442.52 


228,600 


2,075.69 


328,700 


2,984.60 


325,600 


2,956.45 


492,500 


4,471.90 


194,400 


] ,765.15 



175 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Giurleo, James & Mary 
Glass, John & Florence 
Gleason, Nancy 
Glendon, Richard & Diana 
Goddard, Richard & Karen 
Goldbaum, Michael & Wanda 
Golden, Sylvia 
Goldlust, Jerry 
Goldstein, Joel 
Coodrich, John & Susan 
Goodspeed, Jacqueline 
Gordon, A./Gilman, T. 
Gordon, Doris 
Gordon, Lester & Dafna 
Gounaris, Thomas & Jean 
Grabill, Martha 
Graddis, Richard 
Graf, Jeannette 
Graham, Jack & Norma 
Grande, Orlando & Rose 
Gras, Ranulf & Annette 
Grason, Rufus & Edna 
Gray, Leslie & Jessie 
Gray, Patricia & Stephen 
Greaves, Allan & Theresa 
Greeley, James & Bernice 
Green, Laurence & Margot 
Green, Robert T. & Catherine 
Green, Robert V. & Therese 
Greenberg, David 
Greenberg, Sandra 
Greenberger, Joel & Catherine 
Greeson, Joseph & Jennie 
Griggs, Annette & Thomas 
Grim Jr., William & Barbara 
Grinnell, Virginia 
Grinnen, Lewis 
Gross, Thomas & Judith 
Grover C. Stuart & Gunilda 
Groves, Allan & Camille 
Guarino, Guy & Frances 
Guiness, Laurence & Lois 
Guldberg, Peter & Alexandra 
Gummere, J./Hersey, R. 
Gurley, Elizabeth 
Gustafson, J Kenneth & Janet 
Gustavson, Glenn & Patricia M 
Guthke, Karl & Dagmar 
Guy, Cynthia 



30,400 


$ 276.03 


301,800 


2,740.34 


452,300 


4,106.88 


256,100 


2,325.39 


211,900 


1,924.05 


391,400 


3,553.91 


367,800 


3,339.62 


216,300 


1,964.00 


229,900 


2,087.49 


427,200 


3,878.98 


275,100 


2,497.91 


272,300 


2,472.48 


613,000 


5,566.04 


327,400 


2,972.79 


278,200 


2,526.06 


238,000 


2,161.04 


7,300 


66.28 


225,700 


2,049.36 


523,900 


4,757.01 


433,600 


3,937.09 


349,400 


3,172.55 


333,000 


3,023.64 


442,000 


4,013.36 


590,300 


5,359.92 


256,000 


2,324.48 


331,900 


3,013.65 


307,800 


2,794.82 


589,600 


5,353.57 


241,900 


2,196.45 


233,500 


2,120.18 


316,900 


2,877.45 


652,600 


5,925.61 


630,500 


5,724.94 


438,700 


3,983.40 


274,600 


2,493.37 


335,600 


3,047.25 


570,400 


5,179.23 


316,500 


2,873.82 


346,700 


3,148.04 


312,300 


2,835.68 


535,100 


4,858.71 


543,400 


4,934.07 


611,400 


5,551.51 


368,200 


3,343.26 


290,400 


2,636.83 


280,000 


2,542.40 


382,000 


3,468.56 


367,000 


3,332.36 


445,900 


4,048.77 



176 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Guzinowicz, Mary & John 
Gyftopoulos, Ellas & Artemis 



H. B. Knowles, Inc. 
Haartz, Beatrice 
Haber, Stuart & Ellen 
Hachikian, Kenneth & Gloria 
Hadley, Henry & Janna 
Hadlock, Charles & Joanne 
Haessler, Herbert & Diane 
Haggerty, John & Mary Jo 
Haggerty, Nancy 
Hagmann, Otto & {Catherine 
Hales, Charles & Mary Ann 
Hall III, Andrew 
Hall, Nancy 

Halpern, Nicholas & Betsey 
Hamilton, William H & Esther 
Hamilton, William L 
Hammond III, John & Nancy 
Hanania, Barbara 
Hansen, C Russel & Pamela 
Hansen, Kent 

Hanson, Adler & Madeline 
Hapgood Jr, Norman & Ruth 
Harding, Douglas & Susan 
Harding, Sheila 
Harney, Gregory & Anne 
Haroian, Henry & Jessie 
Haroutunian, Harry & Anita 
Harrington Jr., Clifford 
Harrington, A./Tanden, P. 
Harrington, Nancy Forg 
Harrington, W./Tanden, T. 
Harrington, Winthrop 
Harris, Eric 
Harris, Melvyn & Nancy 
Harris, Roger & Evelyn 
Harrison, E. /Phillips, D. 
Harrison, Henry & Elizabeth 
Harvey, Frank & Adele 
Hatsopoulos, George & Daphne 
Hatsopoulos, John & Patricia 
Haughey McCann, Sylvia 
Hawes, Donald & Lillian 
Hawkes, Gregory & Elaine 
Haworth, George 
Hay, Pamela & Richard 



$ 271,000 


$ 2,460.68 


742,300 


6,740.08 


621,500 


5,643.22 


420,400 


3,817.23 


426,900 


3,876.25 


513,800 


4,665.30 


464,200 


4,214.94 


417,000 


3,786.36 


471,700 


4,283.04 


445,600 


4,046.05 


220,900 


2,005.77 


453,200 


4,115.06 


517,100 


4,695.27 


485,100 


4,404.71 


221,300 


2,009.40 


414,300 


3,761.84 


367,100 


3,333.27 


284,300 


2,581.44 


538,900 


4,893.21 


205,100 


1,862.31 


805,900 


7,317.57 


646,100 


5,866.59 


353,000 


3,205.24 


450,200 


4,087.82 


335,500 


3,046.34 


172,200 


1,563.58 


501,300 


4,551.80 


296,500 


2,692.22 


165,600 


1,503.65 


36,900 


335.05 


89,500 


812.66 


14,500 


131.66 


252,600 


2,293.61 


998,000 


9,061.84 


409,800 


3,720.98 


442,700 


4,019.72 


203,900 


1,851.41 


384,900 


3,494.89 


910,400 


8,266.43 


545,600 


4,954.05 


828,600 


7,523.69 


762,700 


6,925.32 


410,500 


3,727.34 


349,600 


3,174.37 


596,400 


5,415.31 


264,000 


2,397.12 


443,000 


4,022.44 



177 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Haydock, Gale/Freeman, Mason $ 420,900 t 3,821.77 

Hayes, Oliver & Paula 263,800 2,395.30 

Hayes, Wilson & Dana 405,200 3,679.22 

Hays, Timothy & Pamela 352,800 3,203.42 

Healey Jr, Harry & Jeanne 371,300 3,371.40 

Healthcare Property Investor 1,300 11.80 

Healy, Edward & Helen 330,800 3,003.66 

Heart, Frank & Jane 349,100 3,169.83 

Hecht, Norman & Mary 372,300 3,380.48 

Heck, Stanley & Mary 1,018,900 9,251.62 

Heghinian, Aram Tr. 303,800 2,758.50 

Heijn Jr, Cornelius & Marion 253,600 2,302.69 

Heinrich, Paul 316,500 2,873.82 

Helllmuth, Joseph & Regina 336,300 3,053.60 

Henderson, Robert 14,400 130.75 

Henderson, Robert & Carolyn 306,800 2,785.74 

Henderson, Ronald & Priscilla 324,900 2,950.09 

Hendrick, James 292,500 2,655.90 

Hendrickson, Robert & Ruth 226,100 2,052.99 

Hensley, Kevin & Melissa 221,300 2,009.40 

Herlacher, Larry & Jane 561,900 5,102.05 

Herlin, Melvin & Eugenia 399,000 3,622.92 

Herman, Peter & Mary 197,400 1,792.39 

Herrmann, Carl 120,900 1,097.77 

Herron, Robert & Dinny 455,400 4,135.03 

Hersch, Charles & Phyllis 321,300 2,917.40 

Herschbach, Dudley & Ceorgene 360,000 3,268.80 

Herthel, Evelyn 515,000 4,676.20 

Hester, Leon 414,000 3,759.12 

Hewitt, Elizabeth & George 396,300 3,598.40 

Hibben, George 525,900 4,775.17 

Hicks, Robert & Sarah 160,600 1,458.25 

Hieronymus, William & Ramelle 474,900 4,312.09 

Hill, Craig & Heather 491,100 4,459.19 

Hinds, Edward 658,500 5,979.18 

Hingston, Joseph & Gloria 263,000 2,388.04 

Hoar, Norman & Shirley 323,800 2,940.10 

Hoben, Allan & Susan 298,900 2,714.01 

Hoch, Alfred 209,700 1,904.08 

Hoch, Reimar 230,100 2,089.30 

Hodgson, Nicholas & Melissa 831,100 7,546.39 

Hoff, Charles & Josephine 699,700 6,353.28 

Holden, Sarah 893,800 8,115.70 

Holden, Sarah & Lawrence 192,300 1,746.08 

Holland, Peter & Marjorie 282,200 2,562.38 

Holland, Taffy 430,700 3,910.76 

Hollingsworth, Florence 487,400 4,425.59 

Hollister, Walter & Sally 346,100 3,142.59 

Hoover, Henry & Lucretia 383,300 3,480.36 



178 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Hopengarten, Fredric & Betty $ 277,600 $ 2,520.61 

Hopkins, Mark 396,200 3,597.50 

Hopkins, Robert & Mary 340,000 3,087.20 

Home, Benjamin & Jean 463,900 4,212.22 

Horwitz, Murray & Patricia 398,900 3,622.01 

Houghton, Lillian 125,700 1,141.36 

Housman, Frank & Ruth 591,700 5,372.64 

Houtzell, Stephanie 291,200 2,644.10 

Howard, Joseph & Sally 447,300 4,061.48 

Hsu, Cheng-Pei & Maggie 240,400 2,182.83 

Hsu, Michael & Dora 559,600 5,081.17 

Hubbard, Eliot 510,600 4,636.25 

Hull, Kenneth & Sandra 258,900 2,350.81 

Humez, Alice D. 835,000 7,581.79 

Hunsaker Land Corp. Inc 27,500 249.70 

Hunsaker, Jerome 756,500 6,869.02 

Hunt, Daniel & Joan 817,100 7,419.27 

Hunter, William & Suzanne 318,600 2,892.89 

Hurd, Kenneth E. 526,200 4,777.90 

Hurff, Joseph & Elizabeth 320,600 2,911.05 

Hyde, Benjamin & Mildred 413,000 3,750.04 

Hyman, William & Aida F. 291,800 2,649.54 



Ide, Kenton & Christel 292,100 2,652.27 

Iliescu, Nicholas & Esther 353,700 3,211.60 

Immel, Stephen & Peggy 370,600 3,365.05 

Ingard, K Uno & Doris 408,600 3,710.09 

Inglis, John & Elizabeth 508,200 4,614.46 

Ireland, David & Diana 671,500 6,097.22 

Irwin, Mary 538,700 4,891.40 

Ives, Katherine C. 547,200 4,968.58 

Ivy Realty Trust 1,176,900 10,686.25 



J & M Realty Trust 175,100 1,589.91 

Jackson, Gardner & Sallie 326,300 2,962.80 

Jackson, Huson & Polly 550,200 4,995.82 

Jacobs, David & Louise 433,600 3,937.09 

Jacobson, John & Marion 757,600 6,879.01 

James, Hamilton & Waleska 585,200 5,313.62 

Janes, G. Sargent & Ann 331,400 3,009.11 

Jarvis, John & Elaine 393,000 3,568.44 

Jeffrey, Joseph & Louise 269,400 2,446.15 

Jenal, Robert & Irene 523,600 4,754.29 

Jennings, Charles & Ann 245,300 2,227.32 

Jerodel Realty Trust 860,800 7,816.07 

Jevon, Robert & Virginia 315,800 2,867.46 

Jewett, Eleanor 507,000 4,603.56 



179 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Jewett, Julie D 
Joannopoulos, John & Sandra 
John, DeWitt & Morley 
Johnson, Ernest 
Johnson, Ernest & Grace 
Johnson, H.W. & Jeannine 
Johnson, Kenneth & Gladys 
Johnson, Kimmond & Anne 
Johnson, Richard & Donna 
Johnson, Rollin & Hilary 
Johnston, Carolyn 
Joshuas Way Realty Trust 



i 468,500 
551,200 
534,800 
243,900 
399,400 
527,100 
352,300 
203,800 
899,700 
309,500 
301,900 
783,300 



4,253.98 
5,004.90 
4,855.98 
2,214.61 
3,626.55 
4,786.07 
3,198.88 
1,850.50 
8,169.27 
2,810.26 
2,741.25 
7,112.36 



Kahn, Martin & Susan 
Kalaidjian, W G & Wray, E. 
Kalajian, Michael & Seta 
Kalba, Konrad & Patricia 
Kameny, Stuart & Wendy 
Kanarek, Stephen & Roberta 
Kano, Cyrus & Dorothy 
Kao, Peter & Mei-Lin 
Karassik, Peter & Nancy 
Karp, Lori & Ethel 
Kasperian, Karl & Carol 
Kass, Edward & Amalie 
Kassner, Michael 
Katz, Saul & Dorothy 
Kaufman, Marcla 
Kaye, Harold & Alice 
Kaylor, Richard & Nancy 
Keay, Donald & Mary Ann 
Keevil, Charles & Hannah 
Keily, Gertrude 
Kelleher, Robert & Katherine 
Keller, John & Lanna 
Kelley, Andrew & Irene 
Kellner-Rogers, Joan 
Kelly, Thomas & Mary 
Kendrick, Marvin & Kathleen 
Kennard, Henrietta 
Kennedy Land Corp. 
Kennedy, Albert & Carolyn 
Kennedy, Albert E. 
Kennedy, John P & Sylvia 
Kennedy, John T. 
Kern, Edward & Priscilla 
Kerrebrock, Jack & Bernice 
Kessel, Joseph & Lesley 



454,500 
317,200 
459,000 
376,700 
472,400 
293,200 
311,400 
531,800 

40,800 
221.300 
594,800 
873,200 
317,400 
321,500 
378,200 
276,800 
484,100 
350,000 
410,400 
223,100 
391,800 
196,400 
311,600 
222,000 
316,800 
1,300 
389,900 

47,700 
318,400 

16,100 
457,900 
502,200 
401,900 
428,900 
317,200 



4,126.86 
2,880.18 
4,167.72 
3,420.44 
4,289.39 
2,662.26 
2,827.51 
4,828.74 

370.46 
2,009.40 
5,400.78 
7,928.66 
2,881.99 
2,919.22 
3,434.06 
2,513.34 
4,395.63 
3,178.00 
3,726.43 
2,025.75 
3,557.54 
1,783.31 
2,829.33 
2,015.76 
2,876.54 
11.80 
3,540.29 

433.12 
2,891.07 

146.19 
4,157.73 
4,559.98 
3,649.25 
3,894.41 
2,880.18 



180 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1. 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Ketteringham, John & Susan 

Keyes, Janet 

Kimball, Joan & John 

Kimnach, Elizabeth 

Kindleberger, Charles & Sarah 

King, Eleanor 

King, Pay-Shin & Tong-I 

King, William & Elizabeth 

Kingsbury, Howard & Ellen 

Kir by, Gerard 

Kirkpatrick, Margaret 

Kistiakowsky, Irma 

Kitses, Steven & Mary 

Kjellander, Mary 

Klem, Christopher & Susan 

Kling, John & Louise 

Klobuchar, John & N Maribeth 

Knowlton, Anne 

Knox, Wendell & Lucile 

Ko, Nai Nan & Julia 

Koehler, Edward & Margaret 

Kolbin, Lawrence & Rebecca 

Kolligian, Zoe 

Konstandakis, Nicholas & Mary 

Korhonen, Miriam 

Kornfeld, George & Hulen 

Koslowski, T. & Revell, P. 

Koumantzelis, Arthur & Vaia 

Koupas, William & Jeanne 

Kreidler, Anne 

Kroin, Lawrence 

Kruse, Katerine 

Kubik, James & Elizabeth 

Kuhns, Roger & Roberta 

Kuhns-Dimanescu, Katherine 

Kulka, J Peter 

Kumar, Suparna 

Kumler, Kipton & Katherine 

Kurtz, Arthur 

Kurzina, Peter & Stephanie 

Kusik, Charles & Wendy Palu 

Kwasniak, Walter 



Lackner-Graybiel, James & Ann 
Ladjevardi, Habib & Golnaz 
Lahnstein, Richard 
Landry, Christopher & Barrie 
Lane, J Frank & Kathleen 



311,200 


$ 2,825.70 


269,500 


2,447.06 


344,400 


3,127.15 


282,200 


2,562.38 


332,900 


3,022.73 


331,800 


3,012.74 


303,700 


2,757.60 


284,000 


2,578.72 


297,800 


2,704.02 


243,200 


2,208.26 


402,100 


3,651.07 


493,600 


4,481.89 


398,400 


3,617.47 


301,000 


2,733.08 


351,600 


3,192.53 


255,500 


2,319.94 


302,900 


2,750.33 


525,500 


4,771.54 


393,600 


3,573.89 


725,700 


6,589.36 


289,100 


2,625.03 


371,100 


3,369.59 


634,700 


5,763.08 


295,900 


2,686.77 


258,800 


2,349.90 


241,700 


2,194.64 


211,100 


1,916.79 


531,900 


4,829.65 


536,000 


4,866.88 


230,800 


2,095.66 


357,700 


3,247.92 


262,900 


2,387.13 


392,900 


3,567.53 


498,100 


4,522.75 


532,600 


4,836.01 


204,900 


1,860.49 


380,200 


3,452.22 


632,700 


5,744.92 


327,400 


2,972.79 


299,400 


2,718.55 


307,200 


2,789.38 


247,500 


2,247.30 


428,600 


3,891.69 


767,500 


6,968.90 


197,300 


1,791.48 


721,200 


6,548.50 


508,000 


4,612.64 



181 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, L987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Lang, Richard & Betty $ 444,400 $ 4,035.15 

Langton, William & Jane 474,800 4,311.18 

Lankhorst, Beverly 286,600 2,602.33 

Lathrop, Scott & Beatrice 371,400 3,372.31 

Lauterbach, Peter & Barbara 317,800 2,885.62 

Lavrakas, Apostle & Fofo 116,500 1,057.82 

Lawson, John 114,500 1,039.65 

Lay, Kenneth & Virginia 486,400 4,416.51 

Lazaridis, Lazarus & Suzanne 373,000 3,386.84 

Leaning, J. & Barron, R. 409,200 3,715.54 

Leape, Martha 400,700 3,638.36 

Lee, Alan & Deborah Peebles 401,600 3,646.53 

Lee, David 224,100 2,034.83 

Lee, Kenneth & Marcia 414,800 3,766.38 

Lee, Richard & Josephine Gump 548,000 4,975.84 

Lee, Shih Ying & Lena 491,800 4,465.54 

Lee, Thomas & Barbara 478,300 4,342.96 

Legates, John 539,100 4,895.03 

Leger, Mary, Tr. 187,300 1,700.68 

Leggat, Barbara 544,600 4,944.97 

Lemander, William & Emily 349,700 3,175.28 

Lemire, Robert & Virginia 346,100 3,142.59 

Lenington, Robert & Carolyn 358,700 3,257.00 

Lennon, James & Kathy Rushby 238,300 2,163.76 

Lennon, Stephen & Grace 321,400 2,918.31 

Leong, Joseph & Suzanna Szeto 234,200 2,126.54 

Lerman, Elizabeth 429,900 3,903.49 

Leshick, Margaret 341,000 3,096.28 

Leslie, Paul & Elizabeth 153,200 1,391.06 

Levey Jr, Harold & Ruth 274,700 2,494.28 

Levi, Thomas & Joyce King 303,700 2,757.60 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 384,600 3,492.16 

Levy, Morris & Wendy 254,000 2,306.32 

Levy, Raymond & Nonny 342,100 3,106.2 7 

Li, Mingche & June 551,000 5,003.08 

Li, Yao T & Nancy 501,800 4,556.34 

Liepins, Atis £ Diana 392,600 3,564.81 

Light Jr, Galen & Lois 261,900 2,378.05 

Lincoln Automotive 432,800 3,929.82 

Lincoln Homes Corp. 8,223,500 74,669.38 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corp 112,100 1,017.87 

Lincoln, Robert 489,500 4,444.66 

Linnell, Zenos & Geraldine 372,100 3,378.67 

Linstrom, Peter & Maybelle 221,300 2,009.40 

Lippman, Anne c/o Richard 251,800 2,286.34 

Lipsey, Steven & Michaela 551,300 5,005.80 

Litte, Rudolph 331,500 3,010.02 

Little, John & Elizabeth 363,200 3,297.86 

Littlefield, Paul & Emmy 271,500 2,465.22 



182 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Livermore Jr, Robert & Isabel $ 476,000 $ 4,322.08 

Lo, Chlen-Pen & Lucy 230,500 2,092.94 

Lo, Steven & Yi-Chao 262,200 2,380.78 

Lockwood Jr, Dunbar & Irene 563,700 5,118.40 

Loewenstein, Davida 357,100 3,242.47 

Loewenstein, Paul & Freud 399,600 3,628.37 

Long, Cathryn 369,800 3,357.78 

Loud, Robert & Gwyneth 240,200 2,181.02 

Lovering, Talbot & Emily 309,700 2,812.08 

Low, Stephen & Barbara 358,500 3,255.18 

Lozen, Stephen & Kristin 973,200 8,836.66 

Ludden, John & Susan 336,800 3,058.14 

Luft, Ludwig & Anne 338,700 3,075.40 

Lundquist, Peter & Joan 541,500 4,916.82 

Lupo, Robert 240,300 2,181.92 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand/lngeborg 391,500 3,554.82 

Lutnicki, Harriet 62,000 562.96 

Lutnicki, Victor & Harriet 564,500 5,125.66 

Lyons, Richard 242,700 2,203.72 

Lytle Jr, William 370,000 3,359.60 



MacClary, Malcolm Tr. 555,600 5,044.85 

MacDonald, Winslow & June 294,300 2,672.24 

Maclnnis, Hazel 213,600 1,939.49 

MacKenzie, Ethel 441,300 4,007.00 

MacKenzie, Murdock & Adeline 314,500 2,855.66 

MacLaurin, Elfriede 681,800 6,190.74 

MacLaurin, Ellen 456,000 4,140.48 

MacLean, H Arnold & Corinne 308,400 2,800.27 

MacLeod, Josephine 218,800 1,986.70 

MacMahon, Darcy & Lucia 656,600 5,961.93 

MacMahon, H Edward & Marian 258,300 2,345.36 

MacNeil, Bruce 392,900 3,567.53 

MacNeil, John & Madge 824,300 7,484.64 

MacNeil, Ronald & Wendy 216,000 1,961.28 

MacRae, S & Broadbent, E. 279,600 2,538.77 

Mahan, Russell & Anastasia 382,000 3,468.56 

Mahoney, George 220,300 2,000.32 

Mahoney, John & Eleanor 374,400 3,399.55 

Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 451,800 4,102.34 

Maillet, Joseph 150,800 1,369.26 

Maillet, Joseph & Busa Frank 713,600 6,479.49 

Malkin, James 384,500 3,491.26 

Malloy, David 157,000 1,425.56 

Malloy, Robert & David 90,800 824.46 

Maloney Jr, Bernard & Janet 389,700 3,538.48 

Mannarino, Joseph & Florence 184,300 1,673.44 

Manning, Catherine 221,200 2,008.50 



183 



VALUATION LIST, JULY L, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Mansfield, James & Sarah $ 323,700 $ 2,939.20 

Mansfield, Richard, Mary, Frederick, & Joan 479,300 4,352.04 

Manzelli, Donald & Janet 690,600 6,270.65 

Manzelli, John & Dorothy 227,800 2,068.42 

Maranian, Arthur & Helen 512,700 4,655.32 

Marcks, Ronald & Barbara 403,600 3,664.69 

Marcus, Fred & Patricia 358,200 3,252.46 

Marcuvitz, Andrew & Ileen 221,300 2,009.40 

Marier, Bruce & Suzanne 385,100 3,496.71 

Maroni, Kevin & Jaman 582,800 5,291.83 

Marple, Gary & Meredith R 439,900 3,994.29 

Marsden, Peter & Mary 263,000 2,388.04 

Marsh, Paul & Margaret 599,300 5,441.64 

Marstall, Jerry & Nancy C 356,600 3,237.93 

Martin, Robert & Margaret 258,700 2,349.00 

Martin, Winslow & Anne 247,300 2,245.48 

Martinez, Norberto 227,000 2,061.16 

Martini, William & Virginia 358,900 3,258.81 

Mascari, Rita & Luciano 444,000 4,031.52 

Mason, Betty 235,500 2,138.34 

Mason, Richard & Ann 219,100 1,989.43 

Mason, Virginia 408,800 3,711.90 

Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 3,077,400 27,942.79 

Massachusetts Port Authority 1,349,200 12,250.74 

Masters, Joseph 475,100 4,313.91 

Mathur, Dilip & Estelle 266,400 2,418.91 

Mattes, Sara & Ritz, Jerome 352,600 3,201.61 

Maurer, David & Marks, Joyce 190,000 1,725.20 

May Jr, James & Linda 788,200 7,156.86 

May, Doris 272,300 2,472.48 

Mayfield, Glover & Gale 388,400 3,526.67 

McAleer, Harold & Shirley 480,900 4,366.57 

McCart, Robert Tr. 505,100 4,586.31 

McCarthy, Paul & Wladyslawa 539,700 4,900.47 

McColl, Archibald & Delight 244,900 2,223.69 

McConchie, James & Linda 479,000 4,349.32 

McCune, William & Elizabeth 1,810,300 16,437.52 

McDougald, Ronald & Kathleen 551,100 5,003.99 

McHale, Kevin 950,400 8,629.63 

McHugh, James & Katherine 366,600 3,328.73 

Mclnnes, Richard & Barbara 630,800 5,727.66 

Mclnnis, Donald & Joan 309,900 2,813.89 

McKennan, Alice 338,100 3,069.95 

McKnight, David 90,900 825.37 

McKnight, David & Eleanor 215,700 1,958.56 

McKnight, Ernest Ex. 235,800 2,141.06 

McLaughlin, James 17,800 161.62 

McLaughlin, Robert & Roberta 263,500 2,392.58 

McMorrow, Maureen & Richard 598,900 5,438.01 



184 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



McSweeney, Eugene & Barbara $ 175,500 $ 1,593.54 

Mead, Varnum & Janice 359,800 3,266.98 

Meade, Edmund & Eleanor 394,800 3,584.78 

Mecsas, Michael & Mary 387,500 3,518.50 

Meeks, M Littleton & Louise 411,000 3,731.88 

Meenan, Marion 400,800 3,639.26 

Melanson, Leonard & Mary 186,100 1,689.79 

Menino, Mary 252,200 2,289.98 

Meriam, Ellin 284,000 2,578.72 

Merrill, Vincent & Anne 277,600 2,520.61 

Merullo, Anthony 291,700 2,648.64 

Messina, Elena 508,500 4,617.18 

Meyer, Eugene & Melissa 828,600 7,523.69 

Michener, Susanah 190,500 1,729.74 

Middleton, Neil & Susan A 470,200 4,269.42 

Mikropoulos, Harilaos Tr. 526,000 4,776.08 

Milender, Sumner & Edith 485,000 4,403.80 

Millard Jr, Donald/Catherine 607,100 5,512.47 

Millard, Donald & Jeannette 685,000 6,219.80 

Millard, Susan & David 706,000 6,410.48 

Miller, David & Karen 231,500 2,102.02 

Miller, Harold & Marcheta 489,200 4,441.94 

Miller, Keith & Janet 518,100 4,704.35 

Miller, Peter 338,500 3,073.58 

Miller, Stephen & Natalie 369,800 3,357.78 

Miller, Wayne 470,800 4,274.86 

Mills, Marie F.A.L. 368.500 3,345.98 

Minnick, Martha 235,400 2,137.43 

Mintz, Norbett & Carol 438,000 3,977.04 

Mix, Thomas 344,900 3,131.69 

Mixon, Scott 328,600 2,983.69 

Mohr, John & Jean 764,200 6,938.94 

Moldave, Peter M 159,300 1,446.44 

Moller, Cynthia 225,500 2,047.54 

Montgomery, Maurice/Florence 272,200 2,471.58 

Moor, Edgar & Joan 590,300 5,359.92 

Moore, Dorothy 278,100 2,525.15 

Moore, Elizabeth 232,200 2,108.38 

Moore, Murvale & Negarre 366,000 3,323.28 

Moran, David & Mary B. 361,500 3,282.42 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth 202,400 1,837.79 

Morgan III, Robert & Marcia 867,000 7,872.36 

Morgan, Edward & Terrl 224,200 2,035.74 

Morgan, Henry & Gwen 504,600 4,581.76 

Morganti, Victor & Helga 482,400 4,380.19 

Morris, Beatrice 167,400 1,519.99 

Morris, Lloyd & Katherine 256,800 2,331.74 

Morrissey, J Neil & Mary 237,900 2,160.13 

Morse, Thomas 485,000 4,403.80 



185 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Morse, William & Patricia 

Morss Jr, Charles 

Morton, Peter & Judy 

Moses, Meredyth & John 

Mosher & Schlieraann 

Mosher, David & Claire 

Mosher, David Tr. 

Moss, Elizabeth 

Moss, James & Katherine G 

Moss, Karen 

Moss, Leonard & Frances 

Moss, Philip & Jane 

Moss, Sidney 

Moss, Sidney & Silke 

Mount, Wayne & Claire 

Mozzi, Robert & Ruth 

Mrakovich, David & Gertrude 

Mrugala, Anthony 

Mudge, Jeffrey 

Mueller, Robert & Jane 

Mukitarian, Stephanie Tr 

Mulcahy, Douglas & Beverly F 

Munroe Jr, William & Mary 

Murphy Jr, William & Louise 

Murphy, B. & Silverstein, S. 

Murphy, Ruth 

Mutschler, Louis & Phyllis 

Myers, Lucy 

Mygatt, Samuel & Susan H 

Myles, Theresa & J Richard 



$ 613,200 
302,600 
283,600 
431,300 
111,400 
854,100 

81,800 
654,700 
251,000 
290,200 
311,100 
393,900 

17,400 
398,700 
354,900 
385,400 
345,000 
252,400 
239,500 
548,600 
234,700 
214,100 
377,500 
1,300 
267,300 
434,700 
379,500 
271,000 
380,700 
393,300 



5,567.85 
2,747.61 
2,575.09 
3,916.20 
1,011.51 
7,755.22 

742.74 
5,944.68 
2,279.08 
2,635.02 
2,824.79 
3,576.61 

157.99 
3,620.20 
3,222.49 
3,499.43 
3,132.60 
2,291.79 
2,174.66 
4,981.29 
2,131.08 
1,944.03 
3,427.70 
11.80 
2,427.08 
3,947.08 
3,445.86 
2,460.68 
3,456.76 
3,571.16 



Nabih, Ismail 

Nadolski, Thomas & Rosemary 

Nagy, John 

Naiman, Mark & Adeline 

Najarian, K George & Carolann 

Najjar, Edward & Gail 

Nardone, Nancy 

Narod, Joel 

Natwig, David & Monica 

Nawoichik, Elsie Adm 

Neely, J. & Sullivan, C. 

Neiley, Alexander & Diana 

Nelson, Albert & Marjorie 

Nelson, Jean (Parsons) 

Nenneman, Richard & Catherine 

Nessen, E. Richard 

Nesto, Bruno 



470,400 
381,800 
320,700 
269,000 
611,700 
521,700 
516,600 
234,600 
247,600 
504,800 
314,700 
393,500 
273,700 
441,200 
454,400 
462,100 
19,200 



4,271.23 
3,466.74 
2,911.96 
2,442.52 
5,554.24 
4,737.04 
4,690.73 
2,130.17 
2,248.21 
4,583.58 
2,857.48 
3,572.98 
2,485.20 
4,006.10 
4,125.95 
4,195.87 
174.34 



186 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Neumann, Ernest & Sylvia $ 798,600 $ 7,251.29 

Neumann, Sylvia 30,200 274.22 

Newbold, Thomas 164,900 1,497.29 

Newbold, Thomas & Noreen 245,300 2,227.32 

Newburger, Babette 362,500 3,291.50 

Newcombe, Charles & Lawrence 373,200 3,388.66 

Newcombe, Lawrence 174,300 1,582.64 

Newell, Lena 244,500 2,220.06 

Newman, Daisy 173,300 1,573.56 

Newman, Robert & Mary S 1,271,200 11,542.50 

Newton Jr, George & Suzanne 370,800 3,366.86 

Newton, Harland 298,300 2,708.56 

Nicholson, Kathryn 537,000 4,875.96 

Nickerson, Bruce 227,100 2,062.07 

Nickerson, Elizabeth P 497,000 4,512.76 

Nicolaides, Paris Tr. 765,300 6,948.92 

Niles, Robert & Virginia 333,000 3,023.64 

Nisbet, Ian & Shirley 311,500 2,828.42 

Nockles, William & Diane 352,300 3,198.83 

Nopakun, Suvitya & Apilaj 467,100 4,241.27 

Norling, Robert & Jean 238,000 2,161.04 

Norris, Mary 277,300 2,517.88 

Norton, David Tr. 272,200 2,471.58 

Noss, George & Millicent 228,300 2,072.96 

Notkin, Leonard & Ann 325,500 2,955.54 

Nunes, Geoffrey & Clare 611,800 5,555.14 



O'Brien, Daniel & Mary 326,700 2,966.44 

O'Brien, John 124,200 1,127.74 

O'Brien, Joseph & Virginia 297,400 2,700.39 

O'Connor, Daniel 203,800 1,850.50 

O'Connor, John 434,800 3,947.98 

O'Loughlin, John & Joanne 360,900 3,276.97 

O'Neil, David 308,300 2,799.36 

O'Neil, T & Buckley, J 224,200 2,035.74 

O'Rourke, Paul & Marilyn 906,700 8,232.84 

Oak, Ingul & Setsuko 381,200 3,461.30 

Obey, Fred & Florence 764,500 6,941.66 

Ogden, David 475,500 4,317.54 

Ohl, Robert & Irina 123,800 1,124.10 

Okin, Robert & Susan 755,300 6,858.12 

Old Bedford Road Realty Trust 955,300 8,674.13 

Old Concord Road Trust 168,200 1,527.26 

Old, Bruce & Katharine 258,000 2,342.64 

Olivieri, James & Dorothy 143,800 1,305.70 

Olsen, Kenneth & Elva-Liisa 684,100 6,211.63 

Olshansky, Kenneth 277,300 2,517.88 

Onigman, Marc & Maureen 239,400 2,173.75 



187 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Order of Saint Anne $ 172,300 $ 1,564.48 

Orzell, Frank & Ann R. 386,500 3,500.42 

Osborne, Cordon 953,400 8,656.88 

Outten, Henry & Nancy 309,200 2,807.54 

Owen R Calvin & Ellen 289,000 2,624.12 

Owen, C & MacAloney, P. 283,500 2,574.18 

Owen, Donald 312,100 2,833.87 

Oxbow Realty Trust 1,300 11.80 



Paboojian-Hagopian, Helen 290,500 2,637.74 

Paddock, A. & Kelley, P. 123,800 1,124.10 

Paddock, James & Ilga 505,700 4,591.76 

Page Jr, Walter & Susan 527,100 4,786.07 

Page, Elliott & Emily 266,500 2,419.82 

Page, Lot & Patricia 413,200 3,751.86 

Page, Stanley & Elisabeth 230,800 2,095.66 

Paglierani, Lawrence & Pamela 320,000 2,905.60 

Paik, Sungik & Wanda 432,800 3,929.82 

Palmer, Attelio & Kathryne 253,000 2,297.24 

Pampel, Roland & Carol 742,800 6,744.62 

Panetta, Frank 300,000 2,724.00 

Panetta, Frank & James 22,200 201.58 

Panetta, Frank & Theresa 239,100 2,171.03 

Panetta, Franklin & Theresa 42,500 385.90 

Panetta, James & Rosemary 187,600 1,703.41 

Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 205,500 1,865.94 

Pantazelos, Peter & Hytho 784,700 7,125.08 

Pareek, Puma 472,300 4,288.48 

Paris, Judith 129,500 1,175.86 

Park, Charles & Pauline 335,600 3,047.25 

Parke IV, Nathan & Ann T 421,100 3,823.59 

Parke, Nathan & Anne I 14,200 128.94 

Parker, Charles & Helen 279,400 2,536.95 

Parker, Jackson & Jacqueline 357,400 3,245.19 

Parla, John 497,100 4,513.67 

Parsons, David & Mary 378,200 3,434.06 

Pastoriza, James & Ruth 498,300 4,524.56 

Patalano, Vincent & Sandra 1,040,000 9,443.20 

Paul, Louise 184,300 1,673.44 

Payne, H Morse & Helen 228,900 2,078.41 

Payne, Roger 334,000 3,032.72 

Payne, William & Mary 549,600 4,990.37 

Pearlman, Robert 254,600 2,311.77 

Pearmain, W Robert & Claire 540,400 4,906.83 

Peavy Jr, Leopold & Elizabeth 688,700 6,253.40 

Peirce, Isabel 344,500 3,128.06 

Peloquin, Roy 205,400 1,865.03 

Perch, Alvin & Geraldine 538,900 4,893.21 



188 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Perera Jr, Guldo & Joan $ 640,300 $ 5,813.92 

Perlman, Samuel & Marjorie 855,000 7,763.40 

Perlmutter, Steven & Terry 514,200 4,668.94 

Perrault, Norm, Guy, Patricia 213,000 1,934.04 

Perry, A.W. & Judith 395,100 3,587.51 

Perry, John & Marilyn 248,900 2,260.01 

Perry, John & Sarah 398,900 3,622.01 

Perry, Richard & Nancy 459,700 4,174.07 

Pertzoff, Olga 15,200 138.01 

Peterson, Mary 572,100 5,194.67 

Pettigrew, Valerie & Brian 606,000 5,502.48 

Phelps, Elaine 253,500 2,301.78 

Phelps, Robert & Elizabeth 371,500 3,373.22 

Phelps-Braun, Diane 377,800 3,430.42 

Phillipps, Patrick & Janice 488,900 4,439.21 

Phillips, Charlotte 701,700 6,371.43 

Phinney, Jean 246,700 2,240.04 

Pho, Johnny & Ada 444,400 4,035.16 

Pianka, Walter & Ann 381,600 3,464.93 

Piccinini, Helen 273,300 2,481.56 

Pickett, Robert & Annette 430,700 3,910.76 

Pickman, Anthony & Alice 1,122,600 10,193.21 

Pierce, James & Vivian W. 301,600 2,738.53 

Pike, John & Mary 571,300 5,187.40 

Pikl, Gerolf & Barbara 398,400 3,617.47 

Pingeon, James 204,300 1,855.04 

Pino, Frank 231,400 2,101.11 

Pinto, Robert & Clare 465,900 4,230.37 

Plouffe, Francis & Gerene 307,500 2,792.10 

Plukas, John & Anne 670,700 6,089.96 

Podsen, Robert & Doris 480,900 4,366.57 

Ponchatoula Limited 456,200 4,142.30 

Ponn, Richard & Nancy 855,800 7,770.66 

Postel, Sholem 279,500 2,537.86 

Potter, Ruth/DiLuzio, Rudolph 397,000 3,604.76 

Poulos, Charles & Sophie 334,800 3,039.98 

Poulos, L Charles 196,500 1,784.22 

Powers Jr, Francis & Helen 206,600 1,875.93 

Powers, Martin & Diana 230,200 2,090.22 

Preston, Katharine 262,300 l 2,381.68 

Preston, William M 666,400 6,050.91 

Priest, Sarah/Breed, Charles 402,500 3,654.70 

Privitera, Salvatore & Doris 574,600 5,217.37 

Protopapa, Sejfi 502,500 4,562.70 

Pruitt, Stephen & Denise 220,700 2,003.96 

Prussing, Carl & Karen 9,700 88.08 

Puffer Jr, Richard & Margaret 381,700 3,465.84 

Pugh III, Alexander & Julia 375,800 3,412.26 



189 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Valu«* Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Quarton, Gardner & Frances $ 316,800 i 2,876.54 

Quelch, John & Joyce 497,500 4,517.30 

Raag, Valvo 529,100 4,804.23 

Raag, Valvo & Kaija 150,400 1,365.63 

Rabinowitz,Samuel/Stanlslawa 365,000 3,314.20 

Ragan, Ralph & Ruth 273,700 2,485.20 

Ragan, Ralph R 88,700 805.40 

Raghavan,Lakshminarasimhan 531,100 4,822.39 

Raja, Roy & Ellen 330,100 2,997.31 

Rando, Thomas J 442,300 4,016.08 

Rappaport, Jerome & Phyllis 786,900 7,145.05 

Rapperport, Eugene & Lucy 312,200 2,834.78 

Rappoli, Arthur & Dorothy 292,900 2,659.53 

Rasco, Austin & Suzanne 458,300 4,161.36 

Rashin, Louis & Shirley 325,600 2,956.45 

Rawson, Edward & Nancy 347,300 3,153.48 

Ray, Kenneth & Marjorie 291,700 2,648.64 

Rayner, Evelyn H. 245,300 2,227.32 

Read, J L/Mokrovich, Carol 275,400 2,500.63 

Redden, Linda 246,600 2,239.13 

Redmond, Rosemary 377,100 3,424.07 

Reece, Richard & Susan 415,900 3,776.37 

Reid, Cynthia 228,500 2,074.78 

Reidel, Arthur H 268,300 2,436.16 

Reider, W James & Ruth 391,000 3,550.28 

Reiman, Peter & Patricia 289,800 2,631.38 

Reinherz, Bernard & Barbara 691,800 6,281.54 

Reinherz, Ellis L 355,200 3,225.22 

Reiser, George 744,400 6,759.15 

Reiman, Arnold & Harriet 482,600 4,382.01 

Repko, Bruce 169,000 1,534.52 

Resnick, Charles & Marie 476,000 4,322.08 

Ricci, Russell & Carla 458,600 4,164.09 

Rice, Clifton & Margaret 434,600 3,946.17 

Rice, David B. 328,300 2,980.96 

Rice, James & Barbara 254,900 2,314.49 

Rice, John & Nathalie 204,500 1,856.86 

Rice, Paul G 244,300 2,218.24 

Richards, Ruth 309,000 2,805.72 

Richardson, Frederick/Inge 332,100 3,015.47 

Riker, Evelyn 228,500 2,074.78 

Risch, Martin 275,800 2,504.26 

Risley, Curtis & Jean 327,700 2,975.52 

Risser, Thomas & Tranquilina 850,000 7,718.00 

Ritsher, John 624,400 5,669.55 

Rizzo, William & Jane 338,100 3,069.95 
Robb, Stephen J. $ 248,100 $ 2,252.75 



190 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Robb, Stephen Tr. $ 496,300 $ 4,506.40 

Robbat, Joseph & Dana 987,800 8,969.22 

Robbins, Frederick 342,900 3,113.53 

Robbins, Roland & Geraldine 226,500 2,056.62 

Robey, Harriet 286,100 2,597.79 

Robinson, Dora 201,000 1,825.08 

Robinson, John & Ragnhild 433,800 3,938.90 

Robinson, Thomas & Leslie 1,517,900 13,782.53 

Rodman, Paul 722,400 6,559.39 

Roehr, Marcia 683,500 6,206.18 

Rogers, Alfred & Louise 371,500 3,373.22 

Rogers, Diana 442,400 4,016.99 

Rogers, Harriet J 316,400 2,872.91 

Rogers, Joseph H 161,500 1,466.42 

Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred etc 472,600 4,291.21 

Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 349,900 3,177.09 

Rollins, James & Norma 397,000 3,604.76 

Rood, Jane 202,300 1,836.88 

Rose, James & Glenys 287,200 2,607.78 

Rose, Stuart & Margie 437,500 3,972.50 

Rosen, Esther 247,500 2,247.30 

Rosen, Joseph 461,000 4,185.88 

Rosen, Paul & Annette 242,300 2,200.08 

Rosenthal, Richard & Blanche 248,800 2,259.10 

Rosenwald, Harold & Betty 475,300 4,315.72 

Ross, Paul & Rita 411,100 3,732.79 

Ross, William & Marian 368,200 3,343.26 

Rossbach, Leopold & Janice 310,900 2,822.97 

Rossiter, Selina 436,800 3,966.14 

Rossoni, John & Paola 667,900 6,064.54 

Rossoni, Paola 173,300 1,573.56 

Roth, David 485,800 4,411.06 

Row, Ronald & Jane 413,000 3,750.04 

Rowe, Standish S 499,100 4,531.83 

Roy, Eugene U. 213,000 1,934.04 

Rudnick, Mitchell & Rosalie 629,600 5,716.77 

Rugo, Henry & Faith 475,700 4,319.36 

Ruland, Fred W. 608,100 5,521.55 

Rural Land Foundation 3,095,900 28,110.76 

Russell, Mary-Ellen 388,900 3,531.21 

Russell, Michael & Nancy P. 291,800 2,649.54 

Russell, William U Anne 964,800 8,760.38 

Ryan, A & Chisholm M. 16,100 146.19 

Ryan, Alice B. 325,000 2,951.00 

Ryan, Alice/Sweeney, John 161,500 1,466.42 

Ryan, Frank A. 215,200 1,954.02 

Ryan, James & Helen 252,500 2,292.70 

Ryan, Marjorie H. 338,400 3,072.67 

Ryan, William & Helen 406,500 3,691.02 



191 



VALUATION LIST, JULY I, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



S.P.N.E.A. $ 177,500 * 1,611.70 

Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn 237,900 2,160.13 

Sacerdote, Luciana 245,300 2,227.32 

Sacknoff, Eric & Kathleen 731,100 6,638.39 

Sakowlch, S & Kasiekl, J 154,300 1,401.04 

Salem, Deeb & Patricia 647,500 5,879.30 

Salmon, Walter & Marjorie 412,900 3,749.13 

Sanadi, D Rao & Mary Jane 372,200 3,379.58 

Sands, Mary M. 277,000 2,515.16 

Santa, Cecelia F. 267,100 2,425.27 

Sargent, Dennis 412,400 3,744.59 

Sartori, Louis & Ruth 397,700 3,611.12 

Sartori, Louis R. 138,300 1,255.76 

Satterfield, Charles & Anne 426,200 3,869.90 

Savage, William G. 321,500 2,919.22 

Sawtell, Clement & Adelaide 336,500 3,055.42 

Schatzberg, Alan & Nancy 376,100 3,414.99 

Scheff, Andrew 151,500 1,375.62 

Scheff, Benson & Betty 422,500 3,836.30 

Scheft, William & Gertrude 294,600 2,674.97 

Scheuer, Harry 350,900 3,186.17 

Schildbach, Muriel 274,600 2,493.36 

Schliemann, Peter C. 563,200 5,113.86 

Schmertzler, Margaretta/Alvin 470,600 4,273.05 

Schmid, Wilfried & Marina 772,400 7,013.38 

Schneider, Robert & Patricia 506,200 4,596.30 

Schudy, Robert & Linelle 126,400 1,147.71 

Schuller, Edward & Elizabeth 312,500 2,837.50 

Schulte, Robert & Linda S 621,000 5,638.68 

Schwann, William 232,800 2,113.82 

Schwann, William & Aire-Maija 370,300 3,362.32 

Schwartz, Edward 500,800 4,547.26 

Schwartz, Judah & Ellen 349,200 3,170.74 

Scott, Bruce & Anne 576,500 5,234.62 

Scott, Eleanor 323,900 2,941.01 

Scotti, Regina 109,300 1,718.84 

Seaver, John & Millicent 382,800 3,475.82 

Seckler, Donald & Joann S. 228,500 2,074,78 

Sederquist, Douglas/Patricia 221,300 2,009.40 

Sedgwick, Harold B. 385,400 3,499.43 

Seeckts, E William & Eleanor 112,600 1,022.41 

Seeckts, Ehlert W & Eleanor 443,000 4,022.44 

Seeley, George & Susan 272,200 2,471.58 

Selland, James 0. 238,400 2,164.67 

Seising, Erik & Jo-Ellen 215,800 1,959.46 

Semerjian, Evan & Barbara 435,500 3,954.34 

Seville, Alfred & Joan 350,000 3,178.00 

Sewall, Steven & Susan 685,900 6,227.97 

Shallah, George & Lynda 239,000 2,170.12 



192 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Shansky, David & Nettie 
Shapiro, David & Esther 
Shapse, Steven N. 
Sharpe, John & Jeanne 
Shaw, Michael & Lynette 
Shea, William & Margaret 
Sheehan, Gerald & Brigid 
Sheldon, Mary W. 
Shuman, Mark & Lena 
Sichel, Enid 

Silverstein, Fred & Mary 
Simmons, Jeffrey & Patricia 
Simon, Michael & Margaret 
Simourian, John 
Sisson, John & Barbara 
Skinner, Louis & Hope 
Slavin, Gerald D 
Slayter, Elizabeth 
Sliski, Alan & Susan 
Smallman, Robert & Mary 
Smith, Alan & Marjorie 
Smith, Beverly 
Smith, Carl & Florence 
Smith, Converse & Nellie 
Smith, Edward & Anne 
Smith, Harold & Elizabeth 
Smith, Kathleen 
Smith, Peter & Linda 
Smith, Steven & Karen 
Smith, William & Barbara 
Smith. Colin & Diana 
Smulowicz, Bronislaw/Sawera 
Snelling, Charles 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth 
Snelling, Jacquelyn 
Snelling, John R 
Snelling, Norman & Carolyn 
Solar, Barry & Judith 
Solar, Robert & Jane 
Solman, Fred & Claire 
Spaeth, Daniel & Margaret 
Speen, George & Claire 
Speert, Peter & Faye 
Sperling, Arnold & Charmaih 
Spindler, James & Mary 
Spinosa, Robert & Kathleen 
Spooner, Susan B. 
Sprague, John L 
Sprayregen, Lucy 



370,500 


* 3,364.14 


430,300 


3,907.12 


175,100 


1,589.91 


308,100 


2,797.55 


563,400 


5,115.67 


208,000 


1,888.64 


294,600 


2,674.97 


335,200 


3,043.62 


466,700 


4,237.64 


294,800 


2,676.78 


254,800 


2,313.58 


543,900 


4,938.61 


382,400 


3,472.19 


452,800 


4,111.42 


590,100 


5,358.11 


882,600 


8,014.01 


317,300 


2,881.08 


272,100 


2,470.67 


416,200 


3,779.10 


572,100 


5,194.67 


466,300 


4,234.00 


234,500 


2,129.26 


273,400 


2,482.47 


403,300 


3,661.96 


235,500 


2,138.34 


349,100 


3,169.83 


228,500 


2,074.78 


1,300 


11.80 


303,200 


2,753.06 


263,200 


2,389.86 


348,100 


3,160.75 


317,700 


2,884.72 


273,100 


2,479.75 


248,800 


2,259.10 


331,200 


3,007.30 


189,700 


1,722.48 


253,600 


2,302.69 


504,000 


4,576.32 


383,500 


3,482.18 


395,900 


3,594.77 


270,900 


2,459.77 


514,600 


4,672.57 


584,600 


5,308.17 


369,200 


3,352.34 


624,400 


5,669.55 


352,300 


3,198.88 


165,300 


1,500.92 


268,300 


2,436.16 


475,100 


4,313.91 



193 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1937 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Spreadbury, Roberta I. t 229,900 I 2,087.49 

Squibb, Mildred G. 179,500 1,629.86 

Squire, James & Barbara 540,900 4,911.37 

Stam, Allan & Kathleen 722,200 6,557.57 

Stankard, Charles & Jean 375,000 3,405.00 

Stanzler, Alan & Margaret 653,000 5,929.24 

Stason, William & Susan 524,000 4,757.92 

Staszesky, Barbara & Francis 274,200 2,489.74 

Stathos, Charles & Margaret 482,300 4,379.28 

Stebbins Realty Trust 218,700 1,985.80 

Stecher, Robert & Barbara 519,500 4,717.06 

Stein, Kitty/Langell, John 262,800 2,386.22 

Stetson, David & Athena 455,900 4,139.57 

Stevens, Edmund & Shari 515,600 4,681.65 

Stevenson, John & Patricia 364,800 3,312.38 

Stevenson, Philip & Joan 471,000 4,276.68 

Stewart, Francis & Ruth 353,800 3,212.50 

Stimmell, David & Grace 253,000 2,297.24 

Stoddard, Roger & Helen 302,300 2,744.88 

Stone, Edmund 926,300 8,410.80 

Storer, James & Sandra A. 419,800 3,730.06 

Stratford Realty 1,332,900 12,102.73 

Stratton, Michael & Nancy 280,400 2,546.03 

Street, Earle & Janet 421,500 3,827.22 

Striker, Marjorie 262,900 2,387.13 

Strock, Bruce & Deborah 539,100 4,895.03 

Strong, Steven/Wylie, Apte 395,300 3,589.32 

Subsick, Walter J. 606,700 5,508.84 

Sugar, Elizabeth/ Mason, Max 269,800 2,449.78 

Summers, James & Julia 351,400 3,190.71 

Sussman, Joseph & Henri-Ann 442,300 4,016.08 

Sutherland, Robert & Ann 364,600 3,310.57 

Svetz, Paul & Linda 389,100 3,533.03 

Swain, Douglas & Rhonda 390,100 3,542.10 

Swanson, Richard & Nancy 237,500 2,156.50 

Sweeney, Carl & Alice 375,000 3,405.00 

Swett, Joan 268,300 2,436.16 

Swift, Phyllis 375,500 3,409.54 

Sykes, Margaret 322,700 2,930.12 

Sylvia, Craig, Paul & Mark 278,200 2,526.06 



Tang, Eric & Doreen 590,300 5,359.92 

Tang, Thomas, Connie, Nora, Lisa 222,200 2,017.58 

Tannert, H Michael & Joanna H 317,800 2,885.62 

Tartaglia, Giovanni & Lucia 244,400 2,219.15 

Taschioglou, Kemon & Rhoda 512,500 4,653.50 

Tatlock, Richard & Jane 450,700 4,092.36 

Taunton-Rigby, Alison 301,900 2,741.25 



194 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Taylor, 


David & Cormay, T. 


Taylor, 


Edward S. 


Taylor, 


Frederick & Lex 


Taylor, 


Julius & Lois 


Taylor, 


Lillian C. 


Taylor, 


Timothy & Jeannine 


Taylor, 


W Royce & Dorothy 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Tavilla, J David & Dorothea $ 633,500 $ 5,752.10 

Taylor, Barry & Elizabeth 280,200 2,544.22 

222,200 2,017.58 

474,300 4,306.64 

348,600 3,165.29 

455,300 4,134.12 

234,100 2,125.63 

266,500 2,419.82 

333,300 3,026.36 

Taylor, William & Joyce 170,800 1,550.86 

Teabo, Prince & Elizabeth 244,500 2,220.16 

Telling, Irving & Jane 380,800 3,457.66 

Tenneco, Inc. 1,500 13.62 

Tennican, Michael & Catherine 478,100 4,341.15 

Terrell, John & Mary 262,400 2,382.59 

Tetreault, Claire F. 433,400 3,935.27 

Theriault, Richard & Vita 545,000 4,948.60 

Thomas, George & Jane 212,300 1,927.68 

Thomas, Gordon & Alice 232,300 2,109.28 

Thompson, G Brooks & Arlene 273,500 2,483.38 

Thompson, Lawrence & Dorothy 434,700 3,947.08 

Thomson, Anne P. 247,900 2,250.93 

Thorne, Karen 0. 288,400 2,618.67 

Thornton, Peter & Ann 15,100 137.11 

Three S Realty Trust 624,200 5,667.74 

Thurow, Lester & Gretchen P 779,900 7,081.49 

Ticknor, H Malcolm 258,500 2,347.18 

Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 421,900 3,830.85 

Tingey, Ruth Ray 397,300 3,607.48 

Tingley, Frederick & Dilla 297,000 2,696.76 

Titus, William A. 111,200 1,009.70 

Tod, Jane N. 235,000 2,133.80 

Todd, Conrad 698,500 6,342.30 

Todd, Conrad & Harriet 13,700 124.40 

Todd, Donald & Mary 1,300 11.80 

Todd, Eveleth R. 243,800 2,213.70 

Toksoz, M Nafi & Helena 163,200 1,481.86 

Toler, Louise C. 234,400 2,128.35 

Tomasic, Michael & Beverly 590,300 , 5,359.92 

Tong, Pin & Siang 253,500 2,301.78 

Torode, Herbert & Lorraine 245,800 2,231.86 

Torri, Myra M. 338,800 3,076.30 

Torti, Maurice & Nancy 487,500 4,426.50 

Touborg, Margaret 454,300 4,125.04 

Tracey, Elizabeth M. 509,100 4,622.63 

Tracey, Robert & Caroline 539,900 4,902.29 

Tracey, Robert J. 267,800 2,431.63 

Travers, Paul & Bernice 403,800 3,666.50 

Trevelyan, Eoin & J Ann 270,800 2,458.86 



195 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Trolsl, Eugene A. i 293,400 t 2,664.07 

Troisi, Ferdinand & Mary 223,900 2,033.01 

Tryder, Michael & Maureen 273,100 2,479.75 

Tucker, Janet L. 117,100 1,063.27 

Tunnell, Raymond & Suzanne 349,900 3,177.09 

Turano, Anthony & Florence 80,400 730.03 

Turner, James & Beverly 389,000 3,532.12 

Turner, James & Mildred 324,200 2,943.74 

Turowski, Edmund J. 575,500 5,225.54 

Tyler, Marion L. 146,900 1,333.85 

Tyler, Priscilla D. 294,300 2,672.24 

Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 161,400 1,465.51 

Tylko, John J. 820,400 7,449.23 



U S Dynamics Realty Trust 28,400 257.87 

Ulfelder, Thomas & Sue 487,100 4,422.87 

Ullman, Steven/Amy & Gerald 426,000 3,868.08 

Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 307,300 2,790.28 

Uretsky, Joseph & Harriet 507,600 4,609.01 

Urner, Joseph F. 323,600 2,938.29 

Ury, William L. 352,300 3,198.88 

Vagliano, Andre & Leslie 397,600 3,610.21 

Valley Pond Corporation 9,600 87.16 

VanBuskirk, David & Elizabeth 410,100 3,723.71 

VanLeer, Hans 1,800 16.34 

VanLeer, Hans & Mary 407,100 3,696.47 

VanLeer, R. Karl & Rachel 425,200 3,860.82 

VanLeer, Rachel D. 129,000 1,171.32 

Vataha, Randel & Deborah 426,800 3,875.33 

Venier, Anthony & Catherine 673,700 6,117.20 

Vercollone, Edmund & Julia 259,600 2,357.17 

Vet, Maria 254,100 2,307.23 

Vitale, Joseph & Christine 233,000 2,569.64 

Vockel, Virginia 246,700 2,240.04 

VonMertens, Ernest & Beatrice 189,700 1,640.76 

VonMertens, Peter & Page 403,000 3,659.24 

Wadsworth, Virginia D. 358,100 3,251.55 

Wales, Betty R. 173,300 1,573.56 

Wales, R Langdon & Ruth 379,500 3,445.86 

Wales, Roger & Patricia R. 269,700 2,448.88 

Walker, John & Joan 393,000 3,568.44 

Walker, Roger S. 293,300 2,663.16 

Walker, Sydney A. 464,100 4,214.03 

Wallroth, Donald & Eln 531,300 4,824.20 

Wallwork, Edwin & Janice 278,200 2,526.06 

Walsh, Patricia R. 227,600 2,066.61 



196 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Walter, Charlton & Rosly $ 430,800 t 3,911.66 

Wang, An & Lorraine 1,260,200 11,442.61 

Wang, Chlu-Chen & Pauline 457,900 4,157.73 

Wang, Frederick A. 173,300 1,573.56 

Wang, Thomas & Jacqueline 463,800 4,211.31 

Warbler Springs Corp. 1,002,700 9,104.51 

Ward Jr, Walter & Marie 228,700 2,076.60 

Ward, Jane L. 224,600 2,039.37 

Ward, Walter & Sophie 220,100 1,998.51 

Warner, Henrietta S. 452,600 4,109.61 

Warner, Patricia R. 245,300 2,227.32 

Warren, Duncan & Helen 316,100 2,870.19 

Warren, Joan B. 251,600 2,284.53 

Waterfall Realty Trust 556,900 5,056.65 

Watson, John & Gail V. 423,700 3,847.20 

Waugh, John S. 366,500 3,327.82 

Webb, Robert & Sonia J. 338,200 3,070.86 

Webster, David & Winifred 482,100 4,377.47 

Webster, Peter T. 507,200 4,605.38 

Weigel, Lynn & Irene 522,000 4,739.76 

Weigel, Lynn B. 103,200 937.06 

Weisman, Rodger & Pamela 844,000 7,663.52 

Welch, Nathaniel & Debra 317,500 2,882.90 

Welch, Vernon & Leatrice 234,700 2,131.08 

Wengren et al, Richard 59,000 535.72 

Wengren, Margaret L. 597,900 5,428.93 

Westcott, Vernon & Mary 274,300 2,490.64 

Weston Rd Realty Trust 203,100 1,844.15 

Whalen, William & Mary 201,100 1,825.99 

Whatley, Robert & Kay 224,200 2,035.74 

Wheeler, Bella C. 278,500 2,528.78 

Wheelock, Susan K. 559,400 5,079.35 

White, Elinor/Grossbart, S. 275,200 2,498.82 

White, James & Carol 789,700 7,170.47 

White, John & Gina 473,600 4,300.29 

White, Katharine & John 623,200 5,658.65 

White, Robert & Marion 289,900 2,632.29 

White, Thomas J. 676,700 6,144.44 

Whiteside, Elinor I. 245,300 2,227.32 

Whitman, Lawrence & Joanne 414,800 3,766.38 

Whitman, Virginia R. 621,100 5,639.59 

Wiersema, Frederick 318,900 2,895.61 

Wiggin, Richard & Agnes 442,200 4,015.18 

Wilbor, Anne E. 839,100 7,619.03 

Wiley, David & Mary 403,300 3,661.96 

Wilfert, Fred & Eleanor 239,300 2,172.84 

Willemin, Julian & Jane 229,200 2,081.14 

Williams, Edwin & Ruth 310,400 2,818.43 

Williams, John & Anne 283,600 2,575.09 



197 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1987 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Williams, Pamela M. 
Williams, William & Gertrude 
Willmann, Werner & Margaret 
Wilson, Donald & Cheryl 
Wilson, Robert A. 
Winchell, Enid M. 
Winchell, G./Keevil, C. 
Winchell, Gordon D. 
Winchell, Guilbert & Amy 
Winchell, Richard & Martha 
Winship, Lee & Joyce 
Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth 
Witherby, Marianne J. 
Wofford, John & Joan 
Wolf, Robert & Bryce 
Wolff, James & Carol 
Woll, Edward & Barbara 
Wong, Judith/Myers, Larry 
Woo, Robert & Lillian 
Woo, Way Dong & Emily 
Wood, George & Nancy 
Wood, Hilve V. 
Wood, Ronald & Wendy 
Wood, Virginia S. 
Woodington, W Gordon & Mary 
Woodworth, Coline/McKenna, J 
Woznac, Richard W. 
Wright, Malor & Ruth Vaughn 
Wu, Pei-Rin & Susan 
Wyatt, Peter & Janice 
Wyman, Michael & Kathleen 

Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Yamron, Joseph & Joan 
Yates, Nancy C. 
Yates, Richard & Daniel 
Yates, William & M Paige 
Yi, Cheng-Ying & Jen Hua 
Yore, George & Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold & Ann 
Young, Anne 
Young, G Stewart 
Young, Lee & Jane 
Young, Robin & Laurie 

Zee, Molly B. 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. 
Zock., Robt. /Bennett, P. 
Zuelke, Laurence & Nancy 



341,200 


i 3,098.10 


287,600 


2,611.41 


470,600 


4,273.05 


365,000 


3,314.20 


188,500 


1,711.58 


509,500 


4,626.26 


298,200 


2,707.66 


133,900 


1,215.81 


390,100 


3,542.11 


376,100 


3,414.99 


353,000 


3,205.24 


642,400 


5,832.99 


247,900 


2,250.93 


352,800 


3,203.42 


248,600 


2,257.29 


388,700 


3,529.40 


265,300 


2,408.92 


225,500 


2,047.54 


323,000 


2,932.84 


371,300 


3,371.40 


285,900 


2,595.97 


280,400 


2,546.03 


308,700 


2,803.00 


140,900 


1,279.37 


306,700 


2,784.84 


199,300 


1,809.64 


269,900 


2,450.69 


312,700 


2,839.32 


344,600 


3,128.97 


297,200 


2,698.58 


310,100 


2,815.71 


22,700 


206.12 


581,200 


5,277.29 


211,700 


1,922.24 


237,800 


2,159.22 


173,300 


1,573.56 


260,600 


2,366.25 


155,500 


1,411.94 


191,100 


1,735.19 


571,100 


5,185.59 


352,200 


3,197.98 


396,500 


3,600.22 


241,000 


2,188.28 


506,700 


4,600.83 


4,000 


36.32 


400,800 


3,639.26 


267,600 


2,429.81 



198 



^ -^^gr 



■3% 



»»•« 



S?- •» 




' y£ '" 




REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1988 - 1989 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joanne M. Fraser 
Hamilton R. James 

Lucian L. Leape 

L. Bruce Long, Jr. 

Michael L. Tennican 

Agnes Connors Wiggin 

Harriet B. Todd, Chairman 



COVER: Photo by Ann Ringwood, 
Beacon Communications 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

1988 - 1989 

CONTENTS 

I. Introduction 
II. Revenue Estimates 
III. Operating Budgets 

A. Distribution of Proposed Expenses 

B. Highlights of Major Budget Categories 

1. Town Operations 

a. Salaries 

b. Expenses 

2. Education 



a. Elementary Schools 

b. L. S. Regional High School 

c. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 



3. Debt 

4. Pensions & Insurance 
IV. Special Warrant Articles 

V. Taxation 
VI. Proposition 2 1/2 Budget 
VII. Conclusion 
Exhibits 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1988 - 1989 

I . INTRODUCTION 

The Finance Committee Is recommending an operating budget for Fiscal 
Year 1989 of $9, 669,000, an increase of $1,359,000 over the current 
year. In order to fund the recommended budget and warrant articles an 
override of Proposition 2 1/2 of $432,000 is necessary. The total 
increase in the tax levy with the override is $1,389,000 or 23%. The 
requested override is more than three times as large as last year's. 
Since the tax levy is going up about 15% before the override is added, 
mostly to pay the debt service on bonded expenses voted at previous Town 
Meetings, the Finance Committee has carefully scrutinized proposed 
expenditures to be sure that they are no higher than is fiscally prudent, 
and still provide the level of service we feel Townspeople want. 

A more detailed explanation of the revenue projections and the 
spending increases which necessitate the $432,000 override, as well as a 
description of what would happen if the override failed to pass, appears 
in subsequent sections of this report. Briefly, the $1,199,000 increase 
in projected revenue is largely taken up by a $762,000 net increase in 
debt service and an $85,000 increase in pension and insurance costs. A 
growing elementary school population, salary increases to fairly 
compensate our town employees, and unavoidable increases to maintain town 
services at the current level, far exceed the remaining $352,000 of 
additional revenue. 

The override is voted as a ballot question at the Town Election 
following Town Meeting on Monday, March 28. On the ballot will also be a 
question on excluding the debt service on the bonding for the permanent 
transfer station. A yes vote on both these questions is necessary to 
fund the budget and warrant articles which the Finance Committee will 
support at Town Meeting. 



II. REVENUE ESTIMATES 

Within the limits of Proposition 2 1/2, the projected net available 
revenues for FY89 to cover the operating budget, water department and 
warrant articles are $10,116,000, up $1,199,000 over FY88. A detailed 
breakdown of revenue and assessments for the two years is shown in Table 



TABLE 1 
Estimated Revenue for FY89 vs. FY88 Actual (000' s) 



Revenues 


Actual FY88 


Est. FY89 


Change 


Tax Levy 


$6,033 


$6,990 


$957 


Local Receipts 


1,411 


1,483 


72 


State Receipts 


1,214 


1,214 





Free Cash 


156 


436 


280 


Revenue Sharing 


51 





(51) 


Other 


446 


362 


(84) 


Total Receipts 


$9,311 


$10,485 


$1,174 


Less Assessments 


$ 394 


$ 369 


$ (25) 



Net Available Revenue $8,917 $10,116 $1,199 



Proposition 2 1/2 limits the increase in the tax levy to 2 1/2% from 
year to year. This amounts to about $140,000 for Lincoln. The tax levy 
is going up 15% even without an override because next year's budget 
contains $994,000 in new debt service which has been exempted from the 
limits of Proposition 2 1/2 by votes of the Town. State aid is estimated 
as being level funded as of the writing of this report. Significantly 
more free cash is being used next year than in FY88 in order to keep the 
override from being even higher. Using $436,000 in free cash brings the 
balance after Town Meeting to $100,000, down from $250,000 following the 
1987 Annual Meeting. This reduces the Town's reserves available in 
emergency, or to be used for the FY90 budget. An override of $432,000, 
which the Finance Committee is recommending, would bring net available 
revenues to $10,548,000. 

III. OPERATING BUDGETS 

The total operating budget which the Finance Committee supports is 
$9,669,000. We feel that this is a prudent compromise between the 
$9,761,000 budget originally submitted by the various Town and School 
boards, and the $9,381,000 which would be necessary if the override does 
not pass. Exhibit 1 shows the submitted, recommended and 2 1/2 budgets 
for FY89 compared to FY88. The reasons for the major increases in the 
recommended budget are discussed below. The effects of the cuts to reach 
a 2 1/2 budget are discussed in section VI of this report. The line 
items for the recommended budget are shown in Exhibit 4. 

A. Distribution of Proposed Expenditures 

Table 2 shows the distribution of planned expenditures for FY88 and 
FY89 to highlight changes in where the Town's money is spent. 







TABLE 2 








Distribution 


of Budget 


Appropriations 


Percent o 






Amounts 


i (000s) 


Percent 


f Budget 




FY88 


FY89 


Increase 


FY88 


FY89 


General Government 


$ 557 


$ 653 


13.2% 


6.9% 


6.8% 


Conservation Commission 


132 


148 


12.1 


1.6 


1.5 


Public Safety 


953 


1,007 


5.6 


11.5 


10.4 


Public Works 


867 


881 


1.6 


10.4 


9.1 


Library 


308 


327 


6.2 


3.7 


3.4 


Other 


411 


438 


6.6 


5.0 


4.5 


Total Town Operations 


3,248 


3,454 


6.3 


39.1 


35.7 


Education 


3,523 


3,829 


8.7 


42.4 


39.6 


Debt Service 


650 


1,412 


117.2 


7.8 


14.6 


Pensions/Insurance 


889 


974 


9.6 


10.7 


10.1 



Grand Total 



$ 8,310 $ 9,669 



16.4% 



100.0% 



100.0% 



The doubling of the debt service amount overshadows all other 
relative changes in the budget distribution, causing every other area to 
decline as a percent of the total budget. 



B. Highlights of Major Budget Categories 

1. Town Operations 

a. Salaries 

The biggest item of increase in the Town Budget is salaries. Salaries 
are up $153,000 in the various line items of the budget, to which will be 
added $65,000 in the salary warrant article. (The salary warrant article 
is a pool for general increases for non-union employees.) $27,000 of the 
salary increase is for additional hours, and $20,000 is for increases for 
the pool and summer day camp staffs. (The Recreation Committee is 
raising its fees to cover the increases, so that the total net cost to 
the Town of recreation is $41,000, slightly less than this year.) The 
rest of the salary increase amount is for raises negotiated by the DPW, 
police and fire unions, and those resulting from a new salary schedule 
for non-union employees implemented in the current year. It should be 
noted that the increase in town salaries alone more than uses up the 
$140,000 allowable increase under Proposition 2 1/2. 

The results of surveys done of surrounding towns show that Lincoln's 
employees generally fall in the middle of the ranges of salaries paid 
elsewhere for similar jobs. The Finance Committee believes that it is 
important that Town employees be paid fairly in order to hire and retain 
the people necessary to do the quality of work that citizens expect. 

b. Expenses 

Town expenses are up $82,000 (6.7%). This is a result of a variety 
of small increases in various line items such as bank charges, data 
processing expense, legal fees, planning money for a possible 
conservation land purchase, etc. One small bit of good news, the NESWC 
tipping fee which has increased astronomically for the last two years is 
actually projected to be $16,000 (10%) less for FY89. The police and 
fire departments and the DPW are to be commended for coming in with level 
budgets on expenses. 

2. Education 

The proposed FY89 budget for education is $3,829,000, up $306,000 
(8.7%). Tables 3 shows the breakdown of money between the three schools. 



TABLE 3 

Education Budgets FY88 vs FY89 (000s) 

Change 
FY88 FY89 Amount 

Elementary 

L. S. Regional 

Vo-Tech 

Total 3,523 3,829 306 8.7% 



2,544 


2,861 


317 


12.5% 


923 


924 


1 


0.1% 


56 


44 


-12 


-21.4% 



a. Elementary Schools 

About $120,000 of the increase in the elementary school budget is due 
to special education costs. Several new special ed students entered the 
system this year after the budget was voted in March, 1987. The costs 
for FY88 are being funded by a combination of an unanticipated METCO 
reimbursement, a reserve fund transfer and a warrant article at the March 
'88 Town Meeting to add the necessary balance to this year's budget. The 
whole amount must be included in the FY89 budget as the expense is 
expected to be ongoing. In addition, the growing school population 
requires the addition of one section at the cost of $40,000 for the 
classroom teacher and associated specialist time (art, music, computer 
and gym). The other large area of increase is $124,000 in salary 
increases for the teaching and non-union staff. Approximately $25,000 
will be used to fund budgeted increases for instructional support and 
supplies. 

b. L. S. Regional High School 

The high school's total budget is $8,580,000, up 6.5%. The largest 
fraction of this increase, $222,000, is to bring clerical and 
administrative support staff salaries up to community levels. Salary 
increases for teachers total $204,000. Although enrollment is declining, 
the teaching staff is being maintained at the 1936/87 level in order to 
reduce class size and total number of students per teacher. Lincoln's 
assessment is virtually level because the enrollment of Lincoln students 
has dropped in relation to Sudbury. 

There will be a warrant article at Town Meeting to amend the regional 
agreement to help smooth out the swings in assessment percentage, and to 
create an Excess and Deficiency Fund. The Finance Committee favors this 
proposal, and will comment on it in its handout at Town Meeting. 

c. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

The total school budget is $9,327,000, up 2.8%. Lincoln's assssment 
is down by $11,000 because of the attendance of three fewer students. 

3. Debt 

At $1,412,000 debt service has become the second largest Item in the 
budget, exceeded only by the elementary school. The increase of $762,000 
from FY88 to FY89 is accounted for by the first payments of principal on 
the five capital projects voted in the last two years, (McHugh land 
purchase, library construction, bathhouse, school roof and landfill 
closure), and new debt for the construction of the transfer station. 
Exhibit 2 shows the payments 1987 through 1994 for each bonded project. 
All new debt service has a direct effect on the tax levy, since once the 
Town votes to exempt it from the limits of Proposition 2 1/2, it is 
automatically added to the tax levy over and above the increase allowed 
by Proposition 2 1/2. Another such increase is not anticipated in FY90 
at this point. However, if a major land purchase is made, another jump 
will occur. 



4. Pensions and Insurance 

After several years of rapid rise, the rate of increase for these 
line items has slowed, with property and Indemnity insurance actually 
showing a $10,000 decrease. The retirement fund and the employee health 
insurance, however, are up a total of $96,000 (15.3%). 

IV. SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES 

Warrant articles for FY89 total $759,000, of which $410,000 would be 
raised by borrowing. This compares with $1,650,000 in warrants for FY83, 
of which $1,420,000 was raised by borrowing. 

As of this writing the individual items are: 

1. Pay raises $ 65,000 

2. Police cruisers (2) 27,000 

3. Vehicle lease/purchase 

(Bucket truck, ambulance, sweeper) 43,000 

4. Building maintenance 28,000 

5. Legal costs 

(Waltham development, landfill) 50,000 

6. Study fire/police building 15,000 

7. DPW vehicles 37,000 

8. DPW fire alarm 7,000 

9. Emergency preempt 7,000 

10. Hazardous waste pickup 10,000 

11. FY88 school budget increase 50,000 

12. School handicapped access 10,000 

Sub Total (current funds) 349,000 

13. Transfer station 410,000 

Total $759,000 

The funds for the permanent transfer station construction would be 
raised by bonding. There will be a ballot question at the town election 
to exempt the debt service from the limits of Proposition 2 1/2. 

The Finance Committee's recommendations on the warrant articles 
will be presented at Town Meeting. 



V. TAXATION 

If the override is passed the total amount to be raised by taxation 
will be $7,422,000, an increase of 23%. The increase to individual taxes 
will vary depending on relative changes in valuation, but Townspeople 
should expect about a 20% increase in their tax bills next fall. 



VI. PROPOSITION 2 1/2 BUDGET 

The budget the Finance Committee is recommending plus an amount 
sufficient to cover the water department expenses and the proposed 
warrant articles requires an override of $432,000. Table 4 recaps this 
calculation. 



TABLE 4 
FY89 Revenue & Expense Projections (000s) 



Budget 9,669 

Water Department 530 
Warrants 349 



Total Expenses 10,548 

2 1/2 Tax Levy 6,990 
Other Revenue 3,495 
Less Assessments 369 

Total Revenue 10 , 116 

Override Needed 432 

* Not including bonding for transfer station. 



The budget and warrant articles are voted at Town Meeting on 
Saturday, March 26. The override is voted as a ballot question at the 
Town Election the following Monday, March 28. In order to have an idea 
of the impact on services should the override not pass, the Finance 
Committee asked the major boards to list prioritized cuts up to 10% of 
their total budget and warrant articles as originally submitted. Exhibit 
1 shows the dollar effects of a failed override on the major spending 
centers. 

The reductions described here are not necessarily exactly the ones 
which would be taken should the override fail, but they represent the 
best effort by the various boards to prioritize reductions in their areas 
of jurisdiction. 

The Selectmen chose not to lay off any permanent employees, but 
rather to eliminate large sections of the DPW budget which covers work 
done by outside contractors. This would totally eliminate road repaving, 
and greatly reduce street lining, mowing, drainage work, and other small 
miscellaneous projects. In addition, the Selectmen would postpone the 
purchase of one DPW truck and both police cruisers. The hazardous waste 
pickup and the study of the fire and police building would also be put 
off to another year. 

The Conservation Commission would eliminate the summer ranger program 
and be forced to reduce their supplies and equipment budget to a level 
where it would be difficult to carry out their land management program. 

The Library Trustees would close the library one day per week, and 
reduce their professional staff, which would adversely effect their 
programs and level of service. They would also reduce the purchase of 
new books and materials. 

The only item which the Recreation Committee felt it could eliminate 
which would not effect their revenues was the repair of the baby pool. 
If necessary they would rather raise fees than reduce programs since 
nearly 70% of their budget is covered by revenues. 



Since 75% of the elementary school budget is salaries, and a large 
portion of the rest are irreducible costs such as special education and 
transportation, there is very little which can be cut without directly 
affecting the educational program. At this point the School Committee 
priorities would mean totally eliminating the Brooks elective program, 
computer specialists' assistants and summer curriculum development work, 
plus reducing teacher aides and closing the library two days a week. 

A $46,000 reduction in Lincoln's assessment for Lincoln Sudbury High 
School means a $320,000 reduction in their total budget. This would be 
accomplished by a substantial reduction in the athletic program, and the 
elimination of six or seven teachers. The cut in teachers would mean an 
increase in class size in the major departments and probably the 
elimination of one or more of the smaller departments. 

The remaining smaller boards might have to take cuts in place of some 
of those outlined above. The exact scenario if the override does not 
pass has not been determined as of this writing. 

Clearly, failure to pass the override would have severe repercussions 
in many areas, and make it difficult for town employees to carry out 
their jobs. Therefore the Finance Committee supports the passage of the 
ballot question for a $432,000 override. 

VII. CONCLUSION 

FY89 is an unusually tough budget year because of the large increase 
in debt service combined with some necessary increases in the operating 
budget. Projections for FY90 suggest there will still be a need for an 
override next year, but the debt service will level off, resulting in a 
smaller increase in the tax levy than will occur in FY89. By FY90 the 
tax levy will benefit from the construction in North Lincoln and possibly 
some other new development as well. On the other hand, if the Town makes 
a major land purchase the debt service will go up once again. 

In conclusion, we wish to thank all Town boards, departments, 
committees and the three school committees whose budgets we reviewed for 
their cooperation and understanding. Not only did they on the whole 
start with tight realistic budgets, they also were helpful in supplying 
the information necessary to arrive at an estimate of a 2 1/2 budget. In 
addition, we would like to extend our appreciation to the Town Offices 
staff for their assistance. 



Joanne M. Fraser 
Hamilton R. James 
Lucian L. Leape 
L. Bruce Long, Jr. 
Michael L. Tennican 
Agnes Connors Wiggin 
Harriet B. Todd, Chairman 



EXHIBIT 1 



FY89 Budgets Originally Submitted, Recommended and 2 1/2 vs FY88 (000s) 





FY88 






FY89 








Original 


Recommended 


2 1/2 


2 1/2 Cuts 


General Gov 


709 


790 


801 




778 


23 


Public Safety 


953 


1,009 


1,007 




1,007 




Health & San 


106 


135 


120 




120 




DPW 


867 


881 


881 




808 


73 


Elem School 2 


,544 


2,886 


2,861 




2,746 


115 


Regional 


923 


990 


924 




878 


46 


Vo Tech 


56 


59 


44 




44 




Library 


308 


332 


327 




299 


28 


Recreation 


104 


134 


134 




131 


3 


Cemetery 


14 


14 


14 




14 




Debt Service 


650 


1,359 


1,412 




1,412 




Housing 


25 


35 


31 




31 




Reserve Fund 


150 


150 


125 




125 




Other Unclassified 


901 
,310 


988 
9,761 


988 
9,669 




988 
9,381 




Total Budget 8 


288 


Water Department 


411 


458 


530 




530 




Warrant Articles* 


230 


414 


349 




204 


145 



Total 8,951 10,633 10,548 

* Not including articles paid for by bonding. 



10,115 



433 



EXHIBIT 2 
Debt Service From FY87 Projected Through FY94 (000s) 
Item FY8 7 FY88 FY89 FY90 FY91 FY92 FY93 FY94 

McHugh Conservation 
McHugh Serial Loan* 
Library Addition 
Bathhouse Const. 
School Roof 
Landfill Closure 



126 


104 


99 
126 


95 
72 


90 
38 


86 


82 


100 


441 


422 


404 


385 


366 


347 


7 


32 


30 


29 


27 


26 


24 




101 


96 


92 


88 


83 


79 




121 


116 


111 


106 


100 


95 



Permanent 
Transfer Station 






71 


67 


64 


61 


58 


55 


Umbrella Land 


12 


11 














Land Purchase 


27 


26 


25 


24 


23 


22 


21 




Sandy Pond Land 


237 


226 


215 


204 


194 


183 


172 


161 


Ricci Land 


130 


124 


118 


112 


101 


95 


89 


84 


Codman Farmhouse 


16 


15 


14 


14 


13 


12 


11 


11 


Codman Barn Repair 


6 


5 


5 












Energy 
Conservation Loan 


36 


33 


31 


24 


22 


21 







TOTAL 464 673 1,404 1,280 1,186 1,090 1,012 938 



* Will be repaid by the developer 



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H 



WARRANT 
1988 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting 
for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School 
Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-sixth day of March 
next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following articles, 
except Article 1, and also to meet at the Brooks School Auditorium on 
Monday, the twenty-eighth day of March next, at 7:30 a.m., then and there 
to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this Warrant, by 
you attested, in said Town, seven days at least before the twenty-sixth 
day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March 
twenty-eighth, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each of 
the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

School Committee for three years 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for one year 

Planning Board member for five years 

Planning Board member for four years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

Director DeCordova & Dana Museum and Park for four years 

Housing Commission member for three years 

Recreation Committee member for three years 

Regional School Committee member (2) for three years 

and also the following questions: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an 
additional $ 431,986.00 in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the purposes of funding the Town's operating 
expenses for the fiscal year beginning July first, nineteen 
hundred and eighty-eight. 

(2) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of proposition two and one-half, so called, the 
amount required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
design and construct a permanent transfer station at the 
landfill site? 



22 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 

several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ 
for additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under Article 
5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for non-union 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 7. To see ^if the Town will vote to authorize the 

Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1988, in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44 Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Secion 17, as amended. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selctmen and the School Committee to continue the Town's 
annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary 
school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee and Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the 

School Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes of 
education, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will approve either or both of 

the following two Amendments to the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School District Agreement, dated March, 1954 and as heretofore 
amended (the "Agreement"), as proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional District School Committee: 

Amendment A 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended to read in its 
entirety as follows: 

"5. Apportionment of Expenses and Other Items 

(a) Apportionment of Costs 

The several costs of construction and operation of the 
District and payments of principal of and interest on 
its bonds, notes and other obligations shall be 
apportioned to the member towns as follows: each 
member town's share for each fiscal period shall be 
determined by computing the ratio which the sum of its 
pupil enrollments in the regional school district on 
October 1 of the three years next preceding the start 
of such fiscal period bears to the sura of the pupil 
enrollments in the regional school district of all the 
member towns on October 1 of the same three years. The 
Treasurer of each member town shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the District the amount of such town's 
share of each installment of principal of and interest 
on bonds, notes and other obligations of the District 
at least thirty days before the due date thereof. The 
Treasurer of each member town shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the District the amount of such town's 
apportioned and certified share of all other expenses 
in twelve equal installments on the tenth day of each 
month. 

(b) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid 

Any Federal, State or other aid or grants received by 
the District shall be credited by the District to its 
budgeted expenses, and the apportionment to the member 
towns under subpart (a) above shall be the net costs 
after the application of said aid or grants. 

(c) Miscellaneous Income Defined 

Miscellaneous Income shall include all income of the 
District other than the assessments paid by the member 
towns pursuant to subpart (a) above any any Federal, 
State or other aid or grants." 

2. Section 7 of the Agreement is amended by substituting 
for the last sentence of the first paragraph the following: 

"The withdrawing Town's share of future maturing 
principal and interest shall be computed in accordance 
with Section 5(a), with credit for State aid as 
provided in Section 5 (b), at the time of giving of 
such notice." 

3. Section 9 of the Agreement is amended as follows: 



24 



(A) By amending the last sentence of the third-to-last 
paragraph to read as follows: 

"Not later than forty-five days prior to the earliest 
date on which the business session of the annual town 
meeting of any member town is to be held, but in no 
event later than March 31 of such period (provided that 
said budget need not be adopted earlier than February 
1), the Committee shall adopt a budget for the ensuing 
fiscal period and apportion the amount thereof between 
the member towns according to their respective 
apportionment ratios as set forth in Section 5(a)." 

(B) By striking out the next-to-last paragraph in its 
entirety. 

4. This Amendment A shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment A by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 

AMENDMENT B 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended by adding at the 
end the following subsection: 

" Excess and Deficiency Fund 

All unexpended funds, or any portion therof, may in the 
discretion of the Regional District School Committee 
and with the written approval of the Finance Committees 
of each of the member towns, be paid into the Excess 
and Deficiency Fund provided, however, that at no time 
shall the total of the sums in the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund exceed five percent (5%) of the total 
District budget for the succeeding fiscal period. 
Monies in the Excess and Deficiency Fund may be 
expended, in the discretion of the Regional District 
School Committee for any of the following purposes: 
(i) to meet extraordinary and non-recurring costs 
attributable to the operation and maintenance of the 
Regional District School; (ii) to pay any other 
extraordinary costs when amounts from the sources 
described in subparts (a), (b), and (c) above are 
insufficient to pay such costs; or (iii) to reduce the 
assessment to the member towns in any fiscal period. 
Any such reduction of the assessment shall be in 
accordance with apportionment ratios set forth in 
subpart (a) above for the fiscal period in which such 
reduction occurs. Monies paid into the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund shall be deemed received and reserved 
for special purposes within the meaning of Section 9." 

2. This Amendment B shall take effect witli respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment B by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 



or act on anything relative thereto. 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Tovm will approve the following 

Amendment to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District 
Agreement, dated March, 1954 and as heretofore amended (the 
"Agreement"), as proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
District School Committee: 

AMENDMENT 

1. Section 8 of the Agreement is amended by deleting the 
sentence "Any vote to adopt or reject the proposal shall be 
by written ballot." 

2. This Amendment shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning after the 
approval of this Amendment by each of the member towns, and 
each fiscal period thereafter. 



or act on anything relative thereto. 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the design 
and construction of a permanent transfer station at the landfill site, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to be used by 
various departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and 
to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of 
excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to lease, 
purchase or lease with an option to purchase equipment and vehicles for 
various Town departments, and to see if the Town will authorize the 
disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination there of for the repair 
and maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



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ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to (i) raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for renovations 
to the Codman Barns, said monies to be added to funds previously 
appropriated for such renovations under Article 31 of the Warrant for 
the 1986 Annual Town Meeting (the "1986 Appropriation"), or (ii) take 
alternative action to direct the 1986 Appropriation towards specific 
renovations of the Barns, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for 
professional services and other expenses (i) with respect to 
traffic-related issues including but not limited to the widening of 
Winter Street and Old County Road, and (ii) in pursuit of any petition 
or claim on behalf of the Town for State payment or reimbursement of 
certain costs associated with the landfill closure, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
purchase and installation of a fire alarm system at the Department of 
Public Works, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to conduct a 
study of the structural integrity, heating and electrical systems, space 
utilization and similar aspects of the Town's Public Safety Building, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
purchase of emergency pre-emption devices to allow Lincoln's emergency 
vehicles to control the intersection at Route 2 and Bedford Road, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 

of money from Free Cash to be added to monies previously 
appropriated for Elementary School Education under Article 5 of the 
Warrant for the 1987 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

School Committee 



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ARTICLE 22. To see if the Tov/n will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
purposes of undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the 
Town's school buildings in order to improve access to handicapped 
persons, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to provide a 
one-day, Townwide hazardous waste collection, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Board of Health 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court to 
enact legislation that would authorize the collection by the Town of 
fees or charges on the transfer of real property, said monies to be used 
to acquire, maintain and preserve land for conservation and open space 
purposes and to acquire real property and implement programs for 
affordable housing, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General 

Bylaws by adding a new Article entitled Ceneral Wetlands 
Protection Bylaw , to provide additional protection to Lincoln wetlands, 
a copy of the text of which proposed Article is on file with the Town 
Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to obtain 
engineering or other consultant services for a planning study of the 
Town's Water Distribution System and the administration of its Water 
Department, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will appropriate all of the 

unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan of J>700, 000 
(approximately $2,225.00), which was originally borrowed, pursuant to a 
vote under Article 10 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting held 
on June 16, 1981, to construct a concrete reservoir at the location of 
the existing open water distribution reservoir off Bedford Road together 
with associated pipes, fixtures and other equipment, for the laying and 
re-laying of certain water mains, money for which may be borrowed under 
the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Water Commissioners 



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ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof for the laying and /or re-laying of certain water mains 
along Route 2 in the areas of the intersections of Lexington 
Road, Page Road and Mill Street, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 

40, Section 8 G of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, which will allow the Town to enter into agreements with 
other cities and towns to provide mutual aid programs for 
police departments, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings, thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for 
the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands this 
twenty-ninth day of February in the year of our Lord 
one-thousand nine-hundred eighty-eight. 



John R. Caswell 

Susan C. Fargo 

John C. Goodrich, Chairman 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



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